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Manly Stuff

What a real Field Soldier looks like!

PFC Floyd L. Rogers from Texas and with ‘C’ Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, US 2nd Division in Northern France, June 29 1944. (Note the German camo helmet cover). 
He was killed less than two weeks after this picture was taken, on July 12,1944. At the time of this photo, he had received credit for killing 27 enemy snipers with his (BAR) Browning Automatic Rifle.
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Hard Nosed Folks Both Good & Bad Manly Stuff

Here is the youngest and oldest living Medal of Honor recipients taking a picture together. Stolen from The daily Timewaster a great Blog by the way!

Here is Hershel Williams Medal of Honor citation signed by Harry Truman: “For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Demolition Sergeant serving with the First Battalion, Twenty-First Marines, Third Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on Iwo Jima, Volcano Island, 23 February 1945. Quick to volunteer his services when our tanks were maneuvering vainly to open a lane for the infantry through the network of reinforced concrete pillboxes, buried mines and black, volcanic sands, Corporal Williams daringly went forward alone to attempt the reduction of devastating machine-gun fire from the unyielding positions. Covered only by four riflemen, he fought desperately for four hours under terrific enemy small-arms fire and repeatedly returned to his own lines to prepare demolition charges and obtain serviced flame throwers, struggling back, frequently to the rear of hostile emplacements, to wipe out one position after another. On one occasion he daringly mounted a pillbox to insert the nozzle of his flame thrower through the air vent, kill the occupants and silence the gun; on another he grimly charged enemy riflemen who attempted to stop him with bayonets and destroyed them with a burst of flame from his weapon. His unyielding determination and extraordinary heroism in the face of ruthless enemy resistance were directly instrumental in neutralizing one of the most fanatically defended Japanese strong points encountered by his regiment and aided in enabling his company to reach its objective. Corporal Williams’ aggressive fighting spirit and valiant devotion to duty throughout this fiercely contested action sustain and enhance the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.”
***
Lance Corporal William “Kyle” Carpenter, United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as an Automatic Rifleman with Company F, 2d Battalion, 9th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 1, 1st Marine Division (Forward), 1 Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Helmand Province, Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom on 21 November 2010. Lance Corporal Carpenter was a member of a platoon-sized coalition force, comprised of two reinforced Marine squads partnered with an Afghan National Army squad. The platoon had established Patrol Base Dakota two days earlier in a small village in the Marjah District in order to disrupt enemy activity and provide security for the local Afghan population. Lance Corporal Carpenter and a fellow Marine were manning a rooftop security position on the perimeter of Patrol Base Dakota when the enemy initiated a daylight attack with hand grenades, one of which landed inside their sandbagged position. Without hesitation, and with complete disregard for his own safety, Lance Corporal Carpenter moved toward the grenade in an attempt to shield his fellow Marine from the deadly blast. When the grenade detonated, his body absorbed the brunt of the blast, severely wounding him, but saving the life of his fellow Marine. By his undaunted courage, bold fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of almost certain death, Lance Corporal Carpenter reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.”
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Manly Stuff

Some Red Hot Gospel there!

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A Victory! Hard Nosed Folks Both Good & Bad I am so grateful!! Manly Stuff One Hell of a Good Fight Our Great Kids Stand & Deliver This great Nation & Its People

Makes one proud to be an American!

Todd Beamer – A true American hero if ever there was one.

 

This is the word-for-word transcript of Todd’s phone call reporting the hijacking of Flight 93.

Todd: Hello… Operator…listen to me…I can’t speak very loud. – This is an emergency. I’m a passenger on a United flight to San Francisco..  We have a situation here….Our plane has been hijacked…..can you understand me?

Lisa: (exhaling a deep breath to herself) I understand… Can the hijackers see you talking on the phone?

Todd: No

Lisa: Can you tell me how many hijackers are on the plane?

Todd: There are three that we know of.

Lisa: Can you see any weapons? What kind of weapons do they have?

Todd: Yes…. they don’t have guns….they have knives – they took over the plane with knives.

Lisa: Do you mean…like steak knives?

Todd: No, these are razor knives…like box cutters.

Lisa: Can you tell what country these people are from?

Todd: No…..I don’t know. They sound like they’re from the mid-east.

Lisa: Have they said what they want?

Todd: Someone announced from the cockpit that there was a bomb on board.  He said he was the captain and to stay in our seats and stay quiet.

He said that they were meeting these men’s demands and returning to the airport… It was very broken English, and… I’m telling you…it sounded fake!

Lisa: Ok sir, please give me your name.

Todd: My name is Todd Beamer.

Lisa: Ok Todd….my name is Lisa…Do you know your flight number? If you can’t remember, it’s on your ticket.

Todd: It’s United Flight 93.

Lisa: Now Todd, can you try to tell me exactly what happened?

Todd: Two of the hijackers were sitting in first class near the cockpit.  A third one was sitting near the back of the coach section. The two up. front got into the cockpit somehow; there was shouting. The third hijacker said he had a bomb. It looks like a bomb. He’s got it tied to his waist with a red belt of some kind.

Lisa: So is the door to the cockpit open?

Todd: No, the hijackers shut it behind them.

Lisa: Has anyone been injured?

Todd: Yes, ..they…they killed one passenger sitting in first class. There’s been lots of shouting. We don’t know if the pilots are dead or alive. A flight attendant told me that the pilot and copilot had been forced from the cockpit and may have been wounded.

Lisa: Where is the 3rd hijacker now Todd?

