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All About Guns Well I thought it was funny!

One of my more Favorite Commercials


Sorry about the poor Visuals but I still like it! As it reminds me of what the Boss would do if I wasn’t home. Grumpy

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SMITH & WESSON INC MOD.1903 HAND EJECTOR 3.25 INCH BARREL .32 S&W Long

SMITH & WESSON INC - MOD.1903 HAND EJECTOR 3.25 INCH BARREL
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SMITH & WESSON INC - MOD.1903 HAND EJECTOR 3.25 INCH BARREL - Picture 7
SMITH & WESSON INC - MOD.1903 HAND EJECTOR 3.25 INCH BARREL - Picture 8

Smith & Wesson Model 30

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Smith & Wesson Model 30
Type Revolver
Place of origin United States
Production history
Manufacturer Smith & Wesson
Produced 1903-1976
Specifications
Length
  • 8 inches (200 mm) with 4 in (100 mm) barrel
Barrel length
  • 2 inches (51 mm)
  • 3 inches (76 mm)
  • 4 inches (100 mm)
  • 6 inches (150 mm)

Cartridge
Action Double-action
Feed system Six round cylinder
Sights fixed

The Smith & Wesson Model 30 is a small-frame, six-shot, double-action revolver chambered for the .32 Long cartridge. It was based on the Smith & Wesson Hand Ejector Model of 1903, and could be had with either a blued or nickel finish. It was a “round butt” I-frame and was produced from 1948 to 1976.[1]

History

From 1948 to 1957, this model was known as the “Model .32 Hand Ejector” and was built on the 5-screw I-Frame.
In 1958 the frame was redesigned to use four screws and a coiled mainspring as opposed to a flat or leaf spring and called the “Improved I-Frame”.
Three years later in 1961, the “I-Frame” was discontinued and the slightly longer 3-screw “J-Frame” replaced it.[1]

Variants

A square butt version first known as the “Model .32 Regulation Police” was made during the same time period as the “Model .32 Hand Ejector” and was eventually replaced by the Model 31 in 1958.
The Model 31 followed the same path as the Model 30 with regard to production dates.[1]
————————————–

.32 S&W Long

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
.32 S&W Long
76238comparison.jpg

.32 S&W Long (left) in comparison with .32 H&R Magnum and 7.62×38mmR Nagant
Type Revolver
Place of origin United States
Production history
Designer Smith & Wesson
Designed 1896
Produced 1896–Present
Specifications
Parent case .32 S&W
Base diameter .337 in (8.6 mm)
Rim diameter .375 in (9.5 mm)
Rim thickness .055 in (1.4 mm)
Case length .920 in (23.4 mm)
Overall length 1.280 in (32.5 mm)
Ballistic performance
Bullet mass/type Velocity Energy
98 gr (6 g) LHBWC 718 ft/s (219 m/s) 112 ft·lbf (152 J)
90 gr (6 g) LSWC 765 ft/s (233 m/s) 117 ft·lbf (159 J)
85 gr (6 g) JHP 723 ft/s (220 m/s) 99 ft·lbf (134 J)
Source(s): Hodgdon [1]

The .32 S&W Long is a straight-walled, centerfirerimmed handguncartridge, based on the earlier .32 S&W cartridge. It was introduced in 1896 for Smith & Wesson‘s first-model Hand Ejector revolver. Coltcalled it the .32 Colt New Police in revolvers it made chambered for the cartridge.[2]

History[edit]

The .32 S&W Long was introduced in 1896 with the company’s first hand ejector revolver. The .32 Long is simply a lengthened version of the earlier .32 S&W. The hand ejector design has evolved some, but with its swing out cylinder on a crane, has been the basis for every S&W revolver designed since. In 1896, the cartridge was loaded with black powder. In 1903 the small hand ejector was updated with a new design. The cartridge stayed the same, but was now loaded with smokeless powder to roughly the same chamber pressure.[2]
When he was the New York City Police CommissionerTheodore Roosevelt standardized the department’s use of the Colt New Policerevolver. The cartridge was then adopted by several other northeastern U.S. police departments.[3] The .32 Long is well known as an unusually accurate cartridge. This reputation led Police Commissioner Roosevelt to select it as an expedient way to increase officers’ accuracy with their revolvers in New York City. The Colt company referred to the .32 S&W Long cartridge as the .32 “Colt’s New Police” cartridge, concurrent with the conversion of the Colt New Police revolver from .32 Long Colt. The cartridges are functionally identical with the exception that the .32 NP cartridge has been historically loaded with a flat nosed bullet as opposed to the round nose of the .32 S&W Long.[2]

Above:Iver Johnson Safety Automatic* Below: Colt Police Positive -both chambered for .32 Smith and Wesson Long/ Colt New Police* Automatic refers to automatic, simultaneous ejection of cartridges and/or cases.

