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A 3.300-year old chariot bridge that is still in use today. The Arkadiko Bridge in Greece was built between 1300 and 1190 BC, making it one of the oldest still-used arch bridges in existence. Built on a road that linked Tiryns to Epidaurus

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taking a smoke break somewhere in Silesia by 
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Lessons From the Bitter End: What General Wrangel Means for Americans Today By Skip Tanner

File:Pyotr Wrangel 1920, painting.jpg - Wikimedia Commons

The Russian Civil War (1917-1921) is a conflict that’s mostly ignored by public schools. For obvious reasons, teachers’ unions and the education industry prefer to focus on the Russian Revolution (1917) only: the “workers” rose up, overthrew the conservative bad guy, and lived happily ever after until WW2. End of story, right?

The true history of the Russian Revolution and ensuing Civil War is a lot more complicated. Not many people know that the conflict involved nearly a dozen modern nations, hundreds of thousands of troops, and advanced tactics that wouldn’t be seen again until the 1940s. An astounding 12 million people died, and it’s barely covered at all.

Although there is growing awareness of the heroic efforts of Polish, Ukrainian, and Finnish forces in opposing the series of communist invasions that followed the Russian Revolution, the actual Russian effort to oppose communism by force was largely unsung until recently. The memoirs of the last leader of Russian anti-communist forces, General Pyotr Wrangel, were republished under the title Always with Honor in 2020 by an obscure publishing house, generating new interest in the man and his struggle to save his country.

The book gives a first-hand narrative of the Russian Revolution and the desperate fighting that followed. The history is interesting in its own right, but Wrangel also illustrates many lessons that Americans facing an out-of-control government and new wave of leftwing political violence should take to heart.

 

1. Understand the Stakes

 

The Russian Revolution was two separate events: the February Revolution and the October Revolution. Both occurred in 1917. During the February Revolution, Czar Nicholas II, the leader of the Russian Empire, stepping down after facing massive criticism and controversy, along with very large riots in major cities.

The Czar loved his people, and resigned because he thought it would calm a situation that had already gotten out of hand. Instead, showing weakness only emboldened radicals. A pushover liberal government replaced the Czar, allowing the Bolsheviks—communist terrorists previously excluded from government entirely—an unprecedented voice. The Bolsheviks eventually swept aside the liberals and hijacked the entire country during the October Revolution.

It’s important to understand from the get-go what radicals like the Bolsheviks want. Although the Czar voluntarily resigned to avoid conflict, the Bolsheviks arrested him and his entire family and imprisoned them in a remote villa. Then, one day, without trial or provocation, they brutally murdered the Czar, his wife, his children, their servants—even the family dogs. They did it because they wanted to and there was no one to stop them. They denied it, then they covered it up, then they celebrated it. Sound familiar?

Millions of people would be killed by communist forces or their indirect actions throughout the Russian Civil War. Millions more, through no fault of their own, had their property stolen by the communists and would be forced to live in poverty or flee their homelands altogether. The consequences of “losing” a major political upheaval are very real.

 

2. You Can’t Run from What’s Coming

 

General Wrangel was the best of Russia before the Civil War: He was a hero during World War I and the Russo-Japanese War and had even been awarded The Order of Saint Nicholas—Russian Empire’s highest medal for bravery, the equivalent of America’s Medal of Honor. He loved his country, but resigned from the military after realizing that the liberal government was trying to destroy it on the eve of the October Revolution. He moved with his wife and children to his home by sea, far away from the craziness of the capitol.

The Revolution came to him. Communist sailors (oftentimes just freed prisoners given guns and uniforms) sailed into port and began terrorizing everyone in his area. Elderly veterans, well-off people, anyone who was suspected of liking things how they had been before the Revolution was arrested for no reason. General Wrangel was one of many prominent citizens taken into custody by the sailors. He wasn’t told what he was accused of; he hadn’t been accused of anything specific. They simply arrived at his house one day and took him away.

