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All About Guns Ammo Darwin would of approved of this!

Some serious 22 hornet scope cam killing – There is animals being blown away here kiddies!


Folks you would not believe how much damage these critters do to our food supply. Or how many of these invasive critters there out there. Since they have almost no predators stalking them except for us! Grumpy

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All About Guns Ammo

A Pre WWII Winchester Model 70 in Caliber 220 Swift

 WINCHESTER PR 64 MODEL - 70 TARGET BOLT ACTION RIFLE CALIBER 22O SWIFT & SCOPE MFG 1961 - Picture 1
WINCHESTER PR 64 MODEL - 70 TARGET BOLT ACTION RIFLE CALIBER 22O SWIFT & SCOPE MFG 1961 - Picture 2
WINCHESTER PR 64 MODEL - 70 TARGET BOLT ACTION RIFLE CALIBER 22O SWIFT & SCOPE MFG 1961 - Picture 3
WINCHESTER PR 64 MODEL - 70 TARGET BOLT ACTION RIFLE CALIBER 22O SWIFT & SCOPE MFG 1961 - Picture 4
WINCHESTER PR 64 MODEL - 70 TARGET BOLT ACTION RIFLE CALIBER 22O SWIFT & SCOPE MFG 1961 - Picture 5
WINCHESTER PR 64 MODEL - 70 TARGET BOLT ACTION RIFLE CALIBER 22O SWIFT & SCOPE MFG 1961 - Picture 6
WINCHESTER PR 64 MODEL - 70 TARGET BOLT ACTION RIFLE CALIBER 22O SWIFT & SCOPE MFG 1961 - Picture 7
WINCHESTER PR 64 MODEL - 70 TARGET BOLT ACTION RIFLE CALIBER 22O SWIFT & SCOPE MFG 1961 - Picture 8
WINCHESTER PR 64 MODEL - 70 TARGET BOLT ACTION RIFLE CALIBER 22O SWIFT & SCOPE MFG 1961 - Picture 9
WINCHESTER PR 64 MODEL - 70 TARGET BOLT ACTION RIFLE CALIBER 22O SWIFT & SCOPE MFG 1961 - Picture 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Okay let us just begin by saying that this rifle was never meant for a Peasant like me.
Especially since it is pretty obvious that this shooting rig was made up for some serious long range target shooting. For example, the scope set up was top of the line 1930’s technology. (I would bet that the scope & rings cost almost as much as the rifle too)
Also unless you went whole hog and sent off to England. To certain folks with names like Holland & Holland or Rigby. Then you went with a Winchester. Which is meant as no slight to them.
The last thing that I would like to mention. Is the choice of 220 Swift as the caliber of this rig. Since it was the fastest round out there.
Although at the price of quickly burning out your barrel. which was due to the poor quality of rifle barrel steel of the time.
But the good news about that. Is that now a days with the vastly improved steel used in barrel making. The barrel life of most barrels shooting the fast 7 hot 220 swift is around now a thousand or so rounds. before the barrels start to decline in accuracy.
*By the way, I have one in a sporterized 1903 Springfield. That shoots like a dream and is not fussy at all. When it comes to its diet of 220 Swift ammo. It just keeps plugging away at the x ring area.

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Ammo Born again Cynic!

Take it for what its worth! – Herter's International Ammunition – Buyer Beware


Being an very skeptical, cynical type. I would like to say these “few” words about this one!

  1. I have never used this brand of ammo before!
  2. I have heard both that it was made by Tula from Russia & it was made by Sellier & Bellot. Of which brand I have used and am a big fan of by the way!
  3. I do not know this fellow on the screen above
  4. I do not know how good a shape that rifle was in.
  5. Or how well it was maintained / taken care of.
  6. But I do firmly believe that Sh*t does happen to everyone at least a couple of times in ones life.