Current use[edit]

In the United States, it is usually older revolvers which are chambered in this caliber. The cartridge has mostly fallen out of use due to smaller revolvers chambered in .38 S&W Special being more effective for self-defense.[2]
The .32 S&W Long is popular among international competitors in ISSF 25m centerfire pistol, using high-end target pistols from makers such as Pardini,[4]Morini,[5] Hämmerli,[6] Benelli,[7] and Walther,[8] among others, but chambered for wadcutter bullet type.[9] The sporting variant of the Manurhin MR 73, also known as MR 32, is also chambered in .32 S&W Long.[10]
The IOF .32 Revolver manufactured by the Ordnance Factories Organization in India for civilian licence holders is chambered for this cartridge.[11]

Modern High velocity loadings of the .32 S&W Long/Colt New Police.

Interchangeability[edit]

The .32 S&W Long headspaces on the rim and shares the rim dimensions and case and bullet diameters of the shorter .32 S&W cartridge and the longer .32 H&R Magnum and .327 Federal Magnum cartridges. The shorter .32 S&W may be fired in handguns chambered for the .32 S&W Long; and the .32 S&W Long may be fired in arms chambered for the longer H&R and Federal magnums; although the longer cartridges should not fit and must not be fired in arms designed for the shorter and less powerful cartridges.[12]
The .32 S&W Long and .32 Long Colt are not interchangeable.[2] At one time it was widely publicized that these rounds would interchange, but in truth it has never been deemed safe to do so.[2]

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What’s So Special About the 3-Screw Ruger Blackhawk?

 
Image result for 3-Screw Ruger Blackhawk
If you happen to stumble onto an online forum for Ruger firearms or single action revolvers you may find that the term “3-screw Blackhawk” appears quite frequently.  You may also notice that some people have a certain esteem for the 3-screw Ruger Blackhawk over other Blackhawks and will go to great lengths to acquire one.
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Many people new to revolvers probably have no idea what a 3-screw Ruger Blackhawk is, and even those who know what a 3-screw Blackhawk is probably don’t understand why revolver cranks covet these relics over all others.  This post will explore a little of the Ruger Blackhawk history and tease out why the 3-screw Blackhawk is such a desirable gun and why collectors and non-collectors alike should seek one out for themselves.
Image result for 3-Screw Ruger Blackhawk

A History of the Ruger Blackhawk

The history of the Ruger Blackhawk begins with the Ruger Single Six, a single action revolver based on the Colt Single Action Army Revolver of 1873 and chambered for the .22 Long Rifle cartridge.  The Single Six was a popular seller for Ruger and indicated that there was a demand for single action revolvers in post WWII America.
Image result for 3-Screw Ruger Blackhawk
In 1955 Ruger introduced the Blackhawk chambered for the .357 Magnum cartridge.  The Blackhawk replicated the size of the old Colt Single Action in both frame size and grip size.  The Blackhawk also had adjustable sights mounted on a flattop frame like many of the custom Colts and Colt Single Action target models.
Besides replacing the Colt flat springs with coil springs for better durability and using a frame mounted firing pin, the lock work of the Ruger Blackhawk was very similar to that of the Colt.  The Blackhawk hammer had four distinct clicks that could be heard while it was brought back to full cock—which was characteristic of the Colts—and to freely spin the cylinder for loading the hammer had to be placed at half-cock, another characteristic of Colts and older single action revolvers.  Because the lock work was so similar to that of the Colt, the Ruger Blackhawk had three screws on the side of the frame just as the Colts did.  This model 3-screw Blackhawk is commonly referred to as the “flattop” due to its flat top strap.

Ruger Blackhawk Flattop Model

The original .357 Magnum Ruger Blackhawk—The Flattop. Notice the flat top strap, adjustable sights, and the 3 screws in the side of the frame.

Around 1956 Ruger introduced a .44 Magnum version of the Blackhawk built on a larger frame to handle the increased pressures of the new cartridge.  The .357 Magnum Blackhawk continued to be manufactured on the smaller Colt-sized frame, so Ruger was now producing Blackhawks in two frame sizes.
Starting in 1962 Ruger added “ears” to the top strap of the revolver around the rear sight.  In SixgunsElmer Keith had recommended that Ruger add some protective “ears” to the rear sight to protect it from being knocked out of alignment when the rear sight was raised for long distance shooting.  I am not sure whether Keith actually influenced the decision by Ruger to add the “ears”, but Sixguns was released in 1955 and a revised edition was released in 1961—both predating the “ears” on the Blackhawk—so the ears may be his handiwork.
In 1973 wholesale changes were made to the Ruger Blackhawk.  The lock work was changed from that of a Colt to something completely new.  Instead of setting the hammer to half-cock for loading, the loading gate now regulated the cylinder for loading and the hammer no longer had the four clicks found on previous Blackhawks and Colts.  A transfer bar safety was also added which made the gun safe to carry with six rounds in the cylinder.  As a result of the changes to the inner workings of the Blackhawk, there were now only two screws on the side of the frame.
In addition to the inner changes to Blackhawk, there was one notable outward change.  Probably to simplify manufacturing, all Ruger Blackhawks from 1973 onward, regardless of caliber, would be built on the larger .44 Magnum sized frame.  This revised revolver was renamed and released as the New Model Blackhawk, thus ending the life of the 3-screw Blackhawk.