Wrangel was handcuffed and taken by the sailors to their ship. They were killing the people they had arrested and dumping them into the harbor. They had been murdering people all day. Wrangel was saved by his wife and his servants, who followed him to loudly protest. Because Wrangel was so well-loved by his community, and the Bolsheviks had already killed so many upstanding citizens that day, the impromptu firing squad was too embarrassed to carry out the deed and let him go. Others who had no one to speak for them were not so lucky.

As much as many like to imagine that moving far away from the out-of-control cities will help, ultimately it’s not a long-term solution. The people behind radical movements are not going to let you just walk away from them. They need to be confronted head on or they will build their power and come for you eventually. Having narrowly escaped death, Wrangel set out to join the White Army, the term used to describe the loose collection of anticommunist forces that came into being after the Revolution.

 

3. You’re All in This Together—Whether You Like It or Not

 

One of the biggest tricks the Bolsheviks played during the Russian Civil War was, ironically, supporting nationalist movements. The many historical nations of the Russian Empire had long wanted independence and very understandably wanted to separate themselves from the Russian basket case after the Bolshevik takeover. When these nations said: “Let us secede,” the Bolsheviks replied: “OK.” At first, at least.

However, every single one of those nations experienced a communist takeover attempt in the following years. By the end of WW2, all of them except Finland were under direct or indirect control of the Soviet Union. This process left millions dead, billions in property stolen, and entire families sent into exile or just wiped out. The Bolsheviks wanted their enemies to be divided. Six small nations with conflicting interests are a lot easier to take on than a united front.

Reading through General Wrangel’s memoirs is painful. You can see good people fall apart instead of standing together against a clear threat. The liberal government was weak and hated by everyone, including conservatives. Although a lot of people talked about “doing something,” only the Bolsheviks took steps to organize.  General Wrangel describes the state of total confusion among Russian patriots at the time. No one was sure who they were talking to.

Conservative plots to deal with the crisis were formed and went nowhere. Two patriotic generals made a show of marching troops on the capitol to restore order, but one of the generals shot himself rather than follow through and the other was arrested. The Left used the state police and intelligence agencies, which they now controlled, to “investigate” Russian conservatives while radical leftists staged increasingly violent protests and takeovers. Military officers and dignitaries were targeted for harassment while terrorists and career criminals were allowed to act with impunity.

While this was happening, the anti-communists largely fought themselves. They bickered over relatively minor disputes, which were far outweighed by the threats facing them. When General Wrangel joined the White Army, it was led by General Denikin. Denikin was deeply flawed as a commander, but despite all his mistakes, Wrangel was unwaveringly loyal to him.

When rogue soldiers tried to place Wrangel (who had become famous for his bravery and integrity) at the head of the Army, Wrangel publicly refused and ordered them to obey Denikin. He understood that what strength they had depended on unity—they were outnumbered, their resources were limited. Worst of all, all the scheming and infighting created a climate of perpetual paranoia and backstabbing among the anticommunists. Because of this paranoia, Wrangel was eventually exiled by Denikin, only to be called back and placed at the head of the Army when Denikin resigned and fled the country.

Even after becoming head of anticommunist forces, General Wrangel was the target of numerous conspiracies from his own side. The war against the communists was going badly due to the huge disparity in numbers: the communists controlled the cities and could draft more soldiers. Frustrated, many anticommunist leaders went after the only targets they had access to: other anticommunists. The results were embarrassing and counterproductive. As much as these people didn’t like each other, they all would face the same fate at the hands of the Bolsheviks after the war: death or exile.

Wrangel took decisive steps to ensure that everyone under his command was on the same page. Very prominent leaders, military and civilian, caught undermining him were unceremoniously removed. There were no more games. Wrangel reinstated military courts and restored justice. Soldiers who committed serious crimes could no longer get away with them. Those caught abusing civilians were sometimes tried and executed on the same day. This approach to discipline actually made Wrangel more popular with his troops. People always want to be part of something with high standards.