Todd: He’s near the back of the plane. They forced most of the passengers into first class. There are fourteen of us here in the back. Five are flight attendants. He hasn’t noticed that I slipped into this pantry to get the phone. The guy with the bomb ordered us to sit on the floor in the rear of the plane……….oh Jesus.. Help!

Lisa: Todd….are you ok? Tell me what’s happening!

Todd: Hello…..We’re going down….I think we’re going to crash……Wait – wait a minute. No, we’re leveling off….we’re ok. I think we may be turning around…..That’s it – we changed directions.  Do you hear me….we’re flying east again.

Lisa: Ok Todd…. What’s going on with the other passengers?

Todd: Everyone is… really scared. A few passengers with cell phones have made calls to relatives. A guy, Jeremy, was talking to his wife just before the hijacking started. She told him that hijackers had crashed two planes into the World Trade Center……Lisa is that true??

Lisa: Todd…..I have to tell you the truth…..it’s very bad.  The World Trade Center is gone. Both of the towers have been destroyed.

Todd: Oh God —help us!

Lisa: A third plane was taken over by terrorists. It crashed into the Pentagon in Washington DC. Our country is under attack….and I’m afraid that your plane may be part of their plan.

Todd: Oh dear God. Dear God…….Lisa, will you do something for me?

Lisa: I’ll try….if I can….Yes.

Todd: I want you to call my wife and my kids for me and tell them what’s happened. Promise me you’ll call..

Lisa: I promise – I’ll call.

Todd: Our home number is 201 353-***3…….You have the same name as my wife…Lisa….We’ve been married for 10 years. She’s pregnant with our 3rd child. Tell her that I love her…….(choking up)..I’ll always love her..(clearing throat) We have two boys.. David, he’s 3 and Andrew, he’s 1…..Tell them……(choking) tell them that their daddy loves them and that he is so proud of them. (clearing throat again) Our baby is due January 12th…..I saw an ultra sound…..it was great….we still don’t know if it’s a girl or a boy………Lisa?

Lisa: (barely able to speak) I’ll tell them, I promise Todd.

Todd: I’m going back to the group—if I can get back I will…

Lisa: Todd, leave this line open…are you still there?……

Lisa: (dials the phone..) Hello, FBI, my name is Lisa Jefferson, I’m a telephone supervisor for GTE. I need to report a terrorist hijacking of a United Airlines Flight 93….Yes I’ll hold.

Goodwin: Hello, this is Agent Goodwin.. I understand you have a hijacking situation?

Lisa: Yes sir, I’ve been talking with a passenger, a Todd Beamer, on Flight 93 who managed to get to an air phone unnoticed.

Goodwin: Where did this flight originate, and what was its destination?

Lisa: The flight left Newark New Jersey at 8 A.M. departing for San Francisco. The hijackers took over the plane shortly after takeoff, and several minutes later the plane changed course – it is now flying east.

Goodwin: Ms. Jefferson…I need to talk to someone aboard that plane. Can you get me thru to the planes phone?

Lisa: I still have that line open sir, I can patch you through on a conference call…hold a mo…..

Todd: Hello Lisa, Lisa are you there?

Lisa: Yes, I’m here. Todd, I made a call to the FBI, Agent Goodwin is on the line and will be talking to you as well.

Todd: The others all know that this isn’t your normal hijacking. Jeremy called his wife again on his cell phone. She told him more about the World Trade Center and all.

Goodwin: Hello Todd. This is Agent Goodwin with the FBI. We have been monitoring your flight. Your plane is on a course for Washington, DC. These terrorists sent two planes into the World Trade Center and one plane into the Pentagon. Our best guess is that they plan to fly your plane into either the White House or the United States Capital Building.

Todd: I understand…hold on……I’ll…….I’ll be back..

Lisa: Mr. Goodwin, how much time do they have before they get to Washington?

Goodwin: Not long ma’am. They changed course over Cleveland; they’re approaching Pittsburgh now. Washington may be twenty minutes away.

Todd: (breathing a little heavier) The plane seems to be changing directions just a little. It’s getting pretty rough up here. The plane is flying real erratic….We’re not going to make it out of here. Listen to me….I want you to hear this….I have talked with the others….we have decided we would not be pawns in these hijackers suicidal plot.

Lisa: Todd, what are you going to do?

Todd: We’ve hatched a plan. Four of us are going to rush the hijacker with the bomb. After we take him out, we’ll break into the cockpit. A stewardess is getting some boiling water to throw on the hijackers at the controls. We’ll get them….and we’ll take them out. Lisa, …..will you do one last thing for me?

Lisa: Yes…What is it?

Todd: Would you pray with me?

They pray: Our father which art in Heaven

Hallowed be thy name,

Thy kingdom come, thy will be done

on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread,

And forgive us our trespasses

As we forgive our trespassers,

And lead us not into temptation

But deliver us from evil

For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory

Forever…..Amen

The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want…

He makes me to lie down in green pastures

He leads me beside the still waters

He restores my soul

He leads me in paths of righteousness

for His name’s sake

Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death

I will fear no evil, for thou art with me…..

Todd: (softer) God help me…Jesus help me….(clears throat and louder)

Are you guys ready?……..

Let’s Roll.

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A Victory! All About Guns Manly Stuff Soldiering The Green Machine War

The Battle of Peleliu and Its Relics by Martin K.A. Morgan

The Battle of Peleliu and Its Relics
In the aftermath of World War I, the Japanese Empire assumed administrative control of these islands through the League of Nations South Pacific Mandate established by the Versailles Treaty. Through the 1920s and 1930s, they improved infrastructure in Palau, developed commerce and eventually even militarized the islands by building seaplane bases, a submarine base and airfields.