What’s the big deal?

“So,” you may be asking, “what’s so special about the 3-screw Blackhawk?  Isn’t it just an older Blackhawk?  Why would a non-collector care about it?”
It’s true that the 3-screw Blackhawks are coveted by collectors for their age and status as the inaugural model the popular Ruger Blackhawk series (particularly the flattop 3-screws).  But what many people overlook is that the most important change that came with the New Model Blackhawk wasn’t the new innards, it was the new body the innards were put in.
Over the course of the Blackhawk’s life it had increased in size with each revamping.  In 1955 the Blackhawk was released with a grip and frame the size of the Colt Single Action Army—the gun by which all other single action revolvers are judged; a gun which had the perfect combination of size and strength for someone wanting an all-around revolver for packing into the woods or wherever he may wander; a gun which pointed so gracefully that the sights were almost unnecessary at close range.
In 1962 the “ears” were added to the Blackhawk but so was a new grip frame.  The new grip was slightly larger than the previous Blackhawk grip, and consequently, larger than the Colt’s.
Some people liked the new grip while others preferred the smaller grip found on the flattop, but the change was minor and the 1962-1972 Blackhawks still handle and point well.  Besides, replacing the larger grip frame on a Blackhawk with a smaller one is a relatively minor modification.
The blow came in 1973 when all Blackhawks were moved to the large frame originally built to contain the pressures of the .44 Magnum.  Now all Blackhawks—whether .44 Magnum, .45 Colt, or .357 Magnum—would be built on this hulking frame.
The larger frame was obviously needed to safely chamber the .44 Magnum, and the .45 Colt certainly benefited from the larger frame size as it essentially became a .45 Colt Magnum.  But the poor .357, one of the most ideal rounds for packing into the woods, receives no benefit from the larger frame at all.
The medium sized frame of the Colt Single Action Army and 3-screw Blackhawks was more than enough beef to contain .357 Magnum pressures.  Heck, the .357 Magnum is safely fired in J-Frame Smith & Wesson revolvers without fear of blowing up.  The .357 Magnum deserves better than being shoved into a bulky and heavy frame; it deserves a frame which matches the versatility of the cartridge itself; a frame which can be comfortably carried all day in the woods whether you are on the prowl for small game, large game, or even nothing at all.
Even the .45 Colt, a cartridge which had always been housed in the larger frame Blackhawks, is perfectly fine in the medium framed guns.  Sure, the .45 Colt in the large frame Blackhawks is capable of extreme power that matches or exceeds .44 Magnum, but is it really necessary?
The .45 Colt’s legacy was built on the medium framed Colt Single Action Army, where it developed a reputation for throwing heavy pieces of lead at moderate velocities.  Who could realistically need more power than a 255 grain lead bullet traveling at 900 feet per second?  Perhaps more importantly, who would want to endure the recoil associated with the increased power?
Because of the size of the 3-screw Blackhawks, they became popular platforms for people to build custom revolvers on.  The most popular customization was to rechamber the .357 3-screw Blackhawks to .44 Special—a cartridge which needs only the medium sized frame to reach its full potential and which Elmer Keith pushed to near .44 Magnum velocities in his custom Colt Single Actions.  Skeeter Skelton had at least a couple of these conversions done and it remains a popular conversion today.  If a single action aficionado is looking for a good packing or working gun, the 3-screw Blackhawk is often the revolver they turn to.

A happy ending?