 

4. Know What You’re Fighting For

 

One of Wrangel’s most important moves involved branding. Before Wrangel took over, the units that made up Denikin’s army were known by a variety of names including the “The Volunteer Army,” “The Don Army,” “The Caucasian Army,” and finally “The Armed Forces of South Russia.” Wrangel cut through crap and simply renamed his force “The Russian Army.” Wrangel was Russian, his men were Russian, the civilians he was trying to persuade to oppose the communists were Russian. And, despite how the Bolsheviks had hijacked his country, Wrangel still loved it. In a huge political split like that, the value of sticking to something people like and understand can’t be underestimated.

Likewise, while other generals took a lax approach to discipline, often looting the populace or behaving in outrageous ways, Wrangel focused on keeping the areas he controlled running as smoothly as possible. There was no tolerance for disorder on and behind the lines. Wrangel instituted land reforms that were so popular on both sides of the war that the Bolsheviks instituted the death penalty for their soldiers caught with pamphlets describing them. He was fighting for his country, not himself. Everything he did reflected that and people loved him for it.

This spirit lasted till the final days of the war. When the anticommunist’s position became impossible to defend, Wrangel ordered the full-scale evacuation of his army and any civilians who would face persecution under the Bolsheviks. While Denikin fled in a panic, leaving tens of thousands dead in a disorganized retreat, Wrangel had a plan in place beforehand. He personally led the orderly evacuation of nearly 150,000 soldiers and civilians, saving them from certain death. After Wrangel departed, the Bolsheviks executed roughly 100,000 civilians and prisoners who had been promised amnesty.

General Wrangel is a perfect role model for conservatives today. He was a man who stood up against the forces of terror and fought for his country against incredible odds. While a lot of people used the desperate times to toss aside their duties and composure, Wrangel rose to the occasion and acted with almost superhuman bravery and strength. “Always with Honor” really does describe him. When looking at the future, one hopes that conservatives will learn from the past, both by following the examples of heroes, and by avoiding the mistakes of those who failed miserably. As strange as the situation in America is today, it is not a new one. There’s a reason they don’t teach you about this in school.

The Russian Civil War (1917-1921) is a conflict that’s mostly ignored by public schools. For obvious reasons, teachers’ unions and the education industry prefer to focus on the Russian Revolution (1917) only: the “workers” rose up, overthrew the conservative bad guy, and lived happily ever after until WW2. End of story, right?

The true history of the Russian Revolution and ensuing Civil War is a lot more complicated. Not many people know that the conflict involved nearly a dozen modern nations, hundreds of thousands of troops, and advanced tactics that wouldn’t be seen again until the 1940s. An astounding 12 million people died, and it’s barely covered at all.

Although there is growing awareness of the heroic efforts of Polish, Ukrainian, and Finnish forces in opposing the series of communist invasions that followed the Russian Revolution, the actual Russian effort to oppose communism by force was largely unsung until recently. The memoirs of the last leader of Russian anti-communist forces, General Pyotr Wrangel, were republished under the title Always with Honor in 2020 by an obscure publishing house, generating new interest in the man and his struggle to save his country.

The book gives a first-hand narrative of the Russian Revolution and the desperate fighting that followed. The history is interesting in its own right, but Wrangel also illustrates many lessons that Americans facing an out-of-control government and new wave of leftwing political violence should take to heart.

 

1. Understand the Stakes

 

The Russian Revolution was two separate events: the February Revolution and the October Revolution. Both occurred in 1917. During the February Revolution, Czar Nicholas II, the leader of the Russian Empire, stepping down after facing massive criticism and controversy, along with very large riots in major cities.