Map of Peleliu by the author.

Map of Peleliu by the author.

By 1944, those installations posed a threat to the contemplated U.S. landings on Mindanao in the Philippines scheduled for later that year, so a decision was made to preempt the threat. This would be done through amphibious assaults against two Palauan islands, Anguar and Peleliu.
The larger of the two, Peleliu, was home to an Imperial Army airfield equipped with aircraft revetments, taxiways, a large, concrete headquarters building and a pair of intersecting runways capable of accommodating twin-engine bombers. With Mindanao just 500 miles away to the west and Guam just 800 miles away to the northeast, long range aircraft from Peleliu’s airfield could reach both the Philippines and the Marianas.

The first wave of LVTs moves toward the invasion beaches of Peleliu , on Sept. 15, 1944, passing through the inshore bombardment line of LCI gunboats. Cruisers and battleships are bombarding from the distance. The landing area is almost totally hidden in dust and smoke. Photographed by a floatplane from USS HONOLULU (CL-48). U.S. Navy photograph # 80-G-283533.

The first wave of LVTs moves toward the invasion beaches of Peleliu , on Sept. 15, 1944, passing through the inshore bombardment line of LCI gunboats. Cruisers and battleships are bombarding from the distance. The landing area is almost totally hidden in dust and smoke. Photographed by a floatplane from USS HONOLULU (CL-48). U.S. Navy photograph # 80-G-283533.

In the end, U.S. leadership canceled the invasion of Mindanao but not the Palau operation, which kicked-off on Sept. 15, 1944, when the 1st Marine Division stormed ashore on the western beaches of Peleliu. In the weeks that followed, the fighting reached an appalling intensity that foreshadowed battles yet to come.
It would eventually claim the lives of almost the entire Japanese island garrison of more than 10,000 men in addition to 1,794 Americans. The fighting also left Peleliu strewn with the debris of war. Even today, despite an ongoing de-mining operation, live hand grenades, mortar rounds, artillery shells and small arms ammunition litter the jungle.
 

U.S. Marines taking cover behind a knocked out LVT (Landing Vehicle, Tracked) nicknamed “The Bloody Trail” during the first day of the Battle of Peleliu. Note the left-handed Marine firing his M1 rifle. (Marine Corps Photo 21-4).

U.S. Marines taking cover behind a knocked out LVT (Landing Vehicle, Tracked) nicknamed “The Bloody Trail” during the first day of the Battle of Peleliu. Note the left-handed Marine firing his M1 rifle. (Marine Corps Photo 21-4).

The keen-eyed student of small arms will also find that guns are still there, too. A standard tourist visit to Peleliu today begins where the battle began on the invasion beaches of the island’s southwest coast, which is where the 1st Marine Division began the battle on Sept. 15 by landing three regiments abreast. The 1st Marines came ashore on “White Beach”, a 650-yd. concave strip of sand that represented the division’s far-left flank.
At the far northern end of the sector, a natural rock outcropping known as “The Point” juts out 15 yds. from the shoreline and the Japanese concealed a concrete bunker for a 25 mm Type 96 auto cannon there. The position was oriented to direct flanking fire against anything or anyone approaching the beach, and it was backed-up by machine guns and concealed mortar positions that provided additional supporting defensive firepower.

Marines of the 16th Marine Field Depot on Peleliu’s "White Beach" after just having landed on Sept. 15, 1944. They are armed with M1903A3 rifles.  (National Archives and Records Administration – 532535/127-N-95279).

Marines of the 16th Marine Field Depot on Peleliu’s “White Beach” after just having landed on Sept. 15, 1944. They are armed with M1903A3 rifles. (National Archives and Records Administration – 532535/127-N-95279).

A 26-year-old Captain, George P. Hunt (USMCR), commanding K Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment lead the assault on “The Point” with three platoons adding up to 235 men. He later described the Japanese positions found there:
“Pillboxes, reinforced with steel and concrete, had been dug or blasted in the base of the perpendicular drop to the beach. Others, with coral and concrete piled six feet on top were constructed above, and spider holes were blasted around them for protecting infantry.”

A view of “White Beach 2” showing the spot where F Company, 1st Marines landed on Sept. 15, 1944. The smoke that can be seen at rising at center left is from a white phosphorous smoke grenade that was used against a Japanese bunker located there. Note the 37 mm M3 anti-tank gun at far right.

A view of “White Beach 2” showing the spot where F Company, 1st Marines landed on Sept. 15, 1944. The smoke that can be seen at rising at center left is from a white phosphorous smoke grenade that was used against a Japanese bunker located there. Note the 37 mm M3 anti-tank gun at far right.

Capt. Hunt’s plan was to push inland and then take on the little fortress from the rear, but three days of preliminary naval bombardment had done nothing to the position and it unleashed a relentless volume of fire.
Nevertheless, Hunt’s 1st and 3rd platoons conducted an assault during which one of his squad leaders, a 20-year-old Corporal named Henry W. Hahn, tossed a white-phosphorus smoke grenade through the casemate’s firing port. Suffocating from the combination of penetrating heat and toxic fumes, the Japanese soldiers inside attempted to escape but the white phosphorous had set them ablaze.

1st Marine Division PFCs Gerald P. Thursby of Akron, Ohio, and Douglas D. Lightheart of Jackson, Mich., smoking cigarettes shortly after having landed on Peleliu’s “White Beach 2”. (National Archives 127-N-97628).