Once thought to be lost forever, the medium framed Ruger revolver has made a comeback in a big way.  Starting with the introduction of the New Vaquero in 2005, Ruger put the medium sized single action frame with Colt sized grips in production.  These new guns still use a transfer bar safety and New Model Blackhawk lock work for the most part, but the important thing is that they returned to the svelte sized frame and grips of the old 3-screw Blackhawks and Colt Single Actions.  The New Vaqueros had fixed sights, so they were no replacement for the 3-screw Blackhawks, but it was an important first step.
Shortly thereafter, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first Blackhawks, Ruger released a limited run of .357 Magnum New Model Blackhawks built on the medium sized New Vaquero frame with adjustable sights and a flat top strap, finally coming full circle.  Unfortunately, this medium framed .357 Magnum New Model Blackhawk was only a limited run and today the .357 Magnum New Model Blackhawk has returned to being produced only in a large frame.
For a comparison of the sizes between the original Colt Single Action, the 3-screw Ruger Blackhawk, the New Model Ruger Blackhawk, and the newest medium frame Blackhawk, check out this article over at Gunblast.com.  They have a table with various measurements from these guns for comparison purposes.  When looking at the table, keep in mind the dimensions for the “Old Vaquero” are the same as the large frame New Model Blackhawks and the “New Vaquero” is the same size as the medium frame New Model Blackhawks.
Happily, with the help of Lipsey’s, Ruger was persuaded to introduce a .44 Special New Model Blackhawk built on the medium sized flattop frame previously used for the 50th Anniversary Blackhawk.  Lipsey’s special order of these revolvers was so successful that Ruger added the revolver to their regular product line and now they can be ordered from almost any firearms retailer.
Lipsey’s also did a special run of .45 Colt New Model Blackhawks on the medium sized flattop frame, and these can be ordered from a Lipsey’s dealer.  However, due to the success of the large frame .45 Colt Blackhawk, I don’t believe we will ever see this item as a regularly cataloged product from Ruger itself.
So, on the bright side, we now have the .44 Special New Model Blackhawk; a revolver which fires a spectacularly versatile cartridge in the handy medium sized frame.  Elmer Keith had written about his hopes for such a gun in Sixguns in 1955 and Skeeter Skelton had dreamed of such a gun as well.  Finally, fifty years after the Blackhawk was introduced, the wishes of these two men—and many other sixgun enthusiasts—came to fruition.
On the other hand, if someone wants a .357 Magnum Ruger single action revolver on the medium frame they have no viable options currently being produced.  The New Vaquero is offered in .357 Magnum and is built on the medium frame, but it lacks adjustable sights.  One is forced to look on the used market for a 3-screw Blackhawk or the 50th Anniversary New Model Blackhawk.  The Anniversary models regularly sell for more than the 3-screw Blackhawks, plus the Anniversary models only came with the 4.625 inch barrel, so the 3-screws are still the best option.
I have hopes that someday Ruger will produce the .357 Magnum New Model Blackhawk on the medium flattop frame as a regular catalog item.  After all, the medium flattop frame is already in production for the .44 Special New Model Blackhawk, the medium .357 Magnum cylinders and barrels are already in production for the New Vaquero, and the .357 Magnum has no need to be housed in a large frame revolver.  To me, it looks like all the pieces are in place and I sincerely hope that this ideal .357 Magnum revolver can somehow be produced and reclaim the romance and tradition of the 3-screw Blackhawks of old.

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Colts Patents Arms Manufacturing Company MOD.COMMANDO SPECIAL 2 INCH BARREL

Colts Patents Arms Manufacturing Company - MOD.COMMANDO SPECIAL 2 INCH BARREL NICE BORE
Colts Patents Arms Manufacturing Company - MOD.COMMANDO SPECIAL 2 INCH BARREL NICE BORE - Picture 2
Colts Patents Arms Manufacturing Company - MOD.COMMANDO SPECIAL 2 INCH BARREL NICE BORE - Picture 3
Colts Patents Arms Manufacturing Company - MOD.COMMANDO SPECIAL 2 INCH BARREL NICE BORE - Picture 4
Colts Patents Arms Manufacturing Company - MOD.COMMANDO SPECIAL 2 INCH BARREL NICE BORE - Picture 5
Colts Patents Arms Manufacturing Company - MOD.COMMANDO SPECIAL 2 INCH BARREL NICE BORE - Picture 6
Colts Patents Arms Manufacturing Company - MOD.COMMANDO SPECIAL 2 INCH BARREL NICE BORE - Picture 7
Colts Patents Arms Manufacturing Company - MOD.COMMANDO SPECIAL 2 INCH BARREL NICE BORE - Picture 8
 

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The Magic of the 6.5 Creedmoor!

 
Image result for 6.5 Creedmoor
Now I went out a few years ago and bought a nice old benchrest rifle. That someone had made up but in 8mm Mauser. Why I do not know but it is an excellent rifle.
Having heard and seen a bit about the 6.5 Creedmoor round. I decided to have it rebarreled in this new wonder round. All I can say is that I am very happy that I did so.
As it has been a real eye opener for me. In that it actually shoots even better than my 6mm Remington Benchrest Rifle. It also has given all of my rifles in 308 a big run for its money.
But enough of me bragging! I found this much better written article on the net. So I am going to let them tell this tory.
Thanks for sharing your time with me
Grumpy!
 

The Round of the Future: The 6.5 Creedmoor

The 6.5 Creedmoor isn’t a new round, it was introduced in 2007 by Hornady. But this will be remembered as the year it began its dominance in the marketplace. In reference to .308, I think the words of Winston Churchill say it best. “This is not the end, this is not even the beginning of the end, this is just perhaps the end of the beginning.”

First Impressions

I remember the first time I shot a rifle in 6.5, five years ago at Woody’s Hunting and Rifle Club, back in North Carolina. I was with my friend Damon Woodall, shooting my 18-inch LaRue in .308 preparing for a match. Damon had the first rifle I had ever seen in the new caliber, and let me try it on the same target that I had just engaged. I don’t remember exactly the distance or conditions, but I do remember: the Creedmor required a full 2 mils less in elevation and about ½ the wind hold. I had no desire to make a switch, especially given the price of factory ammo at the time. But it stuck with me, performance wise.