The Czar loved his people, and resigned because he thought it would calm a situation that had already gotten out of hand. Instead, showing weakness only emboldened radicals. A pushover liberal government replaced the Czar, allowing the Bolsheviks—communist terrorists previously excluded from government entirely—an unprecedented voice. The Bolsheviks eventually swept aside the liberals and hijacked the entire country during the October Revolution.

It’s important to understand from the get-go what radicals like the Bolsheviks want. Although the Czar voluntarily resigned to avoid conflict, the Bolsheviks arrested him and his entire family and imprisoned them in a remote villa. Then, one day, without trial or provocation, they brutally murdered the Czar, his wife, his children, their servants—even the family dogs. They did it because they wanted to and there was no one to stop them. They denied it, then they covered it up, then they celebrated it. Sound familiar?

Millions of people would be killed by communist forces or their indirect actions throughout the Russian Civil War. Millions more, through no fault of their own, had their property stolen by the communists and would be forced to live in poverty or flee their homelands altogether. The consequences of “losing” a major political upheaval are very real.

 

2. You Can’t Run from What’s Coming

 

General Wrangel was the best of Russia before the Civil War: He was a hero during World War I and the Russo-Japanese War and had even been awarded The Order of Saint Nicholas—Russian Empire’s highest medal for bravery, the equivalent of America’s Medal of Honor. He loved his country, but resigned from the military after realizing that the liberal government was trying to destroy it on the eve of the October Revolution. He moved with his wife and children to his home by sea, far away from the craziness of the capitol.

The Revolution came to him. Communist sailors (oftentimes just freed prisoners given guns and uniforms) sailed into port and began terrorizing everyone in his area. Elderly veterans, well-off people, anyone who was suspected of liking things how they had been before the Revolution was arrested for no reason. General Wrangel was one of many prominent citizens taken into custody by the sailors. He wasn’t told what he was accused of; he hadn’t been accused of anything specific. They simply arrived at his house one day and took him away.

Wrangel was handcuffed and taken by the sailors to their ship. They were killing the people they had arrested and dumping them into the harbor. They had been murdering people all day. Wrangel was saved by his wife and his servants, who followed him to loudly protest. Because Wrangel was so well-loved by his community, and the Bolsheviks had already killed so many upstanding citizens that day, the impromptu firing squad was too embarrassed to carry out the deed and let him go. Others who had no one to speak for them were not so lucky.

As much as many like to imagine that moving far away from the out-of-control cities will help, ultimately it’s not a long-term solution. The people behind radical movements are not going to let you just walk away from them. They need to be confronted head on or they will build their power and come for you eventually. Having narrowly escaped death, Wrangel set out to join the White Army, the term used to describe the loose collection of anticommunist forces that came into being after the Revolution.

 

3. You’re All in This Together—Whether You Like It or Not

 

One of the biggest tricks the Bolsheviks played during the Russian Civil War was, ironically, supporting nationalist movements. The many historical nations of the Russian Empire had long wanted independence and very understandably wanted to separate themselves from the Russian basket case after the Bolshevik takeover. When these nations said: “Let us secede,” the Bolsheviks replied: “OK.” At first, at least.

However, every single one of those nations experienced a communist takeover attempt in the following years. By the end of WW2, all of them except Finland were under direct or indirect control of the Soviet Union. This process left millions dead, billions in property stolen, and entire families sent into exile or just wiped out. The Bolsheviks wanted their enemies to be divided. Six small nations with conflicting interests are a lot easier to take on than a united front.

Reading through General Wrangel’s memoirs is painful. You can see good people fall apart instead of standing together against a clear threat. The liberal government was weak and hated by everyone, including conservatives. Although a lot of people talked about “doing something,” only the Bolsheviks took steps to organize.  General Wrangel describes the state of total confusion among Russian patriots at the time. No one was sure who they were talking to.

