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Born again Cynic! The Horror

I just hated guys like him especially during PT in the Army!

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All About Guns Grumpy's hall of Shame Some Sick Puppies! The Horror

What happens when some fool gets hold of a good rifle, It ain't pretty folks!

I mean how hard is it to put some gun oil on a gun before storing it?
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MAUSER - 98 SPORTERIZED USED GUN INV 213155 - Picture 5
It just makes me sick to see such a nice piece get treated this way!
MAUSER - 98 SPORTERIZED USED GUN INV 213155 - Picture 6
Anyways this just blew away a huge amount of money because of this!
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MAUSER - 98 SPORTERIZED USED GUN INV 213155 - Picture 10

 

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Born again Cynic! Darwin would of approved of this! Grumpy's hall of Shame The Horror This great Nation & Its People

Sad news!

LIFE EXPECTANCY DROPS IN U.S. DUE TO A JOYLESS ANGLO CULTURE

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Life expectancy is now dropping in America thanks to a culture that has created an epidemic of suicides and overdoses

Life expectancy only rose during the 20th century in America and the rest of the world, as did the material quality of life. As Americans ushered in a new century, there was optimism that life expectancy would only continue to rise in the 21st century.
That optimism was misplaced. AP reports people are offing themselves at a record pace, driving down the life expectancy in this declining nation:

The suicide death rate last year was the highest it’s been in at least 50 years, according to U.S. government records. There were more than 47,000 suicides, up from a little under 45,000 the year before.

The AFP news agency also chimed in with their own doleful statistics:

The drug overdose rate rose 9.6 percent compared to 2016, while suicides climbed 3.7 percent, said the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics.

The drug overdose rate is so high, more Americans die every single year than died during the totality of the 20-year long Vietnam War. Much of the problem comes from prescription opioids, and not the oft-villainized street drugs America has waged an all-out (and unsuccessful) holy war against since the 1970s.
Put these two sets of statistics together, and one can glean America’s native Anglo culture is so miserable major impacts on the population are occurring. AFP fills us in on how dire the situation is:

As a result, the average life span in America dropped to “78.6 years, a decrease of 0.1 year from 2016,” said the report.

As life expectancy has now started to decline, the geniuses at the CDC and in the mainstream media are miffed. They can’t seem to figure out why people are now killing themselves in droves and overdosing on drugs trying to escape reality.
A decrease of 0.1 years in life expectancy might not seem like much. But, it usually takes plagues or wars to bring about such a dip.

“We’ve never really seen anything like this,” said Robert Anderson, who oversees CDC death statistics. Anderson said declines like this haven’t been seen since the great flu pandemic of 1918 and World War I.

Watching the carefully polished public relations imagery America broadcasts of itself to the world, one couldn’t imagine people would be desperately grasping at something – anything – to escape the reality of living in this supposed paradise on earth.
Why would people be trying to escape by taking massive quantities of drugs and/or putting their head in a noose?
I’ll tell you why. Anglo culture, quite simply is a living hell. The America the world sees on TV is nothing but a lie. The reality: People are overworked, undersexed, bombarded with divisive politics around the clock, micromanaged by not only a Nanny State but overbearing corporate policy, fed a steady diet of trashy food, brainwashed into chasing illusions they can never make into reality, buried under a mountain of debt they can never pay off, suffering a sustained decline in their standard of living, witnessing a breakdown of the family and local communities the likes of which the world has never seen, and are now being told male and female genders are a thing of the past.
This, on top of having their entertainments limited to shopping, eating out, porn, and Netflix. Oh, and living in a police state morphing into a panopticon surveillance state in which everything has been made illegal except going to work, paying taxes, and doing exactly what you’re told when you’re told to do it. A nation where Big Brother is increasingly always watching.
Like those who commit suicide or overdose on drugs, all I can think about is a way out of this place when I’m here. When I’m back in what many of us call “The Matrix” scraping out some money to leave for happier destinations abroad, I frequently find myself murmuring, “I hate this fucking place.” Perhaps because I know there are better places. Most Americans don’t. They’re brainwashed into believing this dystopia is the best the world has to offer. It ain’t, folks. You really need to fucking get out more.
Meantime, those of us who know something is very, very wrong with this culture are being proven right by such statistics. Rather than saying this nation might need to ease up on people and let them reclaim some of their lives and freedom, we instead are treated to more boilerplate from the CDC. Boilerplate that offers no viable solutions:

“We are losing too many Americans, too early and too often, to conditions that are preventable,” Dr. Robert Redfield, the CDC’s director, said in a statement.

Redfield laments the problem but points no fingers. The CDC is located at the intersection of the corporate-government complex, so don’t expect them to say slave-driving corporations and a tyrannical government are the root causes of such widespread misery.
Unfortunately, statistics painting such a grim picture aren’t blips on the radar, either. A long-term downward trend in life expectancy is beginning. Continuing from AFP:

Overall, the statistics show a “downward trend in life expectancy since 2014,” a time period in which Americans have lost 0.3 years of life, he told AFP, describing the trend as “very concerning.”

At least one so-called “expert” echoes our claims about how miserable America has become:

CDC officials did not speculate about what’s behind declining life expectancy, but Dr. William Dietz, a disease prevention expert at George Washington University, sees a sense of hopelessness.
Financial struggles, a widening income gap and divisive politics are all casting a pall over many Americans, he suggested. “I really do believe that people are increasingly hopeless, and that that leads to drug use, it leads potentially to suicide,” he said.

Did you notice Dietz equates money with happiness, like a true ‘Murican who can’t see past the economy. He, like so many lost souls equates getting and spending money on worthless junk and poorly made restaurant meals as the be all, end all of existence. Indoctrination works.
Happiness is deeper than dollars and cents, bro. And doesn’t come from voting the right candidates into office, either. But, Dietz is right about one thing. I feel hopeless when I’m here. Do you?
All it took for me to feel happy and whole again was a recent 10-day trip out of Anglo America to my oasis of humanity in the Old World culture of Latin America. The year I spent living abroad and the months I’ve spent in South America and Asia are the happiest memories of my adult life. I’ve often wondered, if I didn’t have that release in my life – the female attention in particular – would I have ended up one of the statistics in this report?

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Darwin would of approved of this! Dear Grumpy Advice on Teaching in Today's Classroom Hard Nosed Folks Both Good & Bad Leadership of the highest kind The Green Machine The Horror War

A Great Example of panic looks like!

Now a lot of folks think that panic means a person running around like a chicken with its head chopped off. Now based on my experience.
It mostly is not. Instead it takes the form of the mind just shutting down from the over flow of information & raw fear. The bottom line is that it takes a lot of guts to summon forth from that inner bank to over come this.
For Example, The Spanish have a saying. “He was brave that day”. Meaning that courage is not a inexhaustible well. That it can & will run dry. If not given time to recover & regroup once in a while.
Also sadly a large proportion of the population. Do NOT have a huge amount of this inner strength needed. Otherwise the Army or Marine Corp would not need a large NCO & Officer Corp.
The Army started to learn this during the true Holocaust of WWI. When it began to run into what is now called P.T.S.D. or as I like to call it Combat Fatigue.
This problem started when a large number of troops basically broke down mentally. After X amount of days on the front line.
It was also calculated that if even the most stout hearted trooper survived that long. Almost all troops would have a complete Mental Breakdown after a year of combat experience.
Anyways this is what I think happened at Foy. That & Winters did as usual the right thing. Grumpy

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Anti Civil Rights ideas & "Friends" Born again Cynic! California Grumpy's hall of Shame The Horror The Horror!

God help Us out here in California!

Image result for Governor of California

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Born again Cynic! The Horror Well I thought it was funny!

Yes, we hear you!

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Born again Cynic! Cops Dear Grumpy Advice on Teaching in Today's Classroom Grumpy's hall of Shame Gun Info for Rookies Hard Nosed Folks Both Good & Bad Stand & Deliver The Horror