So take this with a grain of salt and make your own conclusions! Good Luck Grumpy

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All About Guns Ammo

The AML5.56™ Automatic Magazine Loader

Automatic Magazine Loader AML-5.56 – YouTube


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeCkWK-k9mQ
Jan 22, 2017 – Uploaded by Amir Fischbein

The AML5.56™ Automatic Magazine Loader is a military-quality universal magazine loader system, designed …

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All About Guns Ammo

The 45/70 Sharps – The Gelatine tests

I still say that the 45/70 is one hell of a close up dangerous game round. For either the 2 or the 4 legged type of critters out there. Otherwise it would still not be used by a lot of pretty smart & tough folks out there!

 

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All About Guns Ammo

Rex’s TOP 7 Rifle Cartridges! ~ Rex Reviews


Uh, excuse me! But it seems that the 243 Winchester is AWOL from your Video. Now I do not know about you.
But I think that the 243 is right up there with sliced bread. And the brilliant & brave person who first thought up the Blow Job!
Grumpy (Now you know why I am called this Kiddies)

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All About Guns Ammo

Cartridge Hall of Fame – 38-55 Winchester (I'm seriously thinking of buying a rifle in that caliber)

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Ammo

The Definitive list: What your carry ammo says about you…

 By 

 
OK… Here it is… the long awaited, definitive list of what your carry ammo says about you. Once again, try not to get too butt-hurt. Enjoy!
Concealed Carry Ammo
*********************************************************************
Hornady TAP – “I work for mall security.”
Remington Golden Saber – “I dont always drink beer, but when I do I prefer Dos Equis.”
Fiocchi – “I carry a Kel-Tec.”
Glaser Safety Slug – “I carry a Glock 7. Its made in Germany. It doesn’t show up on airport X-ray machines and it costs more than what you make in a month!”
Federal Premium Hydra Shock – “I used to be a cop.”
Winchester Black Talons – “I DON”T GIVE A F*CK!”
Corbon DPX – I have A.D.D. and am easily distracted by shiny… SQUIRREL!
Sellier & Bellot – “I am a member at more than three gun forums, and I buy all of my ammo online.”
Hornady Critical Defense – “I drive a mini van and shop at IKEA.”
Hornady Critical Duty – “I drive a mini van and shop at IKEA, but I also belong to at least one gun forum.”
Hornady Critical Defense Lite – “I am a girl and I only go shooting once every two years.”
Hornady Zombie Max – “I unlocked every gun and upgrade possible in Call of Duty during the first weekend that I had the game.”
Winchester PDX1 – “Hey, buddy, 2003 called and it wants its ammo back.”
Remington UMC – “I am a 75 year old grandma and I think that Walmart is the only place that sells ammo.”
Hornady Custom – “I am a deer hunter and I have perfect shot placement… even in a gun fight.”
Magtech – “This is my first gun.”
PMC – “This is my first gun and it’s a Hi-Point.”
Ten-X – “My EDC is my cowboy action shooting setup.”
Winchester Ranger – “I have been reading the same gun-rags over and over again for years.”
Black Hills – “I’m a hipster who also owns a gun.”
Doubletap – “I too am a hipster who also owns a gun.”
Buffalo Bore – “I live in Montana.”
Federal Guard Dog – “I f*cking hate living in New Jersey.”
Speer Gold Dot – “Lets Go Yankees!
Aguila – “I am a member at every gun forum. Yeah. Every damn one of them.”
Roll your own – “Am I being detained?”
FMJ – “I carry a .22″
*****************************************************************
Did I miss any?

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All About Guns Ammo

The .32-40 WCF, Darling of the Schuetzen Game By Dave Thornblom

Image result for 32-40 ballard223remmington 32-40ballard 270winchester.jpg

.32-40 cartridge between .223 Remington (left) and .270 Winchester (right)

