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Leadership of the highest kind The Green Machine This great Nation & Its People War

Lord knows we could really use some men like him today!

Strategy General George S. Patton Photograph by Retro Images Archive

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A Victory! All About Guns The Green Machine This great Nation & Its People

38 years ago we conquered The Island of Grenada – Which helped in The Final Defeat of the Soviet Union as 6 years later the Berlin Wall fell

I snagged this off American Rifleman.

The invasion of Grenada had just begun, and the U.S. assault troops were in trouble. American transport aircraft dropped a company of U.S. 75th Rangers onto the runway at Port Salines Airport, and the American troops were quickly engaged by 23 mm anti-aircraft guns. With the men scattered along the length of the runway and struggling to shed their parachutes, two Soviet-made BTR-60 armored personnel carriers appeared at the end of the runway and began to close on the Americans. The BTRs’ heavy machine guns began to chatter, and soon, 14.5 mm rounds were splattering off the tarmac among the American troops.

Urgent Fury was a multi-national operation. Men of the Eastern Caribbean Defense Force help secure the island. The soldier in the foreground carries the FN FAL rifle (7.62 NATO) while the man to left holds a Sterling submachine gun (9 mm).

Urgent Fury was a multi-national operation. Men of the Eastern Caribbean Defense Force help secure the island. The soldier in the foreground carries the FN FAL rifle (7.62 NATO) while the man to left holds a Sterling submachine gun (9 mm).
A particularly large amount of communist small arms were found on Grenada. The crate is filled with M44 carbines (7.62x54 mm R). The rifle in the middle is the relatively rare Czech vz.52/57 rifle (7.62x39 mm). On the left is the ubiquitous AK-47.

A particularly large amount of communist small arms were found on Grenada. The crate is filled with M44 carbines (7.62×54 mm R). The rifle in the middle is the relatively rare Czech vz.52/57 rifle (7.62×39 mm). On the left is the ubiquitous AK-47.
The vz.52/57 was a surprise find for U.S. troops on Grenada. These rifles had been phased out of Czech service in 1957, and many found their way to Cuba, who then passed them on to nations like Angola and Grenada. The vz.52/57 has an integral blade bayonet in a recess cut into the right side of the stock.

The vz.52/57 was a surprise find for U.S. troops on Grenada. These rifles had been phased out of Czech service in 1957, and many found their way to Cuba, who then passed them on to nations like Angola and Grenada. The vz.52/57 has an integral blade bayonet in a recess cut into the right side of the stock.

Maj. David T. Rivard noted the difficult initial moments of the Grenada operation in his report “An Analysis of Operation Urgent Fury” to the Air Command and Staff College:

“The anti-aircraft guns had been positioned on hills near the airport and could not depress their guns low enough to effectively fire on the C-130s. As the 700 Rangers drifted toward the airstrip in their chutes, the Cubans met them with AK-47 fire. Armored personnel carriers appeared within 400 yds. of the landing zone and started to engage the Rangers. The troops took cover, and the AC-130 gunship overhead provided effective covering fire. The enemy forces had been waiting for the attack.”

Czech Samopal Sa 25 (vz. 48b) submachine guns (9 mm) captured in Grenada. The wooden-stocked Sa 23 is seen at the right.

Czech Samopal Sa 25 (vz. 48b) submachine guns (9 mm) captured in Grenada. The wooden-stocked Sa 23 is seen at the right.
An UZI captured among the communist AK-47s.

An UZI captured among the communist AK-47s.
Soviet-made PKM (7.62x54 mm R) general-purpose machine guns captured on Grenada.  These gas-operated MGs fire from an open bolt with a cyclic rate of 650 rounds-per-minute.

Soviet-made PKM (7.62×54 mm R) general-purpose machine guns captured on Grenada. These gas-operated MGs fire from an open bolt with a cyclic rate of 650 rounds-per-minute.

As the BTR-60s quickly closed the range, it appeared that the Rangers’ drop zone would be overrun.  When the vehicles reached the mid-point of the runway, both BTRs were suddenly struck with hollow-charge antitank rounds. The fast-acting Rangers had set up 90 mm recoilless rifles and immediately scored hits. This was just in time, as the sky above was filled with the descending parachutes of the next wave of Rangers. The second group of Rangers quickly assaulted the 23 mm AA guns positions atop a nearby hill.  Within 10 minutes, the AA guns were silent, too.