Of course we all know this- From the Feral Irishman

My “in” box filled up on Thursday with questions, after the shooting that took place at a Country music bar out in California Wednesday night. Well, let me clarify that. 99% of them were questions/comments and about 1% were rants about how we need more gun controls.
Most of the questions came from people asking if there’s anything you can do in a situation like that. The answer is yes, to some extent.
The answer SHOULD be that no mentally ill person even attempts such a thing, because everyone behind the bar, and every “bouncer” has a concealed weapon on them, and have been trained how to use them. A sign on the door should read that all employees are armed and trained. Unfortunately, that’s just a dream.
Mass shooters do NOT frequent places where they know the people are armed. There’s no active shooters at gun shows. None at gun ranges. None in police stations. You know the reason why. They can’t get their ten minutes of fame when 20 people blast them to pieces after they fire their first shot. No, they go exactly where our stupid laws TELL them to go.
Gun free zones are hunting preserves for the Mentally ill. Period. This isn’t rocket science folks. Think about it logically for just 2 silly minutes and you’ll know I’m right.
If I somehow snapped my lid and decided I want to go out blazing and taking 20 people with me, where would I go to achieve the best success? Would I go to the hunting and fishing expo, where upwards of 100 people might be carrying a concealed weapon? Probably not. You know that.
Of course he’s going to go to the school. The college. The nightclub. All places where normal law abiding folks are barred from carrying their weapons.
And, it works. It works because he knows he’s got between 5 and 9 minutes to shoot the hell out of people before the police get there. So, he marches in, sees 200+ people enjoying themselves and for what ever evil went berserk in his mind, he starts mowing them down. They are absolutely defenseless. Fish in a barrel.
Now, the lowest hanging fruit for those that don’t want to spend the time to realize the reality of things, is to push for either more gun laws, or outright gun bans. It’s so perfect in their minds. Make everyone turn in their guns,and outlaw them. See, problem solved! Except the problem isn’t solved. For one, you still have a mentally deranged evil person that wants to kill people.
Remember a while ago the spat of “truck killings?” where they were simply using trucks to run over people on sidewalks? Just last year, some lunatic used a moving truck on a bike path in NY and killed 8, wounding 30. The year before in Ohio another evil scum ran over 4, and then got out and started slashing people with knives. Evil people will find a way to do their deeds.
In London, it is virtually impossible to get or own a gun. In fact, not only have they banned guns in England for years, two years ago they banned “knives”. So how is this happening:
LONDON is experiencing a horrifying rise in violent crime, with 100 suspected murders in the capital since the start of the year.The total number of offences involving a knife or bladed instrument that have been recorded by cops in the year to March 2018 rose to 40,147, a seven-year-high.There was also a two per cent spike in the number of gun-related crimes too – that is now at 6,492.
Excuse me? Aren’t knives and guns banned in London? Indeed they are. Did it stop 40 THOUSAND knife assaults and over 6 THOUSAND gun related crimes? No.
And therein lies the problem with the low hanging fruit idea of outlawing, or banning guns. It doesn’t work. But wait, consider this. England has never been a “gun” country. The population was never very free to own guns, and only hunters and collectors would usually go through the hoops to obtain one.
But here in the states? Guns have been a part of rural America for 200 years. Remember the Christmas cards of Grandpa’s fireplace with the rifle hanging on the hooks above it, and a cozy fire burning?
That wasn’t fantasy, that was just a look into “every home” USA 80 years ago. Kids in the 50’s often had marksmanship classes at school. Kids in the 30’s often had to hunt rabbits and squirrel and deer, etc, to help put food on the table.
There’s an estimated 500 million guns in the US. I think that number is ridiculously low, but let’s use it anyway. Until 1968, you could buy a gun by mail order.
Read that again. Mail order. No back ground checks, no registrations, no records, nothing. So where are they coming up with their numbers, when there’s no way to know who bought what back then?
Or consider “bring backs”. In WWII tens of thousands (more) of our soldiers brought back German Lugers and Walters. These didn’t get registered anywhere. Who knows how many of them are still floating around.
So problem 1 is that guns are like drugs. They’re everywhere. They’re in uncle Joe’s attic, and Grandma’s basement. No matter how illegal you make them, I could find you one in ten minutes. Just like crack, coke, heroin, fentanyl, etc is illegal, I could get you any of it within the hour.
Problem 2 of course is that only law abiding citizens abide the law. Duh. So, they pass a gun ban, only the good people turn them in, the bad guys of course don’t, and they get to go play their evil games, knowing no one’s going to be shooting back at them.
We are way way past the idea that banning anything is going to stop evil people. This shooting happened in California. Very tough gun laws. It’s said he had extended magazines. They’re illegal in CA. Did it stop him from getting one? Did it stop him from breaking the law? Please.
So what’s the answer? Is there one? Well to start, I’d like to see all the states go back to spending a lot of their budget on mentally diseased people. Somehow we got civilized and did away with “Mental institutions.”
Now those people walk among us, often jazzed up on a cocktail of antidepressants and God knows what else. One of pharma’s dirty little secrets is that almost 95% of these kind of events finds the person has been using mood altering pharmaceuticals. Let’s start by getting people that need help, the help they need.
Of the 67 ‘shooters” in the last 30 years, 65 had been treated for mental issues. Let that sink in folks
The gun didn’t shoot those people. The person brandishing the gun shot those people. Since guns will always be available, no matter what laws come down the pike, why not work on the person that wants one to commit his evil?
Beyond that, things get messy. Why do I say messy? Because it will take a huge shift in societal thinking to put an end to these sort of events.
Consider this:
Two trends:
1930-1960-most mass shootings were familicides and felony related killings.
1960-present-most mass shootings are in public places against unknown bystanders.
Or this:
Mass shootings in America
By decade:
1900s:0
1910s:2
1920s:2
1930s:9
1940s:8
1950s:1
1960s:6
1970s:13
1980s:32
1990s:42
2000s:28
2010- present 54 so far
For 50 years, we didn’t have issues with mass shooting. Then starting in the 70’s (AFTER Gun registration became law!) they started soaring.
Why? Was it that gun education was removed from schools? Could be.
Was it the gradual breakdown of the nuclear family? Could be.
Was it the loss of mental illness funding? Could be.
Could it be the amount of anti-depressants that started rolling out about then?
Could be. Was it removing “God” from the school? Could be. It could be all that and much much more.
Look at the decade of the 50’s. There was one mass shoot situation.
What was different about life in the 50’s? Everything. Literally everything. June Cleaver hung at home, always nicely dressed while raising the boys. Ward made sure there was discipline in the home. Men went to sporting events wearing jackets and ties. People were civil to each other. One paycheck paid the bills. I could go on for ever.
Well this isn’t the 50’s and I don’t suppose we’re ever going there again. Today’s society is broken in a million different ways. Each year brings more violence, more insanity, more drugs.
With the left taking over the House, they’ve made it clear that they’re going for the low hanging fruit. “Gun control” is big on their list. This is a Headline from the Wall Street Journal on Saturday:
WASHINGTON-Democrats say they will pass the most aggressive gun-control legislation in decades when they become the House majority in January, plans they renewed this week in the aftermath of a mass killing in a California bar.
It’s coming folks. One thing I have to give the left credit for, is that they never stop. Ever. If they have a desire, they work toward it hard and long. They’ve wanted everyone disarmed and continue to work toward that goal.
Okay, so what could you have done in that bar? The answer unfortunately is not much. Even if you’re a legal concealed weapons carrier, most states have laws stating that you can’t carry in a bar. In the case of California, the law states:
While exercising the privileges granted to the licensee under the terms of this license, the licensee shall not, when carrying a concealed weapon:
* Consume any alcoholic beverage.
Be in a place having a primary purpose of dispensing alcoholic beverages for on-site consumption.
So as you can see, a law abiding person with a valid permit couldn’t legally have his weapon in the Country music bar.
The shooter knew this, that’s why he went there. I so suppose that if a couple patrons of that bar had “broken the law” and carried their weapons in that bar that night, the outcome would have been different. But there’s the rub. Most Concealed weapons folks are incredibly law abiding.
So, since you can’t carry there, your choices are extremely limited when the shooter starts shooting.
First and foremost is situational awareness. I’ve mentioned this in previous letters, try and determine “exits” when you first enter any place. I like to know where the fire exits are, and I often make seating decisions around them.
If you hear a gunshot in a store, restaurant, grocery, bar, etc, GET MOVING.
There is NEVER a time when it’s okay to hear a gun shot in any of those places. If you hear one, you’ll probably hear many more soon. Get out as fast as you can.
Try your best NOT to head toward the main entrance if possible. There’s going to be a stampede trying to get out of there, and you could get trampled, or worse, the shooter might enjoy having 25 or 30 people stacked up in one spot that he can mow down.
Again, try fire escapes, or something else. If there’s a kitchen, you can almost always rely on their being a door to the outside for deliveries, etc. Head there.
If you’re in a big place, and the shooting is going on quite a distance from you, please realize that you are free to do any damned thing you can to get safe.
If that means picking up your chair and hurtling it through the front windows to get out, well so be it. They have insurance for their windows.
Proximity to the shooter will play the biggest role in your decision. If you remember nothing else in this article, remember this fact “Distance is your friend.”
Again, if you’re seated near an exit, and you’ve been smart enough to sit “facing the crowd, or entrance” and you hear shots or see someone walking in with a gun drawn, get moving.
But what if it doesn’t play out that way? What if our shooter kept his weapon in his jacket, until he was snuggled up to the bar, the same bar you’re sitting at just feet away?
At that point your choices get slim and ugly. Your first instinct will be to dive to the floor, or get behind cover. That’s a decent first reaction, but you can’t stay there.
You’re still going to want to use that cover for just long enough that you can make a break for a get away. These people get their jollies shooting people curled up in a ball under a table. Always be thinking about running.
What you need is distance more than anything. At 15 feet, it takes just a 5 degree cant of the weapon to miss you. Yes you read that right.
At 15 feet, if this guy puts his front site on your heart, but just wobbles that gun 5 degrees right or left, he misses you completely.
At 20 feet it’s even harder for him. So while cover is good to initially not get shot, the further away you can get, as quickly as you can, increases your survival by multiples.
Being unarmed in an active shooter situation is about as butt ugly as it gets.
Try and remember these basics, and you’ll have a better chance.
1) at the first hint of a shooting (like you hear one shot go off) DO NOT sit there and look around wondering what’s happening. Don’t pull out your phone and take video’s.
2) you want OUTSIDE and you want it as fast as you can get it. Get there any way you can, fire exit, kitchen door, break a window, etc.
3) distance is your best friend. If you can blend some distance, WITH some cover, you’re gold. ( for instance you make a move across the floor to a ceiling support column. Angle your next run away from the shooter by trying to keep that support column angled between him and you as you’re running)
Finally, there’s the run and hide idea.
That’s the worst one and only useful if there’s absolutely no way to get outside. The problem is that we don’t just want to run and hide in the building, because he might play “hide and seek”.
If ten people pile into the men’s room, this guys got a fish in the barrel game to play. The only way run and hide works is if you can run, hide AND DELAY this nut from coming in.
That’s easy in say a classroom, you can pile up desks, and file cabinets, etc. But in a bar bathroom? Not so easy.
It’s not 1950 any more folks. Learn to be aware of your surroundings. The worlds gone crazy, and it’s getting worse.
Stay safe.

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Ammo Grumpy's hall of Shame The Horror

Wayne-county-commissioner-introduces-ammunition-control/#ixzz5WnJ1oWvE Under Creative Commons License: Attribution Follow us: @Ammoland on Twitter | Ammoland on Facebook Wayne County Commissioner Introduces Ammunition Control Ammoland Inc. Posted on September 18, 2018 by John Crump

Nine 9mm Ammo Brass AmmunitionWayne County Commissioner Introduces Ammunition Control
Detroit, Michigan –-(Ammoland.com)- Wayne County commissioner Reggie Davis decided that since he can’t ban guns due to the Second Amendment, he would go after ammunition sales.
Davis is proposing new rules for the purchase of ammunition in Wayne County.
Wayne County is the most populous county in Michigan. It is home to 1.7 million people and includes the city of Detroit. The county encompasses a total area of 673 square miles.
Davis’s “bullet bill” ordinance would require law enforcement approval before a buyer could purchase ammunition. The buyer would also have to go through a mental screening to qualify to buy ammo. The buyer would need to repeat these steps for each new ammunition purchase. The purchaser would be forced to cover the cost of the screening.
Gun shows would be exempt, but the buyer would still have to produce a non-expired certificate from a mental health screening stating that they are eligible to purchase ammunition.