1st Marine Division PFCs Gerald P. Thursby of Akron, Ohio, and Douglas D. Lightheart of Jackson, Mich., smoking cigarettes shortly after having landed on Peleliu’s “White Beach 2”. (National Archives 127-N-97628).

Hunt later reported that, as they spilled out of the position on fire, the rifle cartridges in their clip pouches were cooking-off in a particularly gruesome scene. Although the way the jungle has reclaimed the Japanese bunker over the decades since 1944 is stunning in its natural beauty, it is impossible to visit the site today without picturing that violent moment.
By 10:00 a.m., all of Hunt’s platoon leaders were casualties and his overall strength was 60 percent of what it had been when the landings began just after 8:30 a.m. Soon thereafter, as his men languished in the 115-degree equatorial heat, the Japanese counterattacked with supporting mortar fire in a move that severed K Company from the rest of the 3rd Battalion. Making matters even worse, Hunt’s men soon ran out of fresh water.
 

Peleliu under fire, probably during the pre-invasion bombardment, circa Sept. 12-15, 1944. Photographed from a floatplane from USS HONOLULU (CL-48). Photo looks North-East, with the airfield in the foreground and Umurbrogol Ridge in the distance, partly shrouded in smoke.  (U.S. Navy photograph #80-G-283520).

Peleliu under fire, probably during the pre-invasion bombardment, circa Sept. 12-15, 1944. Photographed from a floatplane from USS HONOLULU (CL-48). Photo looks North-East, with the airfield in the foreground and Umurbrogol Ridge in the distance, partly shrouded in smoke. (U.S. Navy photograph #80-G-283520).

Although they spent that first night on the island cut off from the rest of the 1st Marine Regiment, the Brooklyn-class light cruiser USS Honolulu (CL-48) and three destroyers provided star-shell illumination to help them turn back Japanese infiltrators. Twice during the night and then again shortly after dawn on Sept. 16, the Japanese launched bitter counterattacks against the K Company positions, but Capt. Hunt and his Marines held them off.

Marines of the 1st Marine Division firing an M1919A4 .30-caliber machine gun during the battle. From the Frederick R. Findtner Collection (COLL/3890), Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections OFFICIAL USMC PHOTOGRAPH.

Marines of the 1st Marine Division firing an M1919A4 .30-caliber machine gun during the battle. From the Frederick R. Findtner Collection (COLL/3890), Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections OFFICIAL USMC PHOTOGRAPH.

Throughout this phase of the action, Cpl. Hahn expertly directed the fire of his squad, and his leadership was instrumental in repulsing the opposing force. Once the sun was up, Capt. Hunt counted the bodies of more than 100 Japanese troops littering the area around “The Point.” In the afternoon Hunt’s Marines received resupply, but then the Japanese attacked again and the fighting reached a climax during which Henry Hahn received a fragmentation wound.
Despite the injury, he chose to lead his squad on a reconnaissance patrol that ultimately encountered a numerically superior Japanese force. Using just M1 rifles and hand grenades, Cpl. Hahn and the patrol drove the enemy back and then returned to friendly lines. Only then did he agree to being evacuated as a combat casualty.

Marines of the 1st Marine Division fighting from the cover of a coral knob. Note that the Marine in front is firing an M1928A1 Thompson submachine gun that is equipped with the simplified L-sight. OFFICIAL USMC PHOTOGRAPH.

Marines of the 1st Marine Division fighting from the cover of a coral knob. Note that the Marine in front is firing an M1928A1 Thompson submachine gun that is equipped with the simplified L-sight. OFFICIAL USMC PHOTOGRAPH.

More fighting at “The Point” continued during the second night, but by then the 5th Marines had captured the airfield and begun the push toward Peleliu’s eastern shore. For more than 30 hours, K/3/1 had survived four major counterattacks despite being surrounded, low on supplies and out of water. It had suffered 32 killed and 125 wounded, leaving only Captain Hunt and 77 Marines still capable of fighting when it all came to an end.

The author holds up live cartridges and spent shell casings he found at “The Point” during a visit to Peleliu in March, 2014.

The author holds up live cartridges and spent shell casings he found at “The Point” during a visit to Peleliu in March, 2014.

The bodies of more than 400 dead Japanese soldiers in the immediate area of the position provided a powerful indication of just how vicious an engagement it had been. Bravery, fighting spirit and the determined leadership of George Hunt as well as Henry W. Hahn had determined the outcome. Both men were ultimately recognized for their contributions when they were awarded the Navy Cross.

The M1917A1 Heavy Machine Gun receiver and top cover that the author found on White Beach about 50 ft. down from “The Point” on March 27, 2017.

The M1917A1 Heavy Machine Gun receiver and top cover that the author found on White Beach about 50 ft. down from “The Point” on March 27, 2017.

You can tell just how fierce the battle at “The Point” was by the way that the debris of battle litters the area to this day, and makes it impossible not to imagine what happened there in Sept., 1944. Shell casings and live rounds of various calibers can be easily found, but so can more substantial artifacts. On March 27, 2017, the author walked about 50 ft. down “White Beach” from “The Point” and noticed what at first appeared to be an oddly shaped rock lying in the sand.

A comparison between the M1917A1 Heavy Machine Gun receiver and top cover that the author found on White Beach on March 27, 2017 and an example in slightly better condition.

A comparison between the M1917A1 Heavy Machine Gun receiver and top cover that the author found on White Beach on March 27, 2017 and an example in slightly better condition.