Conservative plots to deal with the crisis were formed and went nowhere. Two patriotic generals made a show of marching troops on the capitol to restore order, but one of the generals shot himself rather than follow through and the other was arrested. The Left used the state police and intelligence agencies, which they now controlled, to “investigate” Russian conservatives while radical leftists staged increasingly violent protests and takeovers. Military officers and dignitaries were targeted for harassment while terrorists and career criminals were allowed to act with impunity.

While this was happening, the anti-communists largely fought themselves. They bickered over relatively minor disputes, which were far outweighed by the threats facing them. When General Wrangel joined the White Army, it was led by General Denikin. Denikin was deeply flawed as a commander, but despite all his mistakes, Wrangel was unwaveringly loyal to him.

When rogue soldiers tried to place Wrangel (who had become famous for his bravery and integrity) at the head of the Army, Wrangel publicly refused and ordered them to obey Denikin. He understood that what strength they had depended on unity—they were outnumbered, their resources were limited. Worst of all, all the scheming and infighting created a climate of perpetual paranoia and backstabbing among the anticommunists. Because of this paranoia, Wrangel was eventually exiled by Denikin, only to be called back and placed at the head of the Army when Denikin resigned and fled the country.

Even after becoming head of anticommunist forces, General Wrangel was the target of numerous conspiracies from his own side. The war against the communists was going badly due to the huge disparity in numbers: the communists controlled the cities and could draft more soldiers. Frustrated, many anticommunist leaders went after the only targets they had access to: other anticommunists. The results were embarrassing and counterproductive. As much as these people didn’t like each other, they all would face the same fate at the hands of the Bolsheviks after the war: death or exile.

Wrangel took decisive steps to ensure that everyone under his command was on the same page. Very prominent leaders, military and civilian, caught undermining him were unceremoniously removed. There were no more games. Wrangel reinstated military courts and restored justice. Soldiers who committed serious crimes could no longer get away with them. Those caught abusing civilians were sometimes tried and executed on the same day. This approach to discipline actually made Wrangel more popular with his troops. People always want to be part of something with high standards.

 

4. Know What You’re Fighting For

 

One of Wrangel’s most important moves involved branding. Before Wrangel took over, the units that made up Denikin’s army were known by a variety of names including the “The Volunteer Army,” “The Don Army,” “The Caucasian Army,” and finally “The Armed Forces of South Russia.” Wrangel cut through crap and simply renamed his force “The Russian Army.” Wrangel was Russian, his men were Russian, the civilians he was trying to persuade to oppose the communists were Russian. And, despite how the Bolsheviks had hijacked his country, Wrangel still loved it. In a huge political split like that, the value of sticking to something people like and understand can’t be underestimated.

Likewise, while other generals took a lax approach to discipline, often looting the populace or behaving in outrageous ways, Wrangel focused on keeping the areas he controlled running as smoothly as possible. There was no tolerance for disorder on and behind the lines. Wrangel instituted land reforms that were so popular on both sides of the war that the Bolsheviks instituted the death penalty for their soldiers caught with pamphlets describing them. He was fighting for his country, not himself. Everything he did reflected that and people loved him for it.

This spirit lasted till the final days of the war. When the anticommunist’s position became impossible to defend, Wrangel ordered the full-scale evacuation of his army and any civilians who would face persecution under the Bolsheviks. While Denikin fled in a panic, leaving tens of thousands dead in a disorganized retreat, Wrangel had a plan in place beforehand. He personally led the orderly evacuation of nearly 150,000 soldiers and civilians, saving them from certain death. After Wrangel departed, the Bolsheviks executed roughly 100,000 civilians and prisoners who had been promised amnesty.

General Wrangel is a perfect role model for conservatives today. He was a man who stood up against the forces of terror and fought for his country against incredible odds. While a lot of people used the desperate times to toss aside their duties and composure, Wrangel rose to the occasion and acted with almost superhuman bravery and strength. “Always with Honor” really does describe him. When looking at the future, one hopes that conservatives will learn from the past, both by following the examples of heroes, and by avoiding the mistakes of those who failed miserably. As strange as the situation in America is today, it is not a new one. There’s a reason they don’t teach you about this in school.