The 147-grain Hornady Match ammo in 6.5 Creedmoor produced roughly .75 and 1-inch groups at 100 yards.

Fast forward a few years, and here we are. In the time since, I spent a lot of hours using up my old stock, or training military guys, which is still a .308 affair. Being a retired Soldier doesn’t lend itself to a lot of frivolous purchases, and my wife is not what I would call keen on new firearms. At SHOT show last January, it seemed like every conceivable platform was chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor, from hunting rifles to ARs. My interest peaked. My first rifle review of a 6.5 was the Tikka T3 TAC A1, which performed so well, I had to buy it. At the time, I intended to at some point borrow another in .308, for a proper 6.5 Creedmoor versus .308 Win. shootout. Over the months though, I have come to realize that would be a waste of time. 6.5 Creedmoor is the winner in almost every conceivable way.

Hornady’s Development of the 6.5

Hornady’s line of American Gunner in 6.5 Creedmoor is a 140-grain boattail hollowpoint that produced .5-inch groups at 100 yards.

Hornady really crushed this one out of the park in the development of the 6.5 Creedmoor. It was designed from the ground up to be an accurate rifle round first, not a marketing gimmick. It unquestionably helps that the engineering team involved were also competitive shooters. I will leave it to the 40-pound foreheads to explain why the sectional density and shape give it a better ballistic coefficient (BC). I am content to be told it is made of magic beans. The point is, if you plug it into a ballistic calculator or use it in the real world, two things become apparent. It will out fly .308 in trajectory, and stomp it into a mud hole against the wind. That alone, however, isn’t enough. A lot of wildcat cartridges will do the same. And if I think that, why not 6mm Creedmoor, 260 Remington or 6.5x 47 Lapua instead? There are a lot of things going for those calibers too. But the decision will be made on a number of factors, most of which point to 6.5 CM.

Ballistics— American Gunner 140-grain BTHP out of a 24-in. barrel

According to their ballistic data, the Hornady 140-grain BTHP American Gunner out of a 24-inch test barrel reports these velocities. Photo Courtesy: Hornady

Ballistics— Hornady Match 147-grain ELD out of a 24-in. barrel

According to their ballistic data, the Hornady 147-grain ELD Match ammo out of a 24-inch test barrel reports these velocities. Photo Courtesy: Hornady

Benefits of the 6.5

First is price and availability. I knew 308 was finished the day I logged onto the Hornady website, and 6.5 CM was cheaper. This is usually true now across the major manufacturers if we are talking about premium ammo. You can find Winchester White box or surplus ammo cheaper by a margin, but for any precision work, it is useless. Apples to apples, match grade or hunting, 6.5 costs less nowadays. And popularity is exploding. Not only are rifles chambered in 6.5 across the board, but every brand makes ammo. If you are making a decision today, 6.5 Creedmoor is cheaper to feed than .308, and almost as available.
Second, the 6.5 Creedmoor has shown to feed as reliably from semiauto magazines as the .308. AR-10-style rifles are still not common, but they are coming. The second someone produces a semiauto that consistently shoots 1 MOA or less, .308 is finished. It recoils less, the bullet flies better, and the ammo is lighter.
The only question left, how does Creedmor do with shortened barrels? The .308 isn’t optimal out of an 18-inch barrel either, but it does work. Barrel shortening doesn’t affect all calibers equally, but it’s time to find out. If 6.5 works out of an 18-inch or a 16-inch — it’s game over. As long as it retains enough velocity to match .308, why wouldn’t you?
Article Continues Below


Third, 6.5 Creedmoor is well suited for military applications. We still don’t know the terminal effect on human beings, and that is a big question. Only combat testing will give us the answer on that. The 6.5 caliber is not without precedent in military history. The 6.5×55 Swedish is almost ballistically identical to 6.5, and was used up to World War II. It is still used to hunt reindeer and moose in Scandinavia, which means it probably packs enough wallop for bipeds. Hornady just released a 147 grain ELD round, which matches the weight of M80 ball. M80 ball is one of the most prolific .308 machine gun rounds. That means the potential exists for a 240G in the new round, something that would have to be done to phase out .308 completely. All that remains is proof of concept in tracer and armor piercing rounds.
During testing, I used my Tikka T3 TAC A1 with a Nightforce ATACR 7-35x50mm. I shot it out to 500 meters, which it produced roughly 3.5-inch groups on a target. As we all know the shooter is the weak link in any accuracy test, but I was pleased with how consistent — all it all they’re pretty impressive. Later we’re going to test the 140-grain American Gunner loads in a rifle that has a little bit fast twist rate to see if that helps stabilize them better.

Parting Shots

 
The 6.5 Creedmoor represents one of the greatest leaps forward in ballistics I have seen in my lifetime. It is a night and day difference from the .308. The 7.62x51mm won’t go extinct tomorrow, that is certain. You can buy a new rifle today in 45-70, and that has been obsolete for most applications for 100 years. But 6.5 Creedmoor is the way forward. And if you haven’t gotten on the train, it should be on your list of things to do soon.
For more information about Hornday’s 6.5 Creedmoor, click here.
To purchase a rifle chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor on GunsAmerica, click here.