“We’re up against some state and federal laws. Even if it takes me going to lobby in D.C., and I expect it will, we need to make these changes,” Davis told the Detroit Free Press.

Not only will Davis’s “bullet bill” increase the cost and time that it would take a consumer to buy ammunition by forcing them to go through a mental background check, but the bill would also put a new tax on all ammo sold to customers.

According to Davis, the money collected via the tax would go to teach students “about the second amendment, about how to use a gun safely and about gun violence.”

Davis does not believe his legislation be to unconstitutional. Although he does expect resistance from pro-gun groups like the NRA, he considers his proposal as a common-sense reform. He also states that he is a believer in the Second Amendment and has respect for groups such as the NRA.
Davis hopes to work with the NRA to find a compromise that would be agreeable to all parties. So far, the NRA does not have a public stance on the “bullet bill.” This lack of a stance is most likely due to the newness of the proposed legislation.
Davis was a gun owner who claimed to own Glocks, sawed-off shotguns, and sniper rifles. An assailant shot and killed Davis’s brother. This experience set Davis off on his crusade for gun reform. Davis no long owns any firearms.
Others do not share Davis’s opinion that this move is constitutional and sees other motives for the ordinance including continued racism by the Democratic party.

“As the President of the National Federation of Republican Assemblies who happens to be on the NRA Board, I’ll call this what it is. This is clear and obvious racism by Democrats running Wayne County on behalf of the progressive socialist political agenda,” National Federation of Republican Assemblies President Willes Lee told AmmoLand. “Heck, this is economic discrimination, hitting friends who most need self-protection and can least afford this proposed so-called ‘public safety’ measure.”

Lee went on to tell AmmoLand, “Our Second Amendment ‘Shall Not Be Infringed’ does not include law-abiding neighbors paying for forced mental evaluations by progressive doctors to exercise our God-given right of self-defense. It does not include Wayne County’s liberal law enforcement granting ‘approval’ of good folks’ right to defend their life. ‘Shall not be infringed’ does not include or even imply an additional tax on those least able to afford it, taking food off their table, to defend their children and property.”
Lee is not alone in his beliefs. AmmoLand spoke to Gun Owners of America Director of Communications Jordan Stein about the proposal. He too does not believe it to be constitutional.

“Just as firearms are protected under the Second Amendment, ammunition is secured as well,” Stein told AmmoLand. “As every other prior restraint on the Second Amendment, this proposed gun control will be ignored by criminals and make it harder for honest people to defend themselves.”

AmmoLand reached out to Davis to get a comment about how this proposal would hurt poor shooters from places like the inner city of Detroit more than shooters from the middle-class suburbs, but Davis did not return our request for comment as of the time of this writing.


About John CrumpJohn Crump
John is a NRA instructor and a constitutional activist. He is the former CEO of Veritas Firearms, LLC and is the co-host of The Patriot News Podcast which can be found at www.blogtalkradio.com/patriotnews. John has written extensively on the patriot movement including 3%’ers, Oath Keepers, and Militias. In addition to the Patriot movement, John has written about firearms, interviewed people of all walks of life, and on the Constitution. John lives in Northern Virginia with his wife and sons and is currently working on a book on leftist deplatforming methods and can be followed on Twitter at @crumpyss, on Facebook at realjohncrump, or at www.crumpy.com.

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Allies Cops Fieldcraft Hard Nosed Folks Both Good & Bad Soldiering Stand & Deliver The Horror War

Some seriously bad ass Cops in the worst Neighborhood in the World

“WE TRY TO LEARN EVERY TERRORIST ATTACK”: INSIDE THE TOP-SECRET ISRAELI ANTI-TERRORISM OPERATION THAT’S CHANGING THE GAME

Governments around the world are quietly turning to YAMAM, Israel’s special police force, for help with their most intractable security problems. And now, elite commandos publicly reveal the tactics that have made it one of the most fearsome counterterrorism units in the world.
Tel Aviv, Israel. December 2017. YAMAM rappellers simulate retaking a skyscraper from terrorists.
Video still by Adam Ciralsky.

I PURSUED MY ENEMIES AND OVERTOOK THEM; I DID NOT TURN BACK UNTIL THEY WERE DESTROYED. —PSALM 18:37 (MOTTO OF ISRAEL’S CLANDESTINE COUNTERTERROR SQUAD)

On a spring evening in late April, I traveled to a fortified compound in the Ayalon Valley between Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. The location is not identified on Waze, the Israeli-built navigation tool, and so, as far as my app-addled cabdriver was concerned, it does not exist.

Then again, the same could be said for its inhabitants: YAMAM, a band of counter terror operatives whose work over the last four decades has been shrouded in secrecy.

Upon arrival at the group’s headquarters, which has all the architectural warmth of a supermax, I made my way past a phalanx of Israeli border police in dark-green battle-dress uniforms and into a blastproof holding pen where my credentials were scanned, my electronic devices were locked away, and I received a lecture from a counter-intelligence officer who was nonplussed that I was being granted entrée to the premises. “Do not reveal our location,” he said. “Do not show our faces. And do not use our names.”

Then he added, grimly, and without a hint of irony, “Try to forget what you see.”

YAMAM is the world’s most elite—and busiest—force of its kind, and its expertise is in high demand in an era when ISIS veterans strike outside their remaining Middle East strongholds and self-radicalized lone wolves emerge to attack Western targets. “Today, after Barcelona,” says Gilad Erdan, who for the past three years has been Israel’s minister for public security, “after Madrid, after Manchester, after San Bernardino—everyone needs a unit like YAMAM.” More and more, the world’s top intelligence and police chiefs are calling on YAMAM (a Hebrew acronym that means “special police unit”). During his first month on the job, recalls Erdan, “I got requests from 10 countries to train together.”

I made my way to the office of YAMAM’s 44-year-old commander, whose name is classified. I am therefore obliged to refer to him by an initial, “N,” as if he were a Bond character. N’s eyes are different colors (the result of damage sustained during a grenade blast). His shaved head and hulking frame give him the vibe of a Jewish Vin Diesel. At his side, he keeps an unmuzzled, unbelievably vicious Belgian shepherd named Django.

I made my way to the office of YAMAM’s 44-year-old commander, whose name is classified. I am therefore obliged to refer to him by an initial, “N,” as if he were a Bond character. N’s eyes are different colors (the result of damage sustained during a grenade blast).

His shaved head and hulking frame give him the vibe of a Jewish Vin Diesel. At his side, he keeps an unmuzzled, unbelievably vicious Belgian shepherd named Django.

Near Tel Aviv, Israel. March 1978. The aftermath of a bus assault by P.L.O. guerrillas, which claimed the lives of 37 Israelis and wounded 71.

Photograph by Shmuel Rachmani/AP Images.

Last fall, Israeli officials agreed to provide Vanity Fair unprecedented access to some of YAMAM’s activities, facilities, and undercover commandos.

When I asked N why his superiors had chosen to break with their predecessors’ decades of silence, he gave an uncharacteristically sentimental response: “It’s important for operators’ families to hear about our successes.” (Field “operators,” as they are called, are exclusively male; women sometimes serve in intelligence roles.) N does not discount less magnanimous reasons for cooperating, however.

First, YAMAM has devised new methodologies for responding to terrorist incidents and mass shootings, which it is sharing with its counterparts across the globe. (More on this shortly.) Second, Israel, as an occupying power, faces international condemnation for its heavy-handed approach toward the Palestinians; as a result, some top officials evidently felt it was time to reveal the fact that governments—including a few of Israel’s more vocal critics on the world stage—often turn to them, sotto voce, for help with their most intractable security problems. And last come the bragging rights—perhaps the unit’s most meaningful rationale.

YAMAM, it so happens, recently won a bitter, 40-year bureaucratic battle with Sayeret Matkal, a secretive special-forces squad within the Israel Defense Forces (I.D.F.). Sayeret Matkal was formerly the ne plus ultra in this realm; indeed, Vanity Fair, in an article published right after the 9/11 attacks, called the group “the most effective counterterrorism force in the world.”

It counts among its alumni political leaders, military generals, and key figures in Israel’s security establishment. And yet, when Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, a Sayeret Matkal veteran, had to quietly designate one unit to be the national counterterror A-team, he chose YAMAM over his old contingent, which specializes in long-distance reconnaissance and complex overseas missions.

Netanyahu’s decision, supported by some of the prime minister’s fiercest foes, had all the sting of President Barack Obama’s selection of the navy’s SEAL Team Six (over the army’s Delta Force) to conduct the 2011 raid on Osama bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. YAMAM is part of the national police force—not the military or the Mossad, which is Israel’s C.I.A., or the Shin Bet, the country’s domestic-security service, which is more akin to Britain’s M.I.5.

And yet, in recent months, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has blurred some of the lines between these agencies’ duties. YAMAM’s primary focus involves foiling terror plots, engaging militants during attacks, combating crime syndicates, and blunting border incursions.

In contrast, the military, in addition to protecting Israel’s security, is often called upon to respond to West Bank demonstrations, using what human-rights activists often consider excessive force. But as Hamas has continued to organize protests along the fence that separates Israel and Gaza, I.D.F. snipers have been killing Palestinians, who tend to be unarmed.

What’s more, Hamas has sent weaponized kites and balloons into Israel, along with mortar and rocket barrages, prompting devastating I.D.F. air strikes. While members of the YAMAM have participated in these missions as well, they have largely played a secondary role.