At War in America’s Backyard

The invasion of Grenada began on the morning of Oct. 25, 1983.  Operation “Urgent Fury” quickly became fast and furious, as America’s Rapid Deployment Force, including elements of the 82nd Airborne Division, Marine Corps, U.S. Army Delta Force, and Navy SEALs, moved to secure the island from Grenadian and Cuban communist forces.

A PKM machine gun posed alongside a broad range of long arms captured on Grenada, including an SMLE Mk III, a Martini-Henry rifle, a commercial shotgun and a Czech vz. 52/57.

A PKM machine gun posed alongside a broad range of long arms captured on Grenada, including an SMLE Mk III, a Martini-Henry rifle, a commercial shotgun and a Czech vz. 52/57.
Many more eastern-bloc small arms were captured on Grenada than there were men to use them—leading U.S. intel experts to believe that the Cubans and Soviets were planning a strong push to extend their influence into Latin America.

Many more eastern-bloc small arms were captured on Grenada than there were men to use them—leading U.S. intel experts to believe that the Cubans and Soviets were planning a strong push to extend their influence into Latin America.
A PKM machine gun captured, along with a M1 carbine.

A PKM machine gun captured, along with a M1 carbine.

President Reagan directed U.S. forces to Grenada specifically to guarantee the safety of 600 American medical students on the island. The action in Grenada came just two days after the deadly terrorist attack on the USMC barracks in Beirut, Lebanon, where a suicide truck bomb killed 220 U.S. Marines. The Cold War turned hot in the sunny Caribbean, only 1,500 miles southwest of Miami, Fla.

Communist Defenses

Communist forces on Grenada were well-equipped with anti-aircraft guns, particularly the Czech-made M53 quadruple 12.7 mm gun. These guns were particularly dangerous to the helicopters that supported the landing force. While Operation Urgent Fury may not rival the Marine landings of previous wars, there was no shortage of leatherneck heroism on Grenada.  The USMC profile “U.S. Marines in Grenada 1983” describes the dangers presented by enemy AA on the island and traditional Marine courage in response:

“Marine Capt. Jeb F. Seagle dragged Captain Timothy D. Howard away from their burning AH-1 Cobra, shot down by Grenadian 12.7 mm antiaircraft fire near Fort Frederick. Capt. Seagle was killed while looking for help for Howard, who had been severely wounded. Howard was ultimately rescued by a CH-46, piloted by Maj. DeMars and 1st Lt. Lawrence M. King, Jr.

A U.S. Ranger poses with a haul of AK-47s and a Czech vz. 52/57 light machine gun (7.62x39 mm).  The vz. 52/57 used either metallic link belts or 25-round box magazines interchangeably.  Its cyclic rate was 1,100 rounds-per-minute.

A U.S. Ranger poses with a haul of AK-47s and a Czech vz. 52/57 light machine gun (7.62×39 mm). The vz. 52/57 used either metallic link belts or 25-round box magazines interchangeably. Its cyclic rate was 1,100 rounds-per-minute.
A haul of carbines: M44 types, vz 52/57, and the U.S. M1 carbine.

A haul of carbines: M44 types, vz 52/57, and the U.S. M1 carbine.
A mixed crate of vz. 52/57 rifles and M44 carbines.

A mixed crate of vz. 52/57 rifles and M44 carbines.

While another Marine Cobra attacked the antiaircraft site with 20 mm cannon and rockets, Maj. DeMars landed his CH-46 in the field near Howard. The landing chopper attracted small-arms fire to the field. A few rounds hit the CH-46, slightly damaging the stabilizing equipment. The squadron maintenance chief, Gunnery Sgt. Kelly M. Neidigh (a Vietnam veteran) riding along as a gunner, quickly disconnected himself from his intercom equipment and jumped from the aircraft.

Armed with an M-16 rifle, he sprinted the 40-yd. distance to Capt. Howard. Ignoring the fire directed at him, Neidigh half-dragged, half-carried Howard back to the aircraft and hoisted him on board with the aid of the crew chief. Cpl. Simon D. Gore, Jr. Still under fire, DeMars continued to wait in hopes of finding Capt. Seagle, not knowing that hostile fire had already killed him.