The Russian Civil War (1917-1921) is a conflict that’s mostly ignored by public schools. For obvious reasons, teachers’ unions and the education industry prefer to focus on the Russian Revolution (1917) only: the “workers” rose up, overthrew the conservative bad guy, and lived happily ever after until WW2. End of story, right?

The true history of the Russian Revolution and ensuing Civil War is a lot more complicated. Not many people know that the conflict involved nearly a dozen modern nations, hundreds of thousands of troops, and advanced tactics that wouldn’t be seen again until the 1940s. An astounding 12 million people died, and it’s barely covered at all.

Although there is growing awareness of the heroic efforts of Polish, Ukrainian, and Finnish forces in opposing the series of communist invasions that followed the Russian Revolution, the actual Russian effort to oppose communism by force was largely unsung until recently. The memoirs of the last leader of Russian anti-communist forces, General Pyotr Wrangel, were republished under the title Always with Honor in 2020 by an obscure publishing house, generating new interest in the man and his struggle to save his country.

The book gives a first-hand narrative of the Russian Revolution and the desperate fighting that followed. The history is interesting in its own right, but Wrangel also illustrates many lessons that Americans facing an out-of-control government and new wave of leftwing political violence should take to heart.

 

1. Understand the Stakes

 

The Russian Revolution was two separate events: the February Revolution and the October Revolution. Both occurred in 1917. During the February Revolution, Czar Nicholas II, the leader of the Russian Empire, stepping down after facing massive criticism and controversy, along with very large riots in major cities.

The Czar loved his people, and resigned because he thought it would calm a situation that had already gotten out of hand. Instead, showing weakness only emboldened radicals. A pushover liberal government replaced the Czar, allowing the Bolsheviks—communist terrorists previously excluded from government entirely—an unprecedented voice. The Bolsheviks eventually swept aside the liberals and hijacked the entire country during the October Revolution.

It’s important to understand from the get-go what radicals like the Bolsheviks want. Although the Czar voluntarily resigned to avoid conflict, the Bolsheviks arrested him and his entire family and imprisoned them in a remote villa. Then, one day, without trial or provocation, they brutally murdered the Czar, his wife, his children, their servants—even the family dogs. They did it because they wanted to and there was no one to stop them. They denied it, then they covered it up, then they celebrated it. Sound familiar?

Millions of people would be killed by communist forces or their indirect actions throughout the Russian Civil War. Millions more, through no fault of their own, had their property stolen by the communists and would be forced to live in poverty or flee their homelands altogether. The consequences of “losing” a major political upheaval are very real.

 

2. You Can’t Run from What’s Coming

 

General Wrangel was the best of Russia before the Civil War: He was a hero during World War I and the Russo-Japanese War and had even been awarded The Order of Saint Nicholas—Russian Empire’s highest medal for bravery, the equivalent of America’s Medal of Honor. He loved his country, but resigned from the military after realizing that the liberal government was trying to destroy it on the eve of the October Revolution. He moved with his wife and children to his home by sea, far away from the craziness of the capitol.

The Revolution came to him. Communist sailors (oftentimes just freed prisoners given guns and uniforms) sailed into port and began terrorizing everyone in his area. Elderly veterans, well-off people, anyone who was suspected of liking things how they had been before the Revolution was arrested for no reason. General Wrangel was one of many prominent citizens taken into custody by the sailors. He wasn’t told what he was accused of; he hadn’t been accused of anything specific. They simply arrived at his house one day and took him away.

Wrangel was handcuffed and taken by the sailors to their ship. They were killing the people they had arrested and dumping them into the harbor. They had been murdering people all day. Wrangel was saved by his wife and his servants, who followed him to loudly protest. Because Wrangel was so well-loved by his community, and the Bolsheviks had already killed so many upstanding citizens that day, the impromptu firing squad was too embarrassed to carry out the deed and let him go. Others who had no one to speak for them were not so lucky.