Off and on for a year, I followed N and his team as they traveled, trained, and exchanged tactics with their American, French, and German counterparts on everything from retaking passenger trains to thwarting complex attacks from cadres of suicide bombers and gunmen firing rocket-propelled grenades.

YAMAM’s technology, including robots and Throwbots (cameras housed in round casings that upright themselves upon landing), is dazzling to the uninitiated. But so are the stats: YAMAM averages some 300 missions a year.

According to N, his commandos have stopped at least 50 “ticking time bombs” (suicide bombers en route to their targets) and hundreds of attacks at earlier stages.

“I’ve been out with the YAMAM on operations,” John Miller, the New York Police Department’s deputy commissioner of intelligence and counterterrorism, told me in his office, a few blocks from the World Trade Center. “There are a lot of outfits that have a lot of knowledge and do a lot of training, but that’s different from a lot of experience.” He pointed out that for every terrorist attack in Israel that makes the news, there are 10 that are prevented by YAMAM acting on perishable intelligence provided by Shin Bet.

Avi Dichter agrees wholeheartedly. After serving in Sayeret Matkal, he joined the Shin Bet and in 2000 rose to become its director. He now chairs the Committee on Defense and Foreign Affairs in the Knesset, Israel’s parliament.

For years, he admitted, counterterrorism officials shared only a portion of their most sensitive intelligence with covert operatives, out of fear of its being compromised.

Now, Dichter says, YAMAM representatives sit in Shin Bet’s war room to ensure they have the full picture. “It took us a long time to understand that you can’t keep information from the unit you’re asking to perform a mission, because what they don’t know may undermine the entire operation.”

When I asked him how he would describe the unit to outsiders, he said, “YAMAM is a special-operations force that has the powers of the police, the capabilities of the military, and the brains of Shin Bet.” They are, in effect, the spy agency’s soldiers.

NOWADAYS, SOME TERRORISTS AREN’T INTERESTED IN NEGOTIATIONS OR EVEN SURVIVAL.

The N.Y.P.D.’s Miller, for his part, claimed U.S. law-enforcement agencies benefit from YAMAM’s successes. A former journalist, who once interviewed bin Laden, Miller maintained, “You can learn a lot from the YAMAM about tactics, techniques, and procedures that, when adapted, can work in any environment, including New York.

It’s why we go to Israel once or twice a year—not just to see what we’ve seen before but to see what we’ve seen before that they’re doing differently. Because terrorism, like technology—and sometimes because of technology—is constantly evolving. If you’re working on the techniques you developed two years ago, you’re way out of date.”

Kirstjen Nielsen, Trump’s secretary of Homeland Security, concurs: “We have a lot to learn from [Israel—YAMAM in particular] in terms of how they use technology as a force multiplier to combat an array of threats. Over the last 15 years, we at D.H.S. have partnered with them on almost every threat.”

A NEW PARADIGM

“I saw a few Hollywood movies about fighting terrorism and terrorists,” N said. “But the reality is beyond anything you can imagine.” Back in the States, I trailed him and his entourage, who met with the L.A. County Sheriff’s Department’s Special Enforcement Bureau, as well as New York City’s Emergency Service Unit, which falls under Miller. “Terror organizations used to take hostages because they wanted to achieve a prisoner exchange; now they’re trying to do something different,” N observed, remembering a bygone era when terrorism was a violent means of achieving more concrete political ends.

The conventional wisdom for how to deal with fast-moving terrorist incidents has evolved over time, most notably in hostage situations. Since the 1960s and 70s, first responders have sought to establish a physical boundary to “contain” an event, engage the perpetrators in dialogue, draw out negotiations while formulating a rescue plan, then move in with a full team. Similar principles were adapted for reacting to kidnappers, emotionally disturbed individuals, and mass-casualty incidents.

But over the last 20 years—a period that dovetails with N’s rise from recruit to commander—he and his colleagues have come to treat terror attacks the way doctors treat heart attacks and strokes. There is a golden window in which to intervene and throw all their energy and resources at the problem.

While units in the U.S. have tended to arrive on the scene, gauge the situation, secure a perimeter, and then call in specialists or reinforcements, YAMAM goes in heavy, dispatching self-contained squadrons of breachers, snipers, rappellers, bomb techs, dog handlers, and hostage negotiators.

Metaphorically speaking, they don’t send an ambulance to stabilize a patient for transport. They send a hospital to ensure survival on scene. Moreover, they establish mobile units with clear lines of authority, not an array of groups with competing objectives. These teams can rove and respond, and are not unduly tethered to a central command base.

“The active shooter changed everything,” John Miller elaborated. Nowadays, the terrorist or mass murderer isn’t interested in negotiations or even survival. “He is looking for maximum lethality and to achieve martyrdom in many cases.”

Because of this, the response teams’ priorities have shifted. The primary objective, said Miller, echoing YAMAM’s strategy, “is to stop the killing. That means to use the first officers on the scene whether they’re specialized or not. The other part is to stop the dying.

How do you then set parameters inside as the people are chasing the threat, going after the sound of gunfire, engaging the gunman? How do you get to those people who are wounded, who are still viable, who could survive?

American law enforcement has struggled with [this] since the Columbine case”—when responders waited too long to storm in. “We’ve got to get inside within 20 minutes. It can’t be within the golden two hours—or it’s not golden.”

Major O, the 37-year-old who commands YAMAM’s sniper team, explained that one of the unit’s signature skills is getting into the assailant’s mind-set. “We try to learn every terrorist attack everywhere in the world to find out how we can do it better,” he noted. “Our enemies are very professional, too, and in the end they are learning. They try to be better than us.”

To maintain its edge, YAMAM, after analyzing far-flung incidents, fashions its training to address possible future attacks.

In the time that I spent with the operators, they rappelled down a Tel Aviv skyscraper and swooped into an office dozens of floors below, testing alternative ways that responders might have confronted last year’s Las Vegas attack in which a lone gunman on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel fired more than a thousand rounds at concertgoers, killing 58.

A YAMAM squad also spent hours on a dimly lit platform taking over a stationary Israeli passenger train—alongside members of France’s elite Groupe d’Intervention de la Gendarmerie Nationale. (The French had come to Israel, in part, to practice such maneuvers, evidently mindful of 2015’s Thalys rail attack, which recently found its way to the big screen in Clint Eastwood’s The 15:17 to Paris).

And at a telecommunications facility north of Tel Aviv, Israeli operatives simulated a nighttime mission with Germany’s vaunted Grenzschutzgruppe 9, facing multiple gunmen and explosions in all directions. Taking it all in, I felt like I had unwittingly been cast as an extra in a Michael Bay movie.

As they briefed their European guests, the YAMAM team preached its gospel of never allowing the perfect to be the enemy of the good. “To be relevant and to win this battle, sometimes you must go with 50 percent or 70 percent knowledge and intelligence,” N said.

As he considered what his counterparts faced at places such as Orlando’s Pulse nightclub or the Bataclan concert hall, in Paris, N asserted that in today’s scenarios, unlike those in the 20th century, “we don’t have the privilege of time. You must come inside very fast because there are terrorists that are killing hostages every minute.”

Dimona, Israel. March 1988. The so-called Mothers’ Bus attack, in which three nuclear-research workers were executed by P.L.O. terrorists.

From Polaris.

THE SECOND DIRECTIVE

The inside story of YAMAM’s genesis has not been told by its leaders, until now.

In 1972, during the Summer Olympics in Munich, members of the Palestinian group Black September kidnapped and murdered 11 Israeli teammates.

The cold-blooded attack—and Germany’s botched response—prompted Israel’s prime minister Golda Meir to initiate Operation Wrath of God, sending hit squads to track down and kill the group’s organizers and others (later depicted in Steven Spielberg’s Munich).

And though it may have escaped public attention, a secret second directive would go forth as well, which ordered the establishment of a permanent strike force to deter or defeat future attacks.

This mandate would not be realized until two years later, after terrorists sneaked across the border from Lebanon, killed a family of three, and took over an elementary school in Ma’alot with 105 students and 10 teachers inside—hoping to negotiate for the release of their brethren held in Israeli prisons.

Sayeret Matkal raced to the scene and mounted a disastrous rescue attempt. Twenty-one students perished. Addressing the Knesset, Meir exclaimed, “The blood of our children, the martyrs of Ma’alot, cries out to us, exhorting us to intensify our war against terrorism, to perfect our methods.”

Following the attack, counterterrorism responsibilities—especially the delicate art of hostage rescue—shifted from the I.D.F. to a new police unit, initially dubbed the “Fist Brigade” and, later, YAMAM. Chronically underfunded, ostracized by the military, and deemed an unknown quantity by the intelligence services, the unit was a backwater.

That is, until Assaf Hefetz was put in charge. He was a well-regarded I.D.F. paratrooper with important friends, among them future prime minister Ehud Barak. Hefetz had supported the April 1973 operation in which Barak—famously disguised as a woman—infiltrated Beirut and killed several Palestine Liberation Organization leaders as part of Israel’s ongoing retaliation for Munich.

Hefetz professionalized YAMAM, persuading skilled soldiers to join his new police commando unit—whose work was a secret to all but a handful of Israelis.

In May, I visited Hefetz, aged 74, in the seaside hamlet of Caesarea and found a man with the body of a 24-year-old and the hearing of a 104-year-old.

Like many of his generation of Israelis, he speaks his mind without regard for how his words may land. “After 18 months, I had recruited and trained three platoons, and I knew that my unit was much better than the army,” he insisted.

“But I was the only person in the country who thought so.” In due course, he found an eager partner in the spymasters of Shin Bet, who agreed to let YAMAM try its hand at the treacherous work of neutralizing suspected terrorists.

Still, it was Hefetz, personally, who first put YAMAM on the map. On the morning of March 11, 1978, armed guerrillas arrived on Zodiac boats from Lebanon, coming ashore near Haifa.