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CROCODILE ROCK – WR .450 II EXPRESS RIFLE

Westley Richards Doppelbüchse Kal. .450NE #2 Bj. 1906 in absoluter LUXUSAUSFÜHRUNG
Thanks to Norbert Wenninger of Feine Jagdwaffen for the pictures!
If one needs a Rifle for hunting all big game worldwide, this Westley Richards may be first choice. The caliber .450 No 2 N.E. was introduced in 1903 as a further development of the 1898 designed .450 N.E. byRigby, which made problems after changing from Black Powder to Nitro.
Eley developed the .450 No 2 N.E. as a pure Nitro powder cartridge in modern design. The cartridge looks very impressive and is one of the longest with a case length of 82,5 mm.

Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.

This is what Westley Richards says in an expertise:
A .450 highest quality double barrel hammerless ejector rifle. It was built on the hand detachable lock action and fitted with Westley & Richards patent single selective trigger.
The stock measured 14 7/8 to centre of butt with 1 5/8 drop at comb. The rifle was completed for J.Lyon & Co, London in August 1906.”

Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.

Well, the rifle is sold – the crocodile has a comeback in Australia now….!

Westley Richards .450 highest quality barrel hammerless ejector rifle.Courtesy of N.Wenninger/Feine Jagwaffen.
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W. German Weatherby Mark V, Blue 24” in 300 Weatherby Magnum

W. German Weatherby Mark V, Blue 24” - Bolt Action Hunting Rifle & Redfield Scope MD 1965 - Picture 7
W. German Weatherby Mark V, Blue 24” - Bolt Action Hunting Rifle & Redfield Scope MD 1965 - Picture 4
W. German Weatherby Mark V, Blue 24” - Bolt Action Hunting Rifle & Redfield Scope MD 1965 - Picture 5
W. German Weatherby Mark V, Blue 24” - Bolt Action Hunting Rifle & Redfield Scope MD 1965 - Picture 6

W. German Weatherby Mark V, Blue 24” - Bolt Action Hunting Rifle & Redfield Scope MD 1965 - Picture 8

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Improve Your Glock 22’s Accuracy: Ops Armory — Captain America by CLAY MARTIN

What do you need to do a Glock to make it an awesome combat gun? Well, if you ordered it with tritium factory sights, take it out of the box and put bullets in it.
But sometimes we want something else. A gun is a very personal item to some of us, and we grow fond attachments to our favorites.
At some point in your life, you are going to want to customize one. Not because it necessarily makes it better, but because it makes it yours.
I finally cobbled together the appropriate coins earlier this year for a custom job and chose to do it to one of my Glock’s. Why my Glock? Because if the world ever turns into Mad Max land, I want my pretty gun to still be apocalypse worthy.

Ops Armory


 
 
 
 
 
 
In building a custom gun, I turned to my old friend Aaron Reed, owner of Ops Armory.
Reed, still a reserve SEAL, spent a very long time on active duty and is also a professional 3 Gun shooter on Team Bushmaster. Normally I only consult SEALs about which tanning lotion works best in the southern hemisphere, or how to maintain highlights in your hair in field conditions.
But there are exceptions. Needless to say, his gunfighter creds are legit. Unlike some custom shops, I know Reed isn’t just going for pretty aesthetics. So, I sent off my Glock 22 and gave him a blank slate. The results are spectacular.
Article Continues Below

Captain America

Ops Armory went with the Captain America theme for my Glock, fitting considering our cumulative time spent in the Department of the Defense (DOD). The finish is beautiful, a distressed American flag finish from bow to stern. Pictures do not do justice to the level of detail in the Cerakote. Reed has been in the Cerakote business for several years and has truly mastered his craft.
From top to bottom, this feels like a whole new gun. Gone are the finger grooves, cut down to a slimmer grip. The frame has been textured, all the way to forward the slide takedown lever. The trigger guard features a double undercut, both to reduce weight and give you a higher grip.
The magazine release frame area has been reduced to make it easier to reload. The frame has even been reduced around the slide takedown, making for some very good looking lines while again cutting weight. The trigger is an Ops Armory special, and easily one of the best three Glock triggers I have shot.

Check the full review of the NEW Glock Gen 5.

Up top, there is again no shortage of new. First of all, the slide was cut for an RMR, complete with a cover plate. I actually prefer the Ops Armory cut to the factory MOS. Aaron uses thicker screws, that are less likely to break, and the cut is deeper, making the sight closer to the bore line. The factory slide serrations in the rear are deepened and widened, ensuring a positive grip. Front slide serrations are also added, cut at an angle. Instead of the factory Glock roundness to the slide, it is now tri-cut. This is both an aesthetic choice and reduces weight.