A soldier of the Eastern Caribbean Defense Force poses with a captured RPG-2 rocket launcher and a Bren L4 light machine gun (7.62 NATO).

A soldier of the Eastern Caribbean Defense Force poses with a captured RPG-2 rocket launcher and a Bren L4 light machine gun (7.62 NATO).
Bren L4 light machine guns captured on Grenada.

Bren L4 light machine guns captured on Grenada.
Cold War trophies: U.S. Rangers enjoy their haul of AK-47 assault rifles. Note the Czech vz. 52/57 LMG to the far right.

Cold War trophies: U.S. Rangers enjoy their haul of AK-47 assault rifles. Note the Czech vz. 52/57 LMG to the far right.

Finally, with no sign of the second Cobra pilot, and with Howard’s condition rapidly worsening, DeMars decided to take off. The second Marine Cobra was hit by AA fire and crashed into the harbor with the loss of the pilot and copilot. The CH-46 flew Captain Howard to the USS Guam, where he received medical treatment that saved his life but could not save his right forearm.”

An Island Base for Communist Expansion

The island of Grenada was filled with arms caches, with the communists storing far more firearms than there were Cubans or Grenadians available to use them.  The Marine history of Urgent Fury describes the efforts made to secure the stockpiles:

“Local citizens immediately began to point out members of the militia and the People’s Revolutionary Army to the Marines, leading them to houses and other sites of concealed arms caches. Grenadians even loaned their vehicles to the Marines for use in gathering the considerable quantities of arms and ammunition that were being uncovered. Patrols, accompanied by local guides, moved into the countryside to search out caches; Marines established roadblocks to stop and identify members of the Grenadian army and militia who were trying to escape detection by changing into civilian clothing.”

Multiple styles of AK-47 rifles captured on Grenada. An extra barrel for a Czech vz. 52/57 LMG is seen on top of the pile.

Multiple styles of AK-47 rifles captured on Grenada. An extra barrel for a Czech vz. 52/57 LMG is seen on top of the pile.
AA defense: several examples of the Czech-made M53 (12.7 mm) AA gun were captured on Grenada. This gun was used in the defense of Point Salines airport.

AA defense: several examples of the Czech-made M53 (12.7 mm) AA gun were captured on Grenada. This gun was used in the defense of Point Salines airport.
Liberated: American students at St. Georges University on Grenada pose with a trooper of the 82nd Airborne Division. He carries an M16A1 rifle equipped with an M7 bayonet.

Liberated: American students at St. Georges University on Grenada pose with a trooper of the 82nd Airborne Division. He carries an M16A1 rifle equipped with an M7 bayonet.

Later, as the Marines took the Grenadian fort at St. Georges:

“Large quantities of weapons, including light machine guns, AK-47 assault rifles, heavy machine guns and great stacks of ammunition were left behind in Fort Frederick. Nearby, Marines discovered a truck with three new 82 mm mortars and two trucks heavily loaded with anti-aircraft ammunition. In underground tunnels below the fort, which had housed a headquarters of some type, Dobson’s men found quantities of significant documents, including an arms agreement recently signed by Nicaragua, Cuba, Grenada and the Soviet Union.”

Covering the evacuation of American students, a US soldier cradles a M60 general-purpose machine gun.

Covering the evacuation of American students, a US soldier cradles a M60 general-purpose machine gun.
The barefoot grenadier: an M16/M203-armed soldier enjoys the weather on Grenada.

The barefoot grenadier: an M16/M203-armed soldier enjoys the weather on Grenada.
A Marine radio operator on Grenada armed with a M16A1.

A Marine radio operator on Grenada armed with a M16A1.

Clearly, communist forces in the Caribbean were preparing to expand their influence out from Grenada, turn the 135 square-mile island nation into a fortress or both. The “Island of Spice” was filled up with a lot more than nutmeg. Major Rivard’s report details the firearms discovered by U.S. forces:

“There were about 10,000 rifles, including assault rifles, sniper rifles and carbines; more than 4,500 machine guns, 294 portable rocket launchers with 16,000 rockets. In addition to this, there were 60 anti-aircraft guns of various sizes including almost 600,000 rounds of ammunition and 30 57 mm ZIS-2 anti-tank guns with about 10,000 rounds of ammunition. Finally, 60 armored personnel carriers, 30 76 mm ZIS-2 field guns and 20,000 uniforms were also found. Large amounts of this equipment were captured still in shipping crates stored in warehouses.”