Once inland, they encountered and murdered an American named Gail Rubin, whose close relative happened to be Abraham Ribicoff, a powerful U.S. senator. Next, they flagged down a taxi, murdered its occupants, then hijacked a bus.

Traveling south along the picturesque coastal highway, they threw hand grenades at passing cars and shot some of the bus passengers. The attack was timed in hopes of disrupting peace talks between Israel’s prime minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian president Anwar Sadat.

The rolling pandemonium came to a halt at a junction north of Tel Aviv. “When I arrived, my unit was [still] an hour away,” Hefetz recalled. The bus had stopped, but it was a charred wreck. “No one knows [exactly] what happened. Call it the fog of war.” Hefetz soon learned that some of the assailants had escaped on foot and were moving toward the beach.

He grabbed his gun and gave chase, eventually killing two of them, capturing a third, and rescuing some of the hostages. In the process, he took a bullet to his right shoulder and lost hearing in one ear.

The incident, known as the Coastal Road Massacre, claimed the lives of more than three dozen people. But Hefetz’s valor raised the question: given what YAMAM’s commander accomplished on his own, what could the unit as a whole do if properly harnessed?

The answer was a decade in coming, during which time YAMAM was bigfooted by Sayeret Matkal during its response to terrorist attacks. In the notorious Bus 300 affair, for example, Sayeret Matkal commandos stormed a bus to rescue hostages and claimed it had killed four terrorists when, in fact, two had survived.

The pair were turned over to Shin Bet operatives, who, a short distance away, murdered them in cold blood. The debacle and its aftermath, which disgraced Shin Bet chief Avraham Shalom—who had ordered the on-site assassinations and then tried to cover it up—left an indelible stain on Israel’s institutions and international credibility.

FOR EVERY TERRORIST ATTACK IN ISRAEL THAT MAKES THE NEWS, THERE ARE 10 THAT ARE PREVENTED.

In 1987, Alik Ron, a man with deep credentials and a devil-may-care attitude, took over YAMAM. He had served in Sayeret Matkal and participated in the legendary 1976 raid on Entebbe, in which an I.D.F. team stormed a Ugandan airport and successfully freed more than 100 hostages. “I was in our most elite units and took part in the most celebrated mission in our history,” said Ron, who in retirement has become a gentleman farmer. “Only when I was put in charge of YAMAM did I realize I was in the company of the most professional unit in Israel.”

And yet when he first addressed his men to say how proud he was to lead them—describing all the great things they would accomplish together—they broke out laughing.

Apparently, the operatives were fed up with being highly trained benchwarmers, always left on the sidelines. Ron persevered nonetheless. And he is withering in his assessment of his old unit (Sayeret Matkal) and its overseers. “Nobody, nobody, not the head of Shin Bet, not Mossad, not the prime minister, can give me an order [to kill terrorists after they have been captured]. He can get me an order, but I will do like this,” he said, lifting his middle finger. “I will not murder them. I will have already killed them in the bus.”

Ron soon got the chance to try things his way. In 1988, he learned that three terrorists had crossed in from Egypt and hijacked a bus full of working mothers on their way to Dimona, the epicenter of Israel’s top-secret nuclear-weapons program.

As Ron raced toward the Negev Desert to link up with his team, he saw CH-53 Sea Stallions on the horizon heading in the same direction. Pounding his fist on his dashboard and unleashing a stream of expletives, Ron recalled, he screamed, “Sayeret Matkal . . . again?!

Ehud Barak was on one of those helicopters, a man who would go on to hold virtually every position in Israeli officialdom—prime minister, defense minister, commander of the armed forces, and head of Sayeret Matkal. Recalling his first encounter with YAMAM 30 years ago, Barak, now 76, expressed astonishment at how Ron and his team had somehow managed to arrive ahead of Sayeret Matkal’s helicopters, raring to go. “We asked them what they brought with them,” Barak recalled. “It ended up they brought everything which was needed for taking over the bus. So we let them do it.”

Israeli-Egyptian border. August 2011. Israeli defense minister Ehud Barak (gesturing) visits the scene of a deadly jihadist incursion.

From the Israeli Defence Ministry/Getty Images.

According to David Tzur, who was a major at the time and would later take over as YAMAM’s commander, the so-called Mothers’ Bus incident was a turning point because it showcased the unit’s speed, judgment, and agility. “We were called to the field at 7:30 in the morning,” he said. “Before we arrived, [the attackers] had killed three hostages.”

At around 10:30, the team’s snipers shot two of the attackers while other YAMAM members stormed the bus and shot the remaining assailant. “No hostages were killed during the operation,” Tzur proudly recalled. Israel’s national-security apparatus—including skeptical I.D.F. generals—took notice and recognized that when it came to counterterrorism they had a scalpel at their disposal instead of blunter instruments. “I don’t believe that anyone has a better unit,” Barak observed. “They are kind of irreplaceable.”

THE ROAD TO SINAI

Lately, YAMAM has gotten used to terror’s new face: extremists intent on inflicting maximum carnage with maximum visibility. “I’ve been in dozens of operations and many times under fire, [facing] many terrorists and suicide bombers,” N admitted. “But the [one] I remember more than all the others is the terror attack on the border in the Sinai Desert.”

It was August 2011, six months after the Arab Spring ouster of Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak—and three years before ISIS formally declared its caliphate. YAMAM, tipped off by Shin Bet that a large-scale attack was imminent somewhere along Israel’s southern border, dispatched one squadron and a sniper team by helicopter. They waited through the night before getting word that shots had been fired at a bus, injuring passengers inside. A family of four, traveling the same highway, was ambushed and slaughtered. “This group of ISIS-Salafi jihadists that came from the Sinai Desert, they were a different challenge for us,” N said of the 12-man death squad. “We know from intelligence that they received training abroad. They were proficient with weapons, grenades, explosive charges, [and even] had handcuffs to kidnap people.” They also brought cameras to film their handiwork.

N, who was a squadron commander at the time, was fired at twice as his YAMAM team arrived on the scene. In the skirmish, one militant detonated a suicide vest, killing himself and a bus driver, and, N recalled, “a terrorist shot a surface-to-air missile at one of our helicopters, but it missed.” Two gunmen were spotted crossing the highway. One was killed in an exchange of fire while a second took aim at a passenger vehicle, killing the driver. By midafternoon the scene seemed to be under control, and Pascal Avrahami—a legendary YAMAM sniper—briefed his superiors, including then defense minister Barak. A short time later, shots rang out from the Egyptian side of the border. Four YAMAM operators scrambled for cover, and in the frenzy a 7.62-mm. round hit Avrahami above the ceramic body armor covering his chest. The sniper, a 49-year-old father of three, had been killed by an enemy sniper, who simply melted back into the desert.

I joined N this past April at Mount Herzl, the final resting place of many of the nation’s fallen warriors. It was Israel’s Remembrance Day, a somber holiday when life and commerce grind to a halt. On this day, N spent time with Avrahami’s parents at their son Pascal’s grave, embracing them and reminiscing about his outsize role in the unit. (The previous evening, as the sun descended, squad members had stood in the courtyard of the YAMAM compound, having refreshments and trading stories. Family members of slain commandos were taken inside a darkened shooting range where their loved ones’ holographic images were projected in midair. The scene was otherworldly but somehow appropriate for this secretive, high-tech cadre.)

On this Remembrance Day, N mourned the loss of his friend, whose 24 years of service made him YAMAM’s longest-serving member. But he stopped at one point to stress that his team is focused less on the past than on the future: “We know the enemy will always try and do something worse, something bigger, something extraordinary that they never did before. And for this scenario we are preparing ourselves.”

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Anti Civil Rights ideas & "Friends" The Horror This great Nation & Its People

The GOA, Your Congressman & Opponents Gun Rights Report card

Just so you know what the Weasels record really is & not what they say! Grumpy

2018 CANDIDATE RATING SCORECARD

Candidates who have established a voting record, either in the office for which they are running or in another elected office, are evaluated primarily based on that voting record. However, sponsorship of pro or antigun legislation and other such factors can affect their grade.
If an incumbent or challenger has not established a voting record or demonstrated his or her position in some other way, that candidate is evaluated on his or her responses to the GOA 2018 Federal Candidate Questionnaire or public statements.
Every candidate, whether an incumbent or challenger, begins with an “A” and is then downgraded for each antigun position or vote.
A+ Pro-Gun Leader: introduces pro-gun legislation.
A – A- Pro-Gun Voter: philosophically sound.
B – B- Pro-Gun Compromiser: generally leans our way.
C – C- Leans Our Way: occasionally.
D – D- Leans Anti-Gun: usually against us.
F Anti-Gun Voter: a philosophically committed anti-gunner.
F- Anti-Gun Leader: outspoken anti-gun advocate who carries anti-gun legislation.
NR Not rated: Refused to answer his or her questionnaire; no track record.
SORT BY: 

Bradley Byrne (R)

B

Robert Kennedy Jr (D)

NR

Martha Roby (R)

B

Tabitha Isner (D)

F

Mike Rogers (R)

B

Mallory Hagan (D)

F

Robert Aderholt (R)

B

Lee Auman (D)

F

Mo Brooks (R)

A

Peter Joffrion (D)

F

Gary Palmer (R)

A-

Danner Kline (D)

F

Terri Sewell (D)

F

Don Young (R)

B

Alyse Galvin (D)

D

Martha McSally (R)

A-

Kyrsten Sinema (D)

F

Wendy Rogers (R)

A

Tom O’Halleran (D)

F

Lea Peterson (R)

NR

Ann Kirkpatrick (D)

D

Nick Pierson (R)

NR

Raúl Grijalva (D)

F-

Paul Gosar (R)

A+

David Brill (D)

NR

Andy Biggs (R)

A

Joan Greene (D)

F

David Schweikert (R)

A-

Anita Malik (D)

D

Ruben Gallego (D)

F-

Debbie Lesko (R)

A

Hiral Tipirneni (D)

D

Steve Ferrara (R)

NR

Greg Stanton (D)

F

Rick Crawford (R)

B

Chintan Desai (D)