Lightening The Load

On the subject of slide weight, the next part is a bit controversial. Ops Armory cuts lightening windows on top of the slide, further cutting down on weight. Is this a good idea, or simply a cool looking must have in the modern world? The answer is, I am not actually sure. I have had professional shooters I know and respect tell me they would make the slide heavier if they had a choice.
And others absolutely believe in the lightened slide school of thought. The theory is this. A lightened slide has less reciprocating mass, therefore less recoil impulse is felt. Less weight moving backward returns to target faster. The heavy slide guys say more mass absorbs more energy during the movement, results in less recoil. Which one do I believe? No idea. This is my first slide cut gun, I’ll let you know. But I do know this. If you plan to shoot one a lot that has been lightened, increase your recoil spring weight. Otherwise, over enough time, you are risking frame damage from the faster acceleration of the slide moving back. The only slide Glock ever added a lightening window too was the 34, to make the slide weight the same as a Glock 17. Probably some smarts in that somewhere. Either way, the Ops Armory one looks totally badass, and style points do count.

Lasting Impressions

All in all, I am very happy with how my Ops Armory Glock turned out. It is a beautiful gun, a conversation starter, and a tactical wonder. Why consider customization? Well, to start a better trigger can help improve accuracy. Also, as many have removed with a mere belt sander— the finger grooves on the Glock 22 Gen 3 don’t fit everyone’s hands. If you’re looking for a shop to update your current Glock and improve it, consider checking out Ops Armory. This customization project cost about $1,200, and it was worth every penny.
For more information about Glock’s lineup, click here.
For more information about Ops Armory, click here.
To purchase a Glock 22 Gen 3 on GunsAmerica, click here.

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A Website on CCW by State – Just in case you better double check it!

CONCEALED CARRY INFOGRAPHIC


THE ABILITY TO CARRY A CONCEALED FIREARM PLAYS A SIGNIFICANT ROLE IN OUR ABILITY TO DEFEND LIFE AND LIBERTY.

To help Americans navigate the complicated laws surrounding carrying concealed, we’ve developed a shareable infographic for a quick reference guide.

Do you want to know where your state falls on issuing permits, is it “shall issue” or may issue”? Do you have to notify a police officer during a traffic stop? Get fast answers to those questions and more.

*Carry laws change and vary from state to state. This infographic is for general informational purposes only.

DOWNLOAD

LET US HELP YOU FIND THE FIREARM THAT FITS YOU BEST

EXPLORE BY PURPOSE

Here is the address for it in case the other part of this did not show on the site!
Grumpy
http://www.springfield-armory.com/resources/concealed-carry-infographic/?utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=55708496&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_YIBsDEmkK13N99DfIeq3us_UmZemuLBoWX-diAqyscMC41-5U98ihgeVXWq9DI_K0cpGi_GIoxUGnlvOC9zd8LrM4LQ&_hsmi=55708496

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A Non-NFA 14” Remington 870? The New TAC-14 – Full Review! by JON HODOWAY

The Remington Tac-14 is a pump-action 12 gauge “firearm” with a 14-inch barrel and no NFA-based restrictions. It is also quite compact.
 
I have witnessed the birth of several categories of guns over the years, and the process usually follows the same path. First, the small specialty companies get in and lead the way.
Then, as sales grow with features and expectations set, the major players take note and begin offering products to the larger gun market.
The latest trend of this nature is a class of guns described as pump-action firearms (click here to see our review of the Mossberg Shockwave).
Guns that fit into this category are pump firearms with a 14-inch barrel and no stock or pistol grip, firing 12 gauge shotgun rounds, and with an overall length of more than 26 inches.

Newest Addition

Following the market into this hot new category, Remington has launched the Tac-14. Before we get too far in, let me take you through the rules that have given birth to this category:

The Tac-14 features a curved Shockwave pistol grip that helps get the firearm to an overall length of more than 26 inches for its non-NFA status.

Disclaimer: I am not an attorney, and you should not rely on my advice to make legal decisions!
Here are some important points to consider:

  • All shotguns are intended to be fired from the shoulder.
  • All shotguns must have at least an 18-inch barrel. If the gun was manufactured with a stock and a barrel shorter than 18 inches, it is classified as a “Short Barreled Shotgun” (SBS), requiring a $200.00 transfer tax.
  • If the shotgun has a pistol grip and is less than 26 inches in overall length, it is considered an “Any Other Weapon” (AOW). Good news: AOWs only require a $5 transfer tax.
  • The Tac-14 is created as follows. Start with a shotgun that has NEVER had a stock attached. Add a pistol grip, and the gun is now considered a PGO (Pistol Grip Only). It is NOT a shotgun, as it is not intended to be fired from the shoulder. Next, add a 14-inch barrel so that the overall length is 26.3 inches. The length being greater than 26 inches disqualifies the gun from being an AOW. So, the BATFE declares that you now have a “Non-NFA Firearm.”
  • The Tac-14 is not a shotgun, nor a handgun, but a firearm. It requires no special paperwork other than the 4473, and the buyer must be 21 years old. Some states may have restrictions on firearms like the Tac-14, so check your state and local laws!