 
The .32-40 WCF began life in 1884 as a new chambering for single shot rifles. The .32-40 was actually a Ballard development; the WCF tag came later.
Then Marlin jumped on the bandwagon, probably when they started manufacturing the Ballard rifle. Marlin also chambered some of their lever action rifles for the .32-40, as did Winchester.
When Ballard originally developed the .32-40 it was supposed to be a combination hunting and target cartridge.
It was used primarily as a target round because the original loading (165 grain lead bullet between 1400 and 1500 fps) left much to be desired as a hunting round when compared to the .38-55 and the .45-70.
When Marlin and Winchester started producing the lever rifles for the .32-40, and smokeless powder came in vogue, a new High Velocity hunting load with a 165 grain jacketed soft point bullet at between 1800 and 1900 fps was introduced.Image result for The .32-40 WCF
This brought the .32-40 to within 200 to 300 fps of the early .32 Winchester Special loading. By today’s standards, even this High Velocity load is out dated, but it will still do for small to medium size deer out to 100 yards.
What the .32-40 lacks in velocity and energy it more than makes up for in accuracy. Many bench rest and Schuetzen records have been set with the .32-40.
This has been accomplished using both black and smokeless powder, and combinations thereof behind cast bullets, breach seated, or fixed ammunition.
In its heyday, some of the finest single shot target rifles of that era were chambered for the .32-40. There was also a popular wildcat target cartridge based on the .32-40 case, known as the .33-40. It is said that in a good rifle the .32-40 can hold its own with modern day match cartridges out to 300 yards.
There must be something to this because there has been a resurgence of the Schuetzen game, and single shot rifle manufacturers like C. Sharps, Shiloh Sharps, Meacham High Wall, Ballard, Lone Star Rolling Block and CPA Stevens are all producing rifles chambered for the .32-40. History repeats itself as once again this little cartridge, the darling of the Schuetzen game, is producing tiny 100 and 200 yard 10-shot groups.
Sure, it may be a little wind sensitive, but the Schuetzen boys are using heavy cast spitzer bullets to good effect, and are experts at doping the wind.
No one can dispute the ability of the old master, Mr. Harry Pope, who built some of the finest match rifles of his era and was also a top notch competitor.Image result for Mr. Harry Pope
I am told that some of his records still stand. The .32-40 was his favorite match cartridge, and he could have chambered his personal rifle for any cartridge he wished.
Lever action rifles chambered for the .32-40 were the Marlin models 1881 and 1893, and the Winchester model 1894. First year production Winchester 1894’s were offered only in .32-40 and .38-55.
The lever action rifles chambered for the .32-40 all seem to have rifling twist rates of 1 turn in 16″ as do the single shot target rifles.
In recent years, the Schuetzen boys are using heavier bullets than the standard 165 grains. The newer target single shots are using a 1 turn in 14″ twist to stabilize the longer spitzer bullets.Image result for The .32-40 WCF
For top accuracy in the new Schuetzen rifles, spitzer shaped 196 to 204 grain cast bullets, tapered especially for breach seating, are used with 13 to 14 grains of H4227 and Federal 150 LP primers. Midway U.S.A. sells newly manufactured Winchester .32-40 cases.
All die manufacturers still offer .32-40 dies, so the cartridge is not as dead as some writers would have us believe. With rifles, loading dies, cases and bullet moulds readily available, the .32-40 refuses to die, purely on the grounds of nostalgia and superb accuracy.
 

Winchester - 1894 *produced in 1899* - Picture 2
Winchester - 1894 *produced in 1899* - Picture 3
Winchester - 1894 *produced in 1899* - Picture 4
Winchester - 1894 *produced in 1899* - Picture 5
Winchester - 1894 *produced in 1899* - Picture 6
Winchester - 1894 *produced in 1899* - Picture 7
Winchester - 1894 *produced in 1899* - Picture 8
Winchester - 1894 *produced in 1899* - Picture 9
Winchester - 1894 *produced in 1899* - Picture 10

https://youtu.be/Jl1RwbWNEAo

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All About Guns Allies Ammo

Some useful Information from the NRA to California Deer Hunters / Bambi Busters

Reminder for California Hunters: Phase 2 of Non-Lead Ammunition Requirements Currently in Effect