F

French Hill (R)

B

Clarke Tucker (D)

F

Steve Womack (R)

B

Joshua Mahony (D)

NR

Bruce Westerman (R)

A-

Hayden Shamel (D)

D

Dianne Feinstein (D)

F-

Kevin de Leon (D)

F-

Doug LaMalfa (R)

A-

Audrey Denney (D)

F

Dale Mensing (R)

NR

Jared Huffman (D)

F-

Charlie Schaupp (R)

NR

John Garamendi (D)

F-

Tim McClintock (R)

A-

Jessica Morse (D)

F

Mike Thompson (D)

F

Doris Matsui (D)

F-

Jrmar Jefferson (D)

NR

Andrew Grant (R)

NR

Ami Bera (D)

F-

Tim Donnelly (R)

A

Paul Cook (R)

B

Marla Livengood (R)

NR

Jerry McNerney (D)

F-

Jeff Denhem (R)

A-

Josh Harder (D)

F

John Fitzgerald (R)

NR

Mark DeSaulnier (D)

F-

Lisa Remmer (R)

NR

Nancy Pelosi (D)

F-

Barbara Lee (D)

F-

Cristina Osmena (R)

D

Jackie Speier (D)

F-

Rudy Peters (R)

NR

Eric Swalwell (D)

F-

Elizabeth Heng (R)

NR

Jim Costa (D)

F

Ron Cohen (R)

NR

Ro Khanna (D)

F-

Christine Russell (R)

NR

Anna Eshoo (D)

F-

Justin Aguilera (R)

A

Zoe Lofgren (D)

F-

Jimmy Pannetta (D)

F-

David Valadao (R)

B

TJ Cox (D)

F

Devin Nunes (R)

B

Andrew Janz (D)

F

Kevin McCarthy (R)

C

Tatiana Matta (D)

NR

Justin Fareed (R)

A

Salud Carbajal (D)

F-

Stephen Knight (R)

B

Katie Hill (D)

F

Antonio Sabato Jr. (R)

A

Julia Brownley (D)

F-

Bryan Witt (D)

F

Judy Chu (D)

F-

Johny Nalbandian (R)

A

Adam Schiff (D)

F-

Benito Bernal (R)

NR

Tony Cardenas (D)

F-

Mark Reed (R)

A

Brad Sherman (D)

F-

Sean Flynn (R)

A

Peter Aguilar (D)

F-

Joshua Scott (R)

NR

Grace Napolitano (D)

F-

Kenneth Wright (R)

NR

Ted Lieu (D)

F-

Jimmy Gomez (D)

F-

Christian Valiente (R)

A

Norma Torres (D)

F-

Kimberlin Pelzer (R)

NR

Raul Ruiz (D)

F-

Ron Bassilian (R)

NR

Karen Bass (D)

F-

Ryan Downing (R)

NR

Linda Sanchez (D)

F-

Young Kim (R)

A

Gil Cisneros (D)

F

Lucille Roybal-Allard (D)

F-

Aja Smith (R)

A

Mark Takano (D)

F-

Ken Calvert (R)

B

Julia Peacock (D)

F

Omar Navarro (R)

B

Maxine Waters (D)

F-

Nanette Barragan (D)

F-

Mimi Walters (R)

B

Katie Porter (D)

F

Russ Lambert (R)

A

Lou Correa (D)

F-

John Briscoe (R)

A

Alan Lowenthal (D)

F-

Dana Rohrabacher (R)

A-

Harley Rouda (D)

F

Diane Harkey (R)

A

Mike Levin (D)

F

Duncan Hunter (R)

B

Ammar Campa-Najjar (D)

D

Juan Hidalgo Jr (R)

NR

Juan Vargas (D)

F-

Omar Qudrat (R)

NR

Scott Peters (D)

F-

Morgan Murtaugh (R)

A

Susan Davis (D)

F-

Casper Stockham (R)

NR

Diana DeGette (D)

F-

Peter Yu (R)

NR

Joe Neguse (D)

F

Scott Tipton (R)

B

Diane Mitsch Bush (D)

F

Ken Buck (R)

A

Karen McCormick (D)

F

Doug Lamborn (R)

B

Stephany Rose Spaulding (D)

F

Mike Coffman (R)

A-

Jason Crow (D)

F

Mark Barrington (R)

NR

Ed Perlmutter (D)

F-

Matthew Corey (R)

A

Chris Murphy (D)

F-

Jennifer Nye (R)

NR

John Larson (D)

F-

John Postemski (R)

NR

Joe Courtney (D)

F-

Dan Reale (L)

A

Angel Cadena (R)

A

Rosa DeLauro (D)

F-

Harry Arora (R)

C

Jim Himes (D)

F-

Manny Santos (R)

A

Jahana Hayes (D)

F

Rob Arlett (R)

A

Tom Carper (D)

F-

Scott Walker (R)

NR

Lisa Blunt Rochester (D)

F

Rick Scott (R)

D

Bill Nelson (D)

F-

Matt Gaetz (R)

A-

Jennifer Zimmerman (D)

F

Neal Dunn (R)

B

Bob Rackleff (D)

F

Ted Yoho (R)

A

Yvonne Hayes Hinson (D)

F

John Rutherford (R)

B

Ges Selmont (D)

F

Virginia Fuller (R)

A

Alfred Lawson (D)

F-

Michael Waltz (R)

A

Nancy Soderberg (D)

F

Mike Miller (R)

A-

Stephanie Murphy (D)

F-

Bill Posey (R)

A

Sanjay Patel (D)

F

Wayne Liebnitzky (R)

B

Darren Soto (D)

F-

Val Demings (D)

F-

Daniel Webster (R)

A

Dana Cottrell (D)

F

Gus Bilirakis (R)

B

Chris Hunter (D)

NR

George Buck (R)

A

Charlie Crist (D)

F-

Kathy Castor (D)

F-

Ross Spano (R)

A

Kristen Carlson (D)

F

Vern Buchanan (R)

B

David Shapiro (D)

F

Greg Steube (R)

A

Brian Mast (R)

D-

Lauren Baer (D)

F

Francis Rooney (R)

B

David Holden (D)

F

Alcee Hastings (D)

F-

Lois Frankel (D)

F-

Nicolas Kimaz (R)

A

Ted Deutch (D)

F-

Joe Kaufman (R)

NR

Debbie Wasserman Shultz (D)

F-

Frederica Wilson (D)

F-

Mario Diaz-Balart (R)

B

Mary Flores (D)

F

Carlos Curbelo (R)

D-

Debbie Mucarsel-Powell (D)

F

Maria Salazar (R)

B

Donna Shalala (D)

F

Buddy Carter (R)

B

Lisa Ring (D)

F

Herman West, Jr. (R)

A

Sanford Biship (D)

D-

Drew Ferguson (R)

B

Chuck Enderlin (D)

F

Joe Profit (R)

A

Hank Johnson (D)

F-

John Lewis (D)

F-

Karen Handel (R)

B

Lucy McBath (D)

F

Rob Woodall (R)

B

Carolyn Bourdeaux (D)

F

Austin Scott (R)

B

Doug Collins (R)

B

Josh McCall (D)

D

Jody Hice (R)

A+

Tabitha Johnson-Green (D)

F

Barry Loudermilk (R)

A-

Flynn Broady Jr (D)

NR

Rick Allen (R)

A-

Francys Johnson (D)

F

David Callahan (R)

C

David Scott (D)

F-

Tom Graves (R)

B

Steve Foster (D)

NR

Ron Curtis (R)

NR

Mazie Hirono (D)

F-

Cam Cavasso (R)

A

Ed Case (D)

F

Brian Evans (R)

F

Tulsi Gabbard (D)

F-

Russ Fulcher (R)

A

Christina McNeil (D)

F

W. Scott Howard (L)

A

Mike Simpson (R)

B

Aaron Swisher (D)

NR

Jimmy Lee Tillman (R)

NR

Bobby Rush (D)

F-

David Merkle (R)

A

Robin Kelly (D)

F-

Art Jones (R)

NR

Daniel Lipinski (D)

F-

Mark Lorch (R)

NR

Jesús “Chuy” Garcia (D)

F

Tom Hanson (R)

NR

Mike Quigley (D)

F-

Peter Roskam (R)

B-

Sean Casten (D)

F

Craig Cameron (R)

NR

Danny Davis (D)

F-

Jitendra Diganvker (R)

NR

Raja Krishnamoorthi (D)

F-

John Elleson (R)

D

Janice Schakowsky (D)

F-

Doug Bennett (R)

NR

Brad Schneider (D)

F-

Nick Stella (R)

NR

Bill Foster (D)

D

Mike Bost (R)

B

Brendan Kelly (D)

NR

Rodney Davis (R)

B

Betsy Dirksen Londrigan (D)

F

Randy Hultgren (R)

B

Lauren Underwood (D)

F

John Shimkus (R)

B

Kevin Gaither (D)

NR

Adam Kinzinger (R)

B

Sara Dady (D)

F

Bill Fawell (R)

NR

Cheri Bustos (D)

F

Darin LaHood (R)

A-

Junius Rodriguez (D)

NR

Mike Braun (R)

A

Joe Donnelly (D)

D

Mark Leyva (R)

A

Pete Visclosky (D)

F-

Jackie Walorski (R)

B

Mel Hall (D)

F

Jim Banks (R)

B

Courtney Tritch (D)

F

Jim Baird (R)

B

Tobi Beck (D)

NR

Susan Brooks (R)

B

Dee Thorton (D)

F

Greg Pence (R)

A

Jeannine Lee Lake (D)

F

Wayne Harmon (R)

NR

André Carson (D)

F-

Larry Bucshon (R)

B

William Tanoos (D)

NR

Trey Hollingsworth (R)

A-

Liz Watson (D)

F

Rod Blum (R)

A

Abby Finkenauer (D)

F

Christopher Peters (R)

A

Dave Loebsack (D)

F-

David Young (R)

B

Cindy Axne (D)

D

Steve King (R)