On closer inspection, it turned out not to be a rock at all, but rather the receiver and top cover of a Browning M1917A1 .30-cal. heavy machine gun. How it ended-up on “White Beach” would be a matter of pure speculation at this point, but it was there, and the author felt it best to see to its preservation, so he took it to the island’s museum. It remains on display there now with a simple note describing where and when it was discovered.
 

Two 7.7 mm Type 97 aircraft machine guns in relic condition on display in Peleliu’s museum.

Two 7.7 mm Type 97 aircraft machine guns in relic condition on display in Peleliu’s museum.

Peleliu’s museum is a collection of artifacts from the battle and it is housed in a concrete Japanese blockhouse located near the airfield. During the naval bombardment that preceded the Sept. 15 amphibious landings, battleship USS Pennsylvania (BB-38) scored a direct hit on this structure. The evidence of which can still be seen today in the form of a gaping hole in the wall where a 14” shell passed through the concrete.

Five M1918A2 Browning Automatic Rifles in relic condition on display in Peleliu’s museum.

Five M1918A2 Browning Automatic Rifles in relic condition on display in Peleliu’s museum.

The collection inside the blockhouse includes a number of relic-condition firearms recovered on the battlefield during the decades after the battle. There are examples of the BARs, Type 92 heavy machine guns and other weapons used during the 73-day clash of arms that forever changed the complexion of the island. In addition to artifacts on display inside the blockhouse, there are artifacts on display outside as well.

The author poses in front of an LVT(A)-4 AmTrac located near the end of one of the runways of Peleliu’s old airfield while holding the upper receiver of a relic condition M1928A1 Thompson submachine gun.

The author poses in front of an LVT(A)-4 AmTrac located near the end of one of the runways of Peleliu’s old airfield while holding the upper receiver of a relic condition M1928A1 Thompson submachine gun.

At several locations on Peleliu, World War II military vehicles can be seen. This includes an M1 Medium Tractor (the military designation for the Allis-Chalmers HD-7W) at the base of Hill 100, a Japanese Type 95 Ha-Gō light tank on the airfield and several examples of one of the most important vehicles of the Pacific war, the Amphibious Tractor or AmTrac. Because it was capable of transporting personnel from ships in deep water all the way to the beach and beyond, the AmTrac, also known as Landing Vehicle Tracked or “LVT”, played an indispensable part in every amphibious landing in the Pacific Theatre.

The upper receiver of a relic condition M1928A1 Thompson submachine gun found near Peleliu’s old airfield in March, 2014.

The upper receiver of a relic condition M1928A1 Thompson submachine gun found near Peleliu’s old airfield in March, 2014.

Examples of the standard configuration LVT can be found at several locations on the island today, but Peleliu also continues to be home to LVTs that were specially modified to provide supporting fire for the infantry during the first wave of an assault landing. One version is the LVT(A)-1, which mounts a turret armed with a 37 mm gun and the other version is the LVT(A)-4, an example of which is located near the end of one of the old runways, which mounts a turret armed with a 75 mm howitzer.

The upper receiver of a relic condition M1928A1 Thompson submachine gun sits on the left side track sponson of an LVT(A)-4 AmTrac located near the end of one of the runways of Peleliu’s old airfield.

The upper receiver of a relic condition M1928A1 Thompson submachine gun sits on the left side track sponson of an LVT(A)-4 AmTrac located near the end of one of the runways of Peleliu’s old airfield.

During a visit to Peleliu in March 2014, the author stopped at the LVT(A)-4 for a few photographs and noticed an otherwise unremarkable piece of rusted metal on the vehicle’s left side track sponson. Under closer examination, the object turned out to be the receiver of an M1928A1 Thompson submachine gun.
There was no bolt, no actuator, the Cutts compensator was rusted away along with the rear sight, and the fire control group was missing. Otherwise it was unmistakably a Thompson. The Republic of Palau prohibits the removal of any military artifacts, so after a few photographs, the receiver went right back where it was found on the LVT(A)-4.
By the end of the first week of the battle of Peleliu, the 1st Marine Division had captured the entire southern end of the island. The fighting had been tough, and the casualties had been high with 70 percent in the 1st Marine Regiment. However, everything was about to take a turn for the worse because the terrain over which the Americans would now have to maneuver was about to become much more complicated.

A 1st Marine Division radioman with a Motorola SCR-300 "Walkie-Talkie" backpack radio rushes forward during the battle of Peleliu. (National Archives File #80-G-48359/WAR & CONFLICT #1181).

A 1st Marine Division radioman with a Motorola SCR-300 “Walkie-Talkie” backpack radio rushes forward during the battle of Peleliu. (National Archives File #80-G-48359/WAR & CONFLICT #1181).

With the loss of the western beaches and the airfield, Japanese forces on Peleliu withdrew into defensive positions within the island’s central hill mass, a complex of jagged limestone ridges, knobs, gulches, sinkholes and caves known as the Umurbrogol. Within the setting of this broken and rubble-strewn terrain, the Americans would have to fight the kind of attritional warfare that the 1st Marines could no longer endure. Having sustained massive combat casualties during the opening phase of the battle, the regiment had ceased to be an effective fighting force.

Picking their way through the rocky terrain of the Umurbrogol, a column of Marines moves up to the front lines. From the Photograph Collection (COLL/3948), Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections OFFICIAL USMC PHOTOGRAPH.

Picking their way through the rocky terrain of the Umurbrogol, a column of Marines moves up to the front lines. From the Photograph Collection (COLL/3948), Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections OFFICIAL USMC PHOTOGRAPH.