Classic Small Arms of the Cold War

The fighting on Grenada was a microcosm of the Cold War and a technological snapshot of a conventional engagement between western and communist forces. Most of the small arms used during Urgent Fury are well-known players, the U.S. M16A2 and the M60 machine gun versus the Soviet AK-47 and PKM GPMG. The island’s location gave some of the Grenadian small arms a certain uniqueness.

Every Marine a rifleman: a USMC M16A1 in action on Grenada.

Every Marine a rifleman: a USMC M16A1 in action on Grenada.
A ride home: a trooper of the 82nd Airborne behind the wheel of an M151 1/4-ton utility vehicle (the “Mutt”), featuring an M60 on the pedestal mount.

A ride home: a trooper of the 82nd Airborne behind the wheel of an M151 1/4-ton utility vehicle (the “Mutt”), featuring an M60 on the pedestal mount.
The paratroopers come a-knocking. Men of the 82nd Airborne clear houses on their sweep through Grenada. Both carry M16A1 rifles and M72 LAW (66 mm) anti-tank weapons.

The paratroopers come a-knocking. Men of the 82nd Airborne clear houses on their sweep through Grenada. Both carry M16A1 rifles and M72 LAW (66 mm) anti-tank weapons.

M1 carbines were a part of the mix. Soviet M44 bolt-action carbines were also there. So were a few British Bren guns chambered in 7.62×51 mm NATO. The Cubans sent a few older Czech-made firearms to Grenada, including the vz. 52/57 semi-automatic rifle and the rare vz. 52/57 light machine gun (both in 7.62x39mm).

Kind of a Big Deal

I have a couple of friends who were part of Operation Urgent Fury, and for years, they have described the invasion to me as “not a big deal.” For years, I have let them get away with under-selling it. Looking back and realizing the large (and growing) firearms stockpile on Grenada at that time, the operation was rather important. America simply could not let more communist dominoes fall in the Caribbean or in South America. Urgent Fury helped keep the Cold War from reaching a boiling point while also keeping communism contained. Just six years later, the Berlin Wall would come down, and the Soviet Union fell with it. Of the opposing players, only Cuba remains today.

Evacuees board a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter mounting a stripped-down M60D machine gun, featuring spade grips and a canvas bag to catch ejected spent casings.

Evacuees board a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter mounting a stripped-down M60D machine gun, featuring spade grips and a canvas bag to catch ejected spent casings.
M151 “Mutt” sporting a pair of M60 machine guns, as well as a wire-cutting bar attached to the front grill.

M151 “Mutt” sporting a pair of M60 machine guns, as well as a wire-cutting bar attached to the front grill.
Officers and men of the 82nd Airborne test out a captured PKM machine gun (with a 100-round ammunition belt container).

Officers and men of the 82nd Airborne test out a captured PKM machine gun (with a 100-round ammunition belt container).

Ultimately, 19 American troops were killed in Operation Urgent Fury, and nearly 120 were wounded. Communist forces lost 45 dead and nearly 350 wounded.  This was the price to halt Soviet and Cuban communist expansion in the Caribbean. The American students on the island were returned safely to the U.S. Democracy was restored in Grenada, a free nation where they now call Oct. 25 “Thanksgiving Day”.

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Why is it that I think that this is based on a previous & recent event?

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One of the better films about Army Basic Training (It has been over 35 years ago when I was at Ft Dix NJ for Basic)

https://youtu.be/DeUh_uFHh2c

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Allies The Green Machine Well I thought it was funny!

I remember a certain 1st Shirt like that!

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The Green Machine

Join the Army they said , it will be a lot of fun !

Gabrielle Chaffins, a Colorado Springs high school senior and Future  Soldier, gets up close and personal with drill sergeants during a “shark  attack” at Pershing Field March 4, 2017 [3396x3380]: MilitaryPorn

Been there done that! That & I would never do it again for a Million Buck. Nor would I sell my memories for that either! But all in all it was one of the smartest things that I have ever done. Grumpy

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28 Years!!! I guess it better than never but come on!