A+

J.D. Scholten (D)

NR

Roger Marshall (R)

B

Alan LaPolice (D)

D

Steve Watkins (R)

A

Paul Davis (D)

NR

Kevin Yoder (R)

B

Sharice Davids (D)

F

Ron Estes (R)

B

James Thompson (D)

D

James Comer (R)

A-

Paul Walker (D)

NR

Brett Guthrie (R)

B

Hank Linderman (D)

F

Vickie Glisson (R)

NR

John Yarmuth (D)

F-

Thomas Massie (R)

A+

Seth Hall (D)

D

Harold Rogers (R)

B

Kenneth Stepp (D)

NR

Andy Barr (R)

B

Amy McGrath (D)

F

Steve Scalise (R)

B

Jim Francis (D)

NR

Cedric Richmond (D)

F-

Clay Higgins (R)

A-

Mike Johnson (R)

A-

Ralph Abraham (R)

A-

Garret Graves (R)

A-

Eric Brakey (R)

A+

Angus King (I)

D

Zak Ringelstein (D)

F

Mark Holbrook (R)

A

Chellie Pingree (D)

F-

Bruce Poliquin (R)

B

Jared Golden (D)

NR

Tony Campbell (R)

A

Ben Cardin (D)

F-

Andy Harris (R)

A

Jess Colvin (D)

D

Liz Matory (R)

A

Dutch Ruppersberger (D)

F-

Charles Anthony (R)

NR

John Sarbanes (D)

F-

George McDermott (R)

A

Anthony Brown (D)

F-

Bill Devine (R)

NR

Steny Hoyer (D)

F-

Amie Hoeber (R)

C

David Trone (D)

F

Kevin Caldwell (L)

A

Richmond Davis (R)

NR

Elijah Cummings (D)

F-

David Griggs (L)

B

John Walsh (R)

NR

Jamie Raskin (D)

F-

Jasen Wunder (L)

A

Geoff Diehl (R)

A-

Elizabeth Warren (D)

F-

Richard Neal (D)

F-

Tracy Lovvorn (R)

A

Jim McGovern (D)

F-

Rick Green (R)

NR

Lori Trahan (D)

F

Joe Kennedy (D)

F-

John Hugo (R)

NR

Katherine Clark (D)

F-

Joe Schneider (R)

NR

Seth Moulton (D)

F-

Ayanna Pressley (D)

F-

Stephen Lynch (D)

F-

Peter Tedeschi (R)

NR

Bill Keating (D)

F-

John James (R)

A

Debbie Stabenow (D)

F-

Jack Bergman (R)

A-

Matthew Morgan (D)

F

Bill Huizenga (R)

B

Rob Davidson (D)

F

Justin Amash (R)

A+

Cathy Albro (D)

F

John Moolenaar (R)

A

Jerry Hilliard (D)

F

Travis Wines (R)

NR

Dale Kildee (D)

D-

Fred Upton (R)

C

Matt Longjohn (D)

F

Tim Walberg (R)

B

Gretchen Driskell (D)

F

Mike Bishop (R)

B

Elissa Slotkin (D)

F

Candius Stearns (R)

NR

Andy Levin (D)

F

Paul Mitchell (R)

B

Kimberly Bizon (D)

F

Lena Epstien (R)

A

Haley Stevens (D)

F

Jeff Jones (R)

A

Debbie Dingell (D)

F-

Rashida Tlaib (D)

F

Marc Herschfus (R)

NR

Brenda Lawrence (D)

F-

Jimmy Newberger (R)

A

Amy Klobuchar (D)

F-

Karin Housely (R)

NR

Tina Smith (D)

F

Jim Hagedorn (R)

A

Dan Feehan (D)

NR

Jason Lewis (R)

A-

Angie Craig (D)

F

Erik Paulsen (R)

C

Dean Philips (D)

F

Greg Ryan (R)

A

Betty McCollum (D)

F-

Jennifer Zielinski (R)

NR

IIhan Omar (D)

F

Tom Emmer (R)

A-

Ian Todd (D)

D

Dave Hughes (R)

A

Collin Peterson (D)

A

Pete Stauber (R)

NR

Joe Radinovich (D)

F

Roger Wicker (R)

A-

David Baria (D)

F

Chris McDaniel (R)

A

Mike Espy (D)

NR

Cindy Hyde-Smith (R)

NR

Trent Kelly (R)

A-

Randy Wadkins (D)

NR

Bennie Thompson (D)

F

Michael Guest (R)

A

Michael Evans (D)

NR

Steven Palazzo (R)

B

Jeramey Anderson (D)

F

Josh Hawley (R)

B

Claire McCaskill (D)

F-

Robert Vroman (R)

NR

William Lacy Clay (D)

F-

Ann Wagner (R)

B

Cort VanOstran (D)

F

Blaine Luetkemeyer (R)

B

Katy Geppert (D)

F

Vicky Hartzler (R)

B

Renee Hoagenson (D)

NR

Jacob Turk (R)

A

Emanuel Cleaver (D)

F

Sam Graves (R)

B

Henry Martin (D)

F

Billy Long (R)

A-

Jamie Schoolcraft (D)

NR

Jason Smith (R)

A-

Kathy Ellis (D)

NR

Matt Rosendale (R)

A+

Jon Tester (D)

F

Greg Gianforte (R)

A-

Kathleen Williams (D)

F

Deb Fischer (R)

A

Jane Raybould (D)

F

Jeff Fortenberry (R)

C

Jessica McClure (D)

NR

Don Bacon (R)

B

Kara Eastman (D)

F

Adrian Smith (R)

B

Paul Theobald (D)

NR

Dean Heller (R)

B

Jacky Rosen (D)

F-

Joyce Bentley (R)

NR

Dina Titus (D)

F-

Mark Amodei (R)

B

Clint Koble (D)

F

Danny Tarkanian (R)

A

Susie Lee (D)

F

Cresent Hardy (R)

A

Steven Horsford (D)

F

Eddie Edwards (R)

A

Chris Pappas (D)

F

Steve Negron (R)

A

Annie Kuster (D)

F-

Justin O’Donnell (L)

A

Bob Hugin (R)

NR

Bob Menendez (D)

F-

Paul Dilks (R)

A

Donald Norcross (D)

F-

Seth Grossman (R)

A

Jeff Van Drew (D)

NR

John Ordille (L)

A

Tom MacArthur (R)

B

Andrew Kim (D)

F

Chris Smith (R)

D

Josh Welle (D)

F

John McCann (R)

A

Josh Gottheimer (D)

F-

Jim Tosone (L)

B

Rich Pezzullo (R)

A

Frank Pallone (D)

F-

Leonard Lance (R)

D

Tom Mailowski (D)

F

John Muniz (R)

NR

Albio Sires (D)

F-

Eric Fisher (R)

NR

Bill Pascrell (D)

F-

Agha Khan (R)

NR

Donald Payne Jr. (D)

F-

Jay Webber (R)

B

Mikie Sherrill (D)

F

Ryan Martinez (L)

A

Daryl Kipnis (R)

NR

Bonnie Watson-Coleman (D)

F-

Mick Rich (R)

C

Martin Heinrich (D)

F

Gary Johnson (L)

A

Janice Arnold-Jones (R)

A

Debra Haaland (D)

F

Yvette Herrell (R)

A

Xochitl Torres-Small (D)

NR

Steve McFall (R)

NR

Ben Luján (D)

F-

Chele Farley (R)

NR

Kirsten Gillibrand (D)

F-

Lee Zeldin (R)

A-

Perry Gershon (D)

F

Pete King (R)

F

Liuba Grechen Shirley (D)

F

Dan DeBono (R)

B

Thomas Suozzi (D)

F-

Ameer Benno (R)

NR

Kathleen Rice (D)

F-

Gregory Meeks (D)

F-

Grace Meng (D)

F-

Jeff Kurzon (R)

F

Nydia Velázquez (D)

F-

Hakeem Jeffries (D)

F-

Lutchi Gayot (R)

NR

Yvette Clarke (D)

F-

Naomi Levin (R)

NR

Jerrold Nadler (D)

F-

Dan Donovan (R)

F

Max Rose (D)

F

Eliot Rabin (R)

F

Carolyn Maloney (D)

F-

Adriano Espaillat (D)

F

Anthony Pappas (R)

NR

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D)

F

Jason Gonzalez (R)

NR

Jose Serrano (D)

F-

Eliot Engel (D)

F-

Nita Lowey (D)

F-

James O’Donnell (R)

NR

Sean Patrick Maloney (D)

D

John Faso (R)

B

Antonio Delgado (D)

F

Joe Vitollo (R)

A

Paul Tonko (D)

F-

Elise Stefanik (R)

B

Tedra Cobb (D)

F

Claudia Tenney (R)

B

Anthony Brindisi (D)

NR

Tom Reed (R)

A-

Tracy Mitrano (D)

NR

John Katko (R)

B

Dana Balter (D)

F

Jim Maxwell (R)

D

Joe Morelle (D)

F-

Renee Zeno (R)

A

Brian Higgins (D)

F-

Nate McMurray (D)

F

Roger W. Allison (R)

B

G. K. Butterfield (D)

F-

George Holding (R)

B

Linda Coleman (D)

D

Walter B. Jones (R)

A-

Steve (Von) Loor (R)

B

David Price (D)

F-

Virginia Foxx (R)

C

DD Adams (D)

F

Mark Walker (R)

A

Ryan Watts (D)

NR

David Rouzer (R)

A-

Kyle Horton (D)

NR

Richard Hudson (R)

A+

Frank McNeill (D)

NR

Mark Harris (R)

A

Dan McCready (D)

NR

Patrick McHenry (R)

B

David Wilson Brown (D)

NR

Mark Meadows (R)

A

Phillip G. Price (D)

F

Paul Wright (R)

A

Alma Adams (D)

F-

Ted Budd (R)

A-

Kathy Manning (D)

NR

Kevin Cramer (R)

A-

Heidi Heitkamp (D)