If the fight was to continue, it would be necessary to bring in reinforcements and that was done on Sept. 23 when the 321st Regimental Combat Team of the Army’s 81st Infantry Division landed on the island’s western coast. Fighting alongside the Marines, soldiers from the 321st pushed across a trail at the northern end of the Umurbrogol in a move that, by the afternoon of Sept. 26, had isolated a force of approximately 2,000 Japanese defenders in a pocket that it would take five U.S. regiments almost two months to reduce.

A Marine War Dog handler reads a note just delivered by his canine messenger during the battle. Note the Model 1897 Trench Shotgun at left. Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections OFFICIAL USMC PHOTOGRAPH.

A Marine War Dog handler reads a note just delivered by his canine messenger during the battle. Note the Model 1897 Trench Shotgun at left. Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections OFFICIAL USMC PHOTOGRAPH.

It was roughly 900 yds. long and 400 yds. wide, and consisted of “some of the most unpleasantly exotic terrain on the face of creation,” as one veteran would later describe it. The Umurbrogol pocket’s coral formations were littered with jagged boulders and rubble that made it difficult to move, and its steep slopes meant that there was no place for the attacker to hide. By committing to a defensive fight-to-the-death in fixed positions in the hill mass, the Japanese abandoned all possibility of a maneuver battle on the island and, by extension, they had abandoned all possibility of repelling U.S. forces.

Two photographs showing a Marine of the 1st Marine Division fighting on Peleliu with an M1A1 Thompson submachine gun that is equipped with the simplified L-sight. OFFICIAL USMC PHOTOGRAPH.

Two photographs showing a Marine of the 1st Marine Division fighting on Peleliu with an M1A1 Thompson submachine gun that is equipped with the simplified L-sight. OFFICIAL USMC PHOTOGRAPH.

After the fall of Saipan nearly three months earlier, the Imperial armed forces realized that pointless “banzai” charges were unproductive and wasteful, and so they would not be used on Peleliu. Instead, the fighting there would take the character of an attritional slogging match intended to stretch the battle out as long as possible and tie-up U.S. troops for the greatest length of time possible.
Although other protracted defensive battles would follow on Iwo Jima and Okinawa, Peleliu would be the proving ground where the strategy would be tested for the first time, and this is why September eventually gave way to October with no end in sight. For the troops engaged in ground combat operations, the adversities continued unabated because in southern Palau, even during autumn months, the daily high temperature rises to a sweltering 105 degrees.

Marines of the 1st Marine Division engaged in the type of fighting that typified the struggle for the Umurbrogol Pocket. Mk. 2 Fragmentation Hand Grenades are seen here alongside the M1 Rifle, one example of which is equipped with the M7 Rifle Grenade Launcher

Marines of the 1st Marine Division engaged in the type of fighting that typified the struggle for the Umurbrogol Pocket. Mk. 2 Fragmentation Hand Grenades are seen here alongside the M1 Rifle, one example of which is equipped with the M7 Rifle Grenade Launcher

By this point, it was two weeks since the initial landings, and despite the immense firepower brought to bear against the island, the struggle on it had produced 5,000 dead and wounded. When the 7th Marines took over the mission to reduce the pocket on Sept. 29, it began a two-week rotation during which the regiment would sustain 46-percent casualties. That high rate was produced mainly by a technique known as “corkscrew and blow torch” that employed the satchel charge and the flamethrower as the only means of making progress.

Sherman medium tanks from the 1st and 3rd platoons of A Company, 710th Tank Battalion moving into Peleliu’s Mortimer Valley past Grinlinton Pond on Oct. 7, 1944. (U.S. Marine Corps photograph #97433).

Sherman medium tanks from the 1st and 3rd platoons of A Company, 710th Tank Battalion moving into Peleliu’s Mortimer Valley past Grinlinton Pond on Oct. 7, 1944. (U.S. Marine Corps photograph #97433).

Even with artillery support, close air support and the extensive use of flamethrower tanks, the slogging match continued to wound and kill at an astonishing rate. Because of this, Marines and soldiers began referring to the Umurbrogol as “Bloody Nose Ridge” in acknowledgement of the brutal and unrelenting fight that was unfolding within the cracks and fissures of the pocket’s coral badlands. This phase of the battle produced one of Peleliu’s most striking landmarks: a knocked-out M4 Sherman tank nicknamed “Flyin’ Home.”

The wreck of “Flyin’ Home”, a Chrysler M4 "Large-Hatch" composite hull Sherman medium tank from A Company, 710th Tank Battalion that was knocked out on Oct. 18, 1944.

The wreck of “Flyin’ Home”, a Chrysler M4 “Large-Hatch” composite hull Sherman medium tank from A Company, 710th Tank Battalion that was knocked out on Oct. 18, 1944.

In Sept., 1944, it belonged to A Company of the U.S. Army’s 710th Tank Battalion and it participated in the Battle of Anguar for a week before being transported to Peleliu to support the 1st Marine Division. On Oct. 18, “Flyin’ Home” was directing fire at Japanese forces in cave positions in the vicinity of Hill 210 when it drove over an aerial bomb that had been buried to function as an improvised anti-tank mine. The explosion breached the bottom of the Sherman and started a fire in the hull that killed S4 Otto Hasselbarth, Cpl. Michael Valentino, PFC Georges Lopes, and PFC Howard Dahms.

An M1919A4 .30-caliber machine gun can still be found in the bow mount of “Flyin’ Home”.

An M1919A4 .30-caliber machine gun can still be found in the bow mount of “Flyin’ Home”.

Today they are remembered by a memorial plaque sitting just a few feet from the wreckage, and an M1919A4 .30-caliber machine gun is still in the bow mount for the tank’s assistant driver. Two days after “Flyin’ Home” met its fate, the 81st Infantry Division relieved the 1st Marine Division completely and began mopping-up operations despite the fact that organized groups of Japanese soldiers would continue to resist for another five weeks.
One of the highlights of a visit to the island is the Battle of Peleliu Jungle Trail. This prepared footpath leads visitors into the heart of the sharp precipices of the uplifted coral plateau where the Umurbrogol pocket took its final form. The trail is strewn with U.S. and Japanese field gear: entrenching tools, mess kits, canteens and gas masks are almost everywhere you look.

The author noticed this live Type 97 fragmentation hand grenade in a cave near Hill 300 during a visit to Peleliu in March, 2014.

The author noticed this live Type 97 fragmentation hand grenade in a cave near Hill 300 during a visit to Peleliu in March, 2014.

Ominously, it is also strewn with unexploded mortar rounds, artillery shells and even the occasional hand grenade, which is unsurprising considering the unrelenting character of the fighting that took place there. It has been estimated that U.S. forces used over 118,000 hand grenades and over 150,000 mortar rounds during the battle. Even though de-mining and clearing has been going on for quite some time on the island, the Jungle Trail is a place where you can still see “Explosive Remnants of War” as they are now called.

An M1 Garand rifle that the author found on the Battle of Peleliu Jungle Trail during a visit there on March 28, 2017.

An M1 Garand rifle that the author found on the Battle of Peleliu Jungle Trail during a visit there on March 28, 2017.

During a hike there on March 28, 2017, the author had not even gone 500 ft. down the length of a feature known as “China Wall” before he spotted the unmistakable profile of an M1 Garand rifle.
Although the wood was long gone and the receiver heel was missing, the barrel, operating rod and gas cylinder confirmed that this relic was indeed a Garand that had been carried onto Peleliu by some forgotten soldier or Marine in 1944. Nearby, a loaded 15-round magazine for the M1 Carbine blended in with the natural jungle foliage to such a degree that it almost went unnoticed. Another 1,000 ft. down the trail, an M1918A2 Browning Automatic Rifle was found leaning against a rock.
 

The front of the M1 Garand rifle that the author found on the Battle of Peleliu Jungle Trail during a visit there on March 28, 2017. Note that the gas cylinder is less corroded due to being made of stainless steel.

The front of the M1 Garand rifle that the author found on the Battle of Peleliu Jungle Trail during a visit there on March 28, 2017. Note that the gas cylinder is less corroded due to being made of stainless steel.

To be a student of firearms history on Peleliu’s Jungle Trail is to experience a hallowed ground like no other, because there just isn’t a battlefield anywhere else on earth quite like it. Guam, Saipan, Tinian and Iwo Jima are close, but they are places where the march of time has moved on. They are places where the modern era feels more present than it does on Peleliu.
 

A loaded M1 Carbine magazine that the author found on the Battle of Peleliu Jungle Trail during a visit there on March 28, 2017.

A loaded M1 Carbine magazine that the author found on the Battle of Peleliu Jungle Trail during a visit there on March 28, 2017.

Even though it is now overgrown in a way that it was not during the battle, at every turn Peleliu reminds you how one of the most intense battles of the 20th Century was fought on it, especially on the Jungle Trail in the Umurbrogol pocket. By Nov. 8, there were only 300 Japanese Imperial Army soldiers left in the pocket, but still they fought on.
By Nov. 24, the Americans had captured every enemy position but one, the island’s “Last Command Post.” Col. Kunio Nakagawa, the 46-year-old commanding officer of the Imperial Army’s 2nd Infantry Regiment, had led Japanese forces throughout the vicious engagement.

A Marine on Peleliu after several days of fighting – Oct., 1944. (National Archives 80-G-48358 WAR & CONFLICT #1182).

A Marine on Peleliu after several days of fighting – Oct., 1944. (National Archives 80-G-48358 WAR & CONFLICT #1182).

After 70 days of combat, all that he had left was 120 men, more than half of which were so badly wounded that they could not fight. Col. Nakagawa understood that defeat was inevitable. Rather than surrendering or allowing himself to be captured, he burned his regimental colors and then committed ritual suicide. The Peleliu Jungle Trail will ultimately lead you to the site of his “Last Command Post,” but you have to do a little climbing to reach it.
While that place may feel more than a little haunted, for anyone interested in this chapter of World War II history there is no better place to contemplate the Battle of Peleliu, a battle that was supposed to last only three days. When the Army finally declared the island secure on Nov. 27 though, two months, one week and five days had passed.
That two months, one week and five days had been characterized by battle fatigue, heat exhaustion and disease in addition to staggering combat casualties. Peleliu was a place of blood and suffering that stood in sharp contrast to every battle that came before it and, in many ways, introduced the U.S. to the confronting reality that achieving victory in the Pacific through ground combat operations was going to be costly and time consuming.

IN THIS ARTICLE
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Allies Manly Stuff

This soldier was famous for his weapon choice

Categories
Dear Grumpy Advice on Teaching in Today's Classroom Leadership of the highest kind Manly Stuff This great Nation & Its People This looks like a lot of fun to me! Well I thought it was neat!

And some Folks think that US History is boring

How George Washington ran up a $17,253 bar tab 2 days before signing the Constitution

Eric Milzarski ,

Washington's Farewell to His Officers
George Washington bids farewell to his officers in New York. 
Washington’s Farewell to His Officers by Alonzo Chappel/Wikimedia Commons
  • George Washington and his soldiers celebrated the signing of the Constitution by racking up a $17,253 tab.
  • The soldiers were also celebrating Washington being elected as the first president of the newly independent country.
  • The exact details of the night are hazy but the receipt for the night was saved in the First Troop Cavalry archives.

America was built on alcohol. Many of the founding fathers distilled or brewed their own booze because the ingredients needed to make it flourished perfectly in the soil of the newly formed United States.

Remember, Samuel Adams isn’t just some fictional mascot made up to publicize a brewing company, and Budweiser’s “George Washington recipe” is actually historically accurate.

Also, the terrible road conditions of the time made transporting grains the traditional way, you know, in bread and stuff, a true hardship. It was much easier to just turn whatever you grew into alcohol — which would net an even better profit.

All of this is key to understanding that the founding fathers would more than likely drink any modern military barracks under the table. No single moment best exemplifies this than the time George Washington and his Army buddies celebrated the signing of the Constitution by drinking enough booze to rack up a tab worth roughly $17,253 in today’s currency.

It was the night of September 15, 1787, and George Washington had many reasons to celebrate. A few months earlier, in May, he was elected president at the Constitutional Convention. The United States Constitution had just been finalized and debates were finally settling as the momentous document cruised towards its eventual signing, just two days later. This night was also the farewell dinner for Washington before he set off to do bigger and better things.

Hey when you defeat the British Empire, a man can develop a real thirst!

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A Victory! Art Manly Stuff N.S.F.W. This great Nation & Its People Well I thought it was neat!

Happy Birthday America! NSFW!!!

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All About Guns Manly Stuff One Hell of a Good Fight

The FULL Story of the Man-Eating Lions of Tsavo

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Gear & Stuff Manly Stuff

Every man needs a pocket knife by Jack McCall

An old friend gave me a new pocket knife for Christmas last year. I decided rather than lay it up somewhere that I would “carry” it.
And I am most comfortable with a pocket knife in the bottom of my pocket. A pocket knife takes me back to my early days in Brim Hollow. My grandfather, Herod Brim, was an expert when it came to pocket knives. In the Riddleton community, he was a whittling legend.
In my mind’s eye, I can see him vividly as he sat in a cane-bottomed chair, knee-deep in cedar shavings, in the ditch across the road from Leonard Carter’s General Store.
My friend, Bobby Dias, confirmed that the whittlers used to fill that ditch with whittled cedar spirals. He went on to say that a regular prank involved someone sneaking in behind the whittlers and setting the shavings on fire.
“That would make Pa Davis so mad,” Bobby laughed.
Pa Davis, whose given name was Bethel, was a former sheriff of Smith County. My grandfather named one of his favorite dogs after Pa Davis.
I’m sure you have read about his dog, Ol’ Bethel. He’s in chapter three of my second book, “Snowflakes in Summer Time.”
My grandfather got off to a rocky start as a whittler when he attended the fair in Dixon Springs as a young boy. My mother tells of two events at the fair that made lasting impressions on him.
In those days, you could buy all the lemonade you could drink for a nickel. My grandfather spent one of his nickels on lemonade. But he drank so much, his Aunt Kit made him quit. He was not happy.
The other event involved a booth at the fair which advertised on a big banner, “Learn How to Whittle — Five Cents.” After serious consideration, young Herod decided to spend his nickel and go inside.
After all the would-be whittlers took their seats, a man came into the tent and stood before them. He took out a long piece of cedar whittling timber and pointed it toward the ground. Then, he opened a blade of his pocket knife and slowly pushed the blade of the knife toward the end. As he did, a long, slender shaving spiraled ahead of the knife blade.
When he reached the end, he looked into the eyes of those eager to learn and said, “Boys, always cut away from you, and you will never cut yourself.” Then, he turned and walked out of the tent. The demonstration was over.
My grandfather stomped out of the tent. Aunt Kit reported that she never saw him any madder, before or after. I never recall him cutting himself while whittling.
My grandfather had a small collection of pocket knives. He usually toted a Case.
But he took special pride in a John Primble and a Camillus he owned. A Schrade-Walden was another one of his favorites.
He knew knives, and he knew how to read the steel in each one. In his day, the steel in knife blades was softer than the stainless steel used today.
He took many a pocket knife home to sharpen for his friends. I recall he charged 50 cents for his work. He could put an edge on a knife blade that was plumb scary.
I remember his teaching me how a razor-sharp edge felt on the tips of my fingers. But the proof was in the shaving. He would lay the blade to his forearm and the hair would roll off at the stoke of the knife blade. Then, he would look at me with his eyebrows raised, and his eyes would sparkle.
Being a farmer, my father always carried a four-blade pocket knife. He preferred a Buck or a Boker. The largest blade usually had the tip broken off where my father had used it as a screwdriver.
One blade, the second largest with a rounded tip, was his castrating blade. To quote my father, it was always “sharp as a briar.”
Of course, on a farm, the uses of a pocket knife are endless. There are always strings to cut, cans to open and sticks to sharpen. And on Sunday at church, if the sermon got slow, you could always take out your pocket knife and clean out from under your fingernails. I recall with fondness witnessing my father doing that on many occasions.
You might say my affinity for pocket knives is a part of my heritage. That’s why I think every man should own a good pocket knife. You never know when it might come in handy.
And who knows? The world might be a better place if we had more whittlers.