With deer season underway in some parts of the state and fast-approaching in others, and upland game bird season just around the corner, including dove-opener this weekend, it is important for hunters to be mindful of California’s non-lead ammunition hunting requirements imposed by AB 711 (2013) which NRA opposed. NRA has previously alertedhunters about the first and second phase of AB 711, which drastically expanded California’s restrictions on hunters using lead ammunition from previous years. These restrictions remain in effect this season.
Given the drastic changes caused by AB 711, its provisions were decided to be phased in over time, up until July 1, 2019, when they will be expanded to apply to the taking of any wildlife with a firearm in California. The first phase, which has been in effect since July 1, 2015, requires all California hunters to use certified “non-lead ammunition” when taking: (1) Nelson bighorn sheep anywhere within the state; and (2) any wildlife within a state Wildlife Area or an Ecological Reserve.
Additionally, as of July 1, 2016, AB 711’s second phase has taken effect. It requires hunters to use certified non-lead shot when taking any upland game birds anywhere in the state, except for dove, quail, snipe, or any game birds taken under the authority of a licensed game bird club. In other words, it requires use of non-lead shot statewide for taking turkey, chukar, and pheasant that are not hunted on the grounds of a properly licensed club. This second phase restriction also applies to game birds taken with a shotgun under a depredation permit.
Dove hunters should be aware that various prominent locations for dove hunting are inside Wildlife Areas and Ecological Reserves where non-lead shot will be required. For example, the Imperial Wildlife area includes the Wister Unit, Hazzard Unit, and the Finney-Ramer Unit—some of California’s most popular dove hunting locations. The Camp Cady Wildlife Area near Barstow and the Ash Creek Wildlife Area in Lassen County are also very popular. For a map of California’s existing Ecological Reserves and Wildlife Areas, visit https://map.dfg.ca.gov/lands/. And for more detailed information about specific Ecological Reserves and Wildlife Areas, visit: https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Lands/Places-to-Visit.
While those hunting dove, quail, snipe, or any game birds taken under the authority of a licensed game bird club need not worry about the “Condor Zone” and instead only Wildlife Areas and Ecological Reserves, deer hunters must worry about both. Deer hunters should be aware that the California Condor Range includes portions of zone A, as well as all of zones D7, D8, D9, D10, D11, and D13. Hunting deer in any of these areas will require the use of non-lead ammunition.
For your convenience, NRA and CRPA have put together a quick reference guide to determine whether a particular hunt will require using non-lead ammunition.

 
For a full-size downloadable version of this map, visit https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=122314&inline
 
We strongly encourage all hunters to contact the California Department of Fish and Wildlife before going out to the field to determine whether the area you plan on hunting requires use of non-lead projectiles. For more information, contact the Department’s Wildlife Branch – Game Management at:
1812 9th Street, Sacramento, CA 95811
Phone: (916) 445-0411
Additionally, you can also call or visit any one of the Department’s Field and Regional Offices, a list of which is available online at https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Explore/Organization/LRB.
 
 
Hunter’s Guide to Understanding and Complying with
California’s Lead Ammunition Ban Now Available on NRA’s Website
 
NRA and CRPA have been at the forefront of the fight to protect traditional ammunition in California for years and achieved important successes prior to the passes of AB 711. Despite this setback, NRA and CRPA are not giving up on protecting their members who hunt in California from the lead ammunition ban. They will continue to monitor its implementation and enforcement to make sure hunters are treated fairly and according to the law.
To that end, NRA and CRPA have now published the Guide to Understanding and Complying with California’s Lead Ammunition Restrictions, which can also be found on the California Stand and Fight web page.  This helpful and important guide serves as a comprehensive resource for hunters who need to know about California’s lead ammunition restrictions. The guide will aid hunters in navigating California’s complex lead ammunition regulations, especially when using traditional lead ammunition for hunting while doing so remains legal in certain areas for a limited time.
As explained above, the new law will require the use of non-lead ammunition for all hunting statewide beginning July 1, 2019. In the years leading up to the total statewide ban, lead ammunition used for hunting will be incrementally restricted in phases. The guide explains each of the three phases in detail and will help hunters comply with these patchwork restrictions as they take effect.