Voila! You can pick up a Tac-14 today, from your local dealer, without any extra government paperwork or waiting on the BATFE to approve the transfer.
Story continues below…

The heart of the firearm is the 870 steel receiver. If you have run an 870 before, you can run this gun.

SPECS

  • Chambering: 12 Ga. (3-inch chamber)
  • Barrel: 14 inches
  • OA Length: 26.3 inches
  • Grip: Shockwave Raptor Grip
  • Sights: Bead front
  • Action: Pump
  • Finish: Black oxide
  • Capacity: 4+1
  • MSRP: $443.05

Unboxing the “Firearm”

The Tac-14 came in a small green box with the Remington logo boldly emblazoned across the side. The word “shotgun” is nowhere to be found on the label. Rather, it says “pump action firearm 12 gauge.” The gun was fully assembled in the box, with the usual cable lock, instruction manual and a prudently placed admonishment about the firearm (see below).

Note included with the Remington Tac-14.

The Tac-14 sports the Shockwave Raptor Grip. This bird’s head grip is best in class for shotguns in my opinion, and head and shoulders above the standard pistol grip affixed to most AOW and “cruiser”-style shotguns. The receiver is milled, solid steel billet, finished in Black Oxide. The 14-inch barrel will accept 2¾- or 3-inch 12-gauge ammunition. There is a bead attached to the end of the barrel—I think this is mostly because the barrel is taken from standard short-barrel 870 shotguns as it is not really of much use on this firearm. The tube magazine will hold four rounds with a fifth in the chamber. The forearm slide is covered with a Magpul M-LOK Forend; this is usually my go-to aftermarket forend. I currently have these on both of my 870 shotguns. However, in this context, I had my doubts about holding onto this short little firearm. My preferred forend for my AOW shotgun is the corncob with a nylon strap, to keep my hand in place under hard use.

The Tac-14 has a 3-inch chamber, but the author did not want to try anything heavier than 2.75-inch shells.

The author and several shooters had a lot of fun with the Tac-14, but also found that hanging on to the forend in rapid fire was a handful.

On the Range

Preparing for the range was as simple as deciding which Remington ammunition to feed the little boom stick. I settled on Remington Reduced Recoil slugs and buckshot, both in 2¾ inch. I just don’t enjoy guns that hurt, so no 3-inch shells for this guy. Hey, if that’s your bag then the Tac-14 is up for it as well as it has a 3-inch chamber.
After arriving at the range, I loaded four rounds into the magazine and cycled one into the chamber. And then, away I went! My first impression was much what I expected, as I had fired this type of gun before. Things began to change quickly as I began to push the gun for additional speed. My ability to hold on to the Magpul foregrip diminished further and further the faster I attempted to run the little Tac-14 faster and faster. The function of all the Remington bits and pieces was, as you would expect, flawless. The Raptor grip did not disappoint either; it was easy to hold and did not have a tendency to hurt the hand or wrist.
I was set to be teaching a class out of town for a week, and decided to bring along the Tac-14 and give all those willing a turn on the new gun. Over the course of the class I had a police officer, trap shooting coach, football coach, and one former marine elect to take a stab at shooting the little thunder hammer.
The shooters’ experiences were like mine; this is a gun that is decidedly fun to shoot. All the controls are familiar and easy to use. Not one person had a malfunction of any sort as the gun fed, fired and extracted without protest. However, as the rate of fire began to be pushed, the shooters’ ability to keep a firm grip on the Magpul M-LOK Forend was diminished. Eventually, you have to either shut it down or surrender your grip.

The tubular magazine has a bright orange plastic follower for high visibility.

The author really liked the Shockwave Raptor pistol grip on the Tac-14.

The Magpul forend covers the entire magazine tube and cap’s length.

Conclusions

The Tac-14 had the ability, in my mind, to be the leader of this new pack of pump-action firearms. However, if I were asked about purchasing this Remington, I would have to offer some cautions. That Magpul forend is going to get away from you if you find yourself in a situation where you have to sustain rapid fire; it’s only a matter of time. Now, this is not a semi-auto, so it is not like you have a round in the chamber as your hand comes off the forend. But, it still bears comment. I would describe it in this way: imagine a Dodge HellCat with the traction control turned off. If you push it too far it can and will get away from you, no matter how skilled or persistent you are.
Generally, this would be easily addressable on most pump-action 12 gauges. Not so with the Tac-14, as the warning in the box clearly states that modifying the gun in any way could make it into an NFA weapon. I have yet to read an ATF determination letter on what modifications they will allow before running afoul of this class of firearms. All good “loopholes” have the potential to tighten around your neck on its way through, so keep this in mind with the very interesting little Tac-14.
For more information, visit https://www.remington.com/shotguns/pump-action/model-870/model-870-tac-14.
To purchase a Remington 870 on GunsAmerica.com, click this link: https://www.gunsamerica.com/Search.aspx?Keyword=Remington%20870.