‘Black Hawk Down’ Rangers Receive Silver Stars 28 Years After Mogadishu Heroics

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Soldiers of B Company, 2nd Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, watch helicopter activity over Mogadishu
Soldiers of B Company, 2nd Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, watch helicopter activity over Mogadishu on Oct. 3, 1993. (U.S. Army)

FORT BENNING, Ga. — During 23 years in the Army — much of it in the elite ranks of the 75th Ranger Regiment — Jeff Struecker saw combat in Panama, Iraq and Afghanistan, but nothing compared to the infamous October 1993 gunfight through the streets of Mogadishu.

“I’d been to combat a couple of times before Somalia and a lot of times after, but I’ve never seen heroism, I’ve never seen fighting, like we saw among these guys on the streets of Mogadishu, Somalia,” said Struecker, one of 18 veterans who fought in the battle officially known as Operation Gothic Serpent and awarded the Silver Star for valor Friday. “Nothing came close to Somalia. I mean not even close.”

The Silver Stars presented in a ceremony at Fort Benning, Ga., for those who were serving 28 years ago in the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment were upgrades of Bronze Star medals with combat “V” for valor that the Rangers were presented months after returning from Somalia. The Battle of Mogadishu, in which 18 American soldiers were killed, was later made famous by the best-selling book “Black Hawk Down” and the Hollywood movie of the same name.

For Struecker, the honor was “bittersweet” and unexpected. He said others who fought in that battle were more deserving of the Silver Star, the nation’s third highest honor for battlefield heroics. He said he was particularly proud to see some of the other troops from that fight honored.

“It’s truly an honor,” said Sean Watson, who was a sergeant first class at the time and would go on to retire as a command sergeant major in 2015. “I believe that being an awardee is actually a representation of everybody in the position I was in. They earned it — they’re the ones who really earned this.”

Related5 Things You Didn’t Know About ‘Black Hawk Down’

The Army announced in July, 60 veterans of the battle — mostly Army special operators, many of whom have not been named publicly — would receive award upgrades for their actions in the fight. That includes 58 Silver Stars and two Distinguished Flying Crosses. Award ceremonies are planned for other units in the future, Army officials said Friday.

The fight

The battle broke out as American special operators — primarily Rangers, and other elite soldiers from the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment and 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta, or Delta Force — set out to capture two top lieutenants of warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid, who was responsible for attacks on U.N. peacekeeping troops working to end civil war in Somalia.

The assault force was inserted into the city by helicopter, and another element was to follow that group into the city in Humvees, according to the Army, which said many elements of the battle remain classified despite the enormous attention it has received publicly.

Struecker, then a staff sergeant with the Rangers’ 3rd Battalion, was leading a squad assigned as the ground reaction force to support the helicopter-borne troops entering Aidid’s stronghold in the Bakara Market. The helicopter assault force went in first to search for the warlord’s henchmen and the ground force came into the market later, according to the Army’s description of the battle.

It was the Rangers’ seventh mission in Somalia, but this one, Struecker said, was in broad daylight in a well-defended part of Mogadishu with an unknown number of enemy fighters.

“This is the middle of bad-guy territory, and we’re kicking down the door and walking into the heart of it,” he said. “You know as soon as you get in it’s going to be a fight, and it’s going to be a fight the whole time that you’re in there, and it’s going to be a fight until you get out. All of us knew that. What I don’t think anyone anticipated was the sheer numbers.”

That U.S. force of less than 200 operators would find itself in a fight with some 10,000 to 12,000 well-armed Somali fighters. After the assault force nabbed Aidid’s aides, militants attacked the troops and shot down two MH-60 Black Hawk helicopters with rocket-propelled grenades — something the Army had never seen before, officials said.

It set off a frantic mission to secure the locations of the downed Black Hawks and recover wounded and fallen Americans. U.S. special operators would spend 18 hours running and fighting their way through the city’s streets, according to the Army.

Struecker, 52, led his ground unit through the city three times as the battle raged. Their Humvees were “like bullet magnets,” he recalled. His Silver Star citation credits him with repeatedly sacrificing “his own personal safety” to help other soldiers.

“We go back and forth, in and out of the city all night long,” Struecker said. “The Humvees are the biggest, easiest target to hit out there, and so we’re losing guys right around me.”