D

Kelly Armstrong (R)

A

Mac Scheider (D)

D

Steve Chabot (R)

B

Aftab Pureval (D)

F

Brad Wenstrup (R)

B

Jill Schiller (D)

F

Jim Burgess (R)

NR

Frank Lucas (R)

B

Joyce Beatty (D)

F-

Jim Jordan (R)

A

Janet Garrett (D)

F

Bob Latta (R)

A-

J. Galbraith (D)

F

Bill Johnson (R)

B

Shawna Roberts (D)

D

Bob Gibbs (R)

B

Ken Harbaugh (D)

NR

Warren Davidson (R)

A

Vanessa Enoch (D)

F

Steven Kraus (R)

A

Marcy Kaptur (D)

F-

Mike Turner (R)

B

Theresa Gasper (D)

F

Beverly Goldstein (R)

A

Marcial Fudge (D)

F-

Troy Balderson (R)

A

Danny O’Connor (D)

F

Chris DePizzo (R)

A

Tim Ryan (D)

F-

David Joyce (R)

B

Betsy Rader (D)

F

Steve Stivers (R)

B

Rick Neal (D)

D

Anthony Gonzalez (R)

A

Susan Palmer (D)

F

Kevin Hern (R)

A

Tim Gilpin (D)

NR

Markwayne Mullin (R)

A-

Jason Nichols (D)

D

Frank Lucas (R)

B

Frankie Robbins (D)

NR

Tom Cole (R)

B

Mary Brannon (D)

NR

Steve Russell (R)

A-

Kendra Horn (D)

D

John Verbeek (R)

B

Suzanne Bonamici (D)

F-

Greg Walden (R)

B

Jamie McLeod-Skinner (D)

F

Tom Harrison (R)

NR

Earl Blumenauer (D)

F-

Art Robinson (R)

A

Peter DeFazio (D)

F

Mark Callahan (R)

A

Kurt Schrader (D)

F

Lou Barletta (R)

B

Bob Casey Jr. (D)

F

Brian Fitzpatrick (R)

D

Scott Wallace (D)

F

David Torres (R)

NR

Brendan Boyle (D)

F-

Bryan Leib (R)

F

Dwight Evans (D)

F-

Dan David (R)

B

Madeleine Dean (D)

F

Pearl Kim (R)

C

Mary Gay Scanlon (D)

F

Greg McCauley (R)

C

Chrissy Houlahan (D)

F

Marty Nothstein (R)

A

Susan Wild (D)

F

John Chrin (R)

A

Matt Cartwright (D)

F-

Dan Meuser (R)

A

Denny Wolff (D)

NR

Scott Perry (R)

A

George Scott (D)

F

Lloyd Smucker (R)

A-

Jess King (D)

F

Tom Marino (R)

B

Marc Friedenberg (D)

F

John Joyce (R)

A

Brent Ottaway (D)

D

Guy Reschenthaler (R)

A

Bibiana Boerio (D)

NR

Glenn Thompson (R)

B

Susan Boser (D)

NR

Mike Kelly (R)

A-

Ron Dinicola (D)

D

Ebert G “Bill” Beeman (L)

A

Keith Rothfus (R)

A-

Conor Lamb (D)

NR

Mike Doyle (D)

F-

Bob Flanders (R)

D

Sheldon Whitehouse (D)

F-

Patrick Donovan (R)

NR

David Cicilline (D)

F-

Sal Caiozzo (R)

A

Jim Langevin (D)

F-

Katie Arrington (R)

A

Joe Cunningham (D)

F

Joe Wilson (R)

B

Sean Carrigan (D)

D

Jeff Duncan (R)

A+

Mary Geren (D)

F

William Timons (R)

A

Brandon Brown (D)

D

Ralph Norman (R)

A

Archie Parnell (D)

D

Gerhard Gressman (R)

NR

James Clyburn (D)

F-

Tom Rice (R)

A-

Robert Williams (D)

F

Dusty Johnson (R)

NR

Tim Bjorkman (D)

F

Marsha Blackburn (R)

A-

Phil Bredesen (D)

F

Phil Roe (R)

A

Martin Olsen (D)

NR

Tim Burchett (R)

A

Renee Hoyos (D)

F

Charles Fleischmann (R)

B

Danielle Mitchell (D)

NR

Scott Desjarlais (R)

A-

Mariah Phillips (D)

F

Jody Ball (R)

A

Jim Cooper (D)

F-

John Rose (R)

A

Dawn Barlow (D)

D

Mark Green (R)

A

Justin Kanew (D)

F

David Kustoff (R)

B

Erika Pearson (D)

NR

Charlotte Bergmann (R)

A

Steve Cohen (D)

F-

Ted Cruz (R)

A+

Beto O’Rourke (D)

F-

Louie Gohmert (R)

A

Shirley J. McKellar (D)

F

Dan Crenshaw (R)

A

Todd Litton (D)

D

Van Taylor (R)

A

Lorie Burch (D)

F

John Ratcliffe (R)

A-

Catherine Krantz (D)

F

Lance Gooden (R)

A

Dan Wood (D)

NR

Ron Wright (R)

A

Jana Sanchez (D)

D

John Culberson (R)

C

Lizzie Fletcher (D)

F

Kevin Brady (R)

B

Steven David (D)

D

Al Green (D)

F-

Michael McCaul (R)

Mike Siegel (D)

F

Mike Conaway (R)

B

Jennie Lou Leeder (D)

F

Kay Granger (R)

B

Vanessa Adia (D)

F

Mac Thornberry (R)

B

Greg Sagan (D)

F

Randy Weber (R)

A

Adrienne Bell (D)

F

Tim Westley (R)

NR

Vicente Gonzalez (D)

NR

Rick Seeberger (R)

A

Veronica Escobar (D)

F

Bill Flores (R)

B

Rick Kennedy (D)

NR

Ava Pate (R)

NR

Sheila Jackson Lee (D)

F-

Jodey Arrington (R)

B

Miguel Levario (D)

F

Joaquin Castro (D)

F-

Chip Roy (R)

A

Joseph Kopser (D)

F

Pete Olson (R)

B

Sri Kulkarni (D)

F

Will Hurd (R)

C

Gina Jones (D)

F

Kenny E. Marchant (R)

B

Jan McDowell (D)

F

Roger Williams (R)

A-

Julie Oliver (D)

F

Michael C. Burgess (R)

B

Linsey Fagan (D)

F

Michael Cloud (R)

A

Eric Holguin (D)

F

Henry Cuellar (D)

C-

Phillip Aronoff (R)

NR

Sylvia Garcia (D)

F

Eddie Bernice Johnson (D)

F-

John Carter (R)

B

Mary Hegar (D)

D

Pete Sessions (R)

B

Colin Allred (D)

F

Willie Billups (R)

A

Marc Veasey (D)

F

Rey Gonzalez (R)

A

Filemon Vela (D)

C

David Smalling (R)

NR

Lloyd Doggett (D)

F-

Brian Babin (R)

A-

Dayna Steele (D)

F

Mitt Romney (R)

D

Jenny Wilson (D)

F

Rob Bishop (R)

A-

Lee Castillo (D)

F

Chris Stewart (R)

A-

Shireen Ghorbani (D)

NR

John Curtis (R)

A-

James Singer (D)

F

Mia Love (R)

A-

Ben McAdams (D)

D

Lawrence Zupan (R)

NR

Bernie Sanders (I)

F-

Anya Tinio (R)

A

Peter Welch (D)

F-

Corey Stewart (R)

A

Tim Kaine (D)

F-

Matt Waters (L)

A

Rob Wittman (R)

B

Vangie Williams (D)

F

Scott Taylor (R)

B

Elaine Luria (D)

F

Bobby Scott (D)

F-

Ryan McAdams (R)

A

Donald McEachin (D)

F-

Denver Riggleman (R)

A

Lesie Cockburn (D)

F

Ben Cline (R)

A

Jennifer Lewis (D)

F

Dave Brat (R)

A-

Abigail Spanberger (D)

F

Thomas Oh (R)

C

Don Beyer (D)

F-

Morgan Griffith (R)

B

Anthony Flaccavento (D)

F

Barbara Comstock (R)

B

Jennifer Wexton (D)

F

Jeff Dove (R)

A

Gerry Connolly (D)

F-

Stevan Porter (L)

A

Susan Hutchison (R)

NR

Maria Cantwell (D)

F-

Jeffrey Beeler (R)

NR

Suzan DelBene (D)

F-

Rick Larsen (D)

F-

Jaime Herrera Beutler (R)

B

Carolyn Long (D)

F

Dan Newhouse (R)

A-

Christine Brown (D)

F

Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R)

C

Lisa Brown (D)

F

Douglas Dightman (R)

A-

Derek Kilmer (D)

F-

Craig Keller (R)

NR

Pramila Jayapal (D)

F-

Dino Rossi (R)

B

Kim Schrier (D)

F

Adam Smith (D)

F-

Sarah Smith (D)

F

Joseph Brumbles (R)

A

Denny Heck (D)

F-

Patrick Morrisey (R)

A

Joe Manchin (D)

F-

David McKinley (R)

B

Kendra Fershee (D)

F

Alex Mooney (R)

A

Talley Sergent (D)

D

Carol Miller (R)

A

Richard Ojeda (D)

NR

Leah Vukmir (R)

A

Tammy Baldwin (D)

F

Bryan Steil (R)

A

Randy Bryce (D)

F

Mark Pocan (D)

F-

Steve Toft (R)

A

Ron Kind (D)

F

Tim Rogers (R)

NR

Gwen Moore (D)

F-

Jim Sensenbrenner (R)

B-

Tom Palzewic (D)

F

Glenn Grothman (R)

A-

Dan Kohl (D)

NR

Sean Duffy (R)

B

Margaret Engebretson (D

F

Mike Gallagher (R)

B

Beau Liegeois (D)

NR

John Barrasso (R)

A

Gary Trauner (D)

F

Liz Cheney (R)

B

Greg Hunter (D)

NR