As much as many like to imagine that moving far away from the out-of-control cities will help, ultimately it’s not a long-term solution. The people behind radical movements are not going to let you just walk away from them. They need to be confronted head on or they will build their power and come for you eventually. Having narrowly escaped death, Wrangel set out to join the White Army, the term used to describe the loose collection of anticommunist forces that came into being after the Revolution.

 

3. You’re All in This Together—Whether You Like It or Not

 

One of the biggest tricks the Bolsheviks played during the Russian Civil War was, ironically, supporting nationalist movements. The many historical nations of the Russian Empire had long wanted independence and very understandably wanted to separate themselves from the Russian basket case after the Bolshevik takeover. When these nations said: “Let us secede,” the Bolsheviks replied: “OK.” At first, at least.

However, every single one of those nations experienced a communist takeover attempt in the following years. By the end of WW2, all of them except Finland were under direct or indirect control of the Soviet Union. This process left millions dead, billions in property stolen, and entire families sent into exile or just wiped out. The Bolsheviks wanted their enemies to be divided. Six small nations with conflicting interests are a lot easier to take on than a united front.

Reading through General Wrangel’s memoirs is painful. You can see good people fall apart instead of standing together against a clear threat. The liberal government was weak and hated by everyone, including conservatives. Although a lot of people talked about “doing something,” only the Bolsheviks took steps to organize.  General Wrangel describes the state of total confusion among Russian patriots at the time. No one was sure who they were talking to.

Conservative plots to deal with the crisis were formed and went nowhere. Two patriotic generals made a show of marching troops on the capitol to restore order, but one of the generals shot himself rather than follow through and the other was arrested. The Left used the state police and intelligence agencies, which they now controlled, to “investigate” Russian conservatives while radical leftists staged increasingly violent protests and takeovers. Military officers and dignitaries were targeted for harassment while terrorists and career criminals were allowed to act with impunity.

While this was happening, the anti-communists largely fought themselves. They bickered over relatively minor disputes, which were far outweighed by the threats facing them. When General Wrangel joined the White Army, it was led by General Denikin. Denikin was deeply flawed as a commander, but despite all his mistakes, Wrangel was unwaveringly loyal to him.

When rogue soldiers tried to place Wrangel (who had become famous for his bravery and integrity) at the head of the Army, Wrangel publicly refused and ordered them to obey Denikin. He understood that what strength they had depended on unity—they were outnumbered, their resources were limited. Worst of all, all the scheming and infighting created a climate of perpetual paranoia and backstabbing among the anticommunists. Because of this paranoia, Wrangel was eventually exiled by Denikin, only to be called back and placed at the head of the Army when Denikin resigned and fled the country.

Even after becoming head of anticommunist forces, General Wrangel was the target of numerous conspiracies from his own side. The war against the communists was going badly due to the huge disparity in numbers: the communists controlled the cities and could draft more soldiers. Frustrated, many anticommunist leaders went after the only targets they had access to: other anticommunists. The results were embarrassing and counterproductive. As much as these people didn’t like each other, they all would face the same fate at the hands of the Bolsheviks after the war: death or exile.

Wrangel took decisive steps to ensure that everyone under his command was on the same page. Very prominent leaders, military and civilian, caught undermining him were unceremoniously removed. There were no more games. Wrangel reinstated military courts and restored justice. Soldiers who committed serious crimes could no longer get away with them. Those caught abusing civilians were sometimes tried and executed on the same day. This approach to discipline actually made Wrangel more popular with his troops. People always want to be part of something with high standards.

 

4. Know What You’re Fighting For

 

One of Wrangel’s most important moves involved branding. Before Wrangel took over, the units that made up Denikin’s army were known by a variety of names including the “The Volunteer Army,” “The Don Army,” “The Caucasian