Dominick Pilla, a sergeant and machine gunner, was just behind Struecker when he was shot and killed — the first American death in the battle. His Silver Star citation credits Pilla with “suppressing numerous enemy positions while under fire himself.” His heroics, it added, saved “the lives of all the other Rangers” with him at the time. He was 21.

Meanwhile, Watson — a platoon sergeant at the time who had entered the fight by helicopter — moved his force toward one of the downed Black Hawks, fighting their way through the city. His Silver Star citation credited him with securing the crash site from enemy forces “until reinforcements came the next morning.”

It was brutal work, Watson said. But he was awed by the actions of the Rangers and others around him.

“It was something to behold from my position to watch what was going on — the way they performed,” he said. “It was beyond compare.”

The fall out

Three of the four pilots in the downed Black Hawks would die, and the fourth was captured and later released.

Two Delta Force operators — Master Sgt. Gary Gordon and Sgt. 1st Class Randy Shughart — were posthumously awarded Medals of Honor for their actions to secure the site of one of the Black Hawk crashes to recover survivors. Both of those operators were among the U.S. dead in the fight.

In all, 73 U.S. troops were injured in the battle, according to the Army. The botched mission left a long-lasting mark on American foreign policy after television news broadcast images of an U.S. soldier’s body dragged through Mogadishu’s streets as locals cheered.

The defense secretary at the time, Les Aspin, would resign his post in wake of the battle. Ultimately, former President Bill Clinton elected to end the mission to capture Aidid and he removed all U.S. forces from Somalia by March 1994. U.S. troops would not return to the country until 2007.

The book “Black Hawk Down” would be published in 1999, receiving high praise for its detailed retelling of the battle. In 2002, the movie brought the Battle of Mogadishu onto American screens in the months after the first U.S. troops invaded Afghanistan in response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Struecker, who would commission as an officer after 10 years of enlisted service and serve as a chaplain until retiring as a major in 2011, described the book as an “extraordinarily accurate” accounting of the battle. The movie, he said, followed the book closely, though it took some liberties — blending several events into a single incident or multiple characters into a single individual.

“What you see in the movie ‘Black Hawk Down’ basically happened,” he said. “It’s about as accurate as you’re going to get. It’s not a documentary, but for a major motion picture, I don’t know how you can make it much more accurate.

“The difference, for those of us who were there, right, is the violence,” Struecker said. “It isn’t even close to the real thing — the level of violence, of course.”

Watson said he rarely talks about his time in Mogadishu, and he does not think about it very often, either. Later, he deployed to Afghanistan three times and saw combat there. But, like Struecker, he said the fighting there was incomparable to Mogadishu.

“I felt very fortunate that I never was in the extreme position that I was in Somalia ever again,” he said. “Was I prepared for it? Yes, I was. I was very prepared. And it was a lot. And, thankfully, [fighting] never, ever occurred at that level again for me.”

At A Glance:

The Army on Friday presented 18 Silver Star medals to former members of the Fort Benning, Ga.-based 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment for their actions in Mogadishu, Somalia, on Oct. 3 and Oct. 4, 1993. The awards were upgrades of the Bronze Star medals with combat “V” device for valor that the Rangers received shortly after the battle — among the most infamous fights in recent decades in which U.S. troops fought.

Those receiving the Silver Star on Friday were (ranks at the time of the battle):

Sgt. Alan Barton

Sgt. John C. Belman

Staff Sgt. Kenneth P. Boorn

Spc. James M. Cavaco*

Spc. John M. Collett

Staff Sgt. Michael Collins

Sgt. James C. Joyce*

Pfc. Brad M. Paulsen

2nd Lt. Larry D. Perino

Spc. Robert R. Phipps II

Sgt. Dominick M. Pilla*

Sgt. Randall J. Ramaglia Jr.

Pfc. John D. Stanfield

Cpt. Michael Steele

Spc. Richard Strous

Staff Sgt. Jeffrey D. Struecker

Spc. Joseph F. Thomas

Sgt. 1st Class Sean T. Watson

*Denotes posthumous award to Rangers who died of wounds suffered in Somalia

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The Green Machine

Not this Mans Army anymore I guess!

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Fire Power: Artillery – The Big Picture

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All About Guns The Green Machine

Vietnam War Era Training Video: Operation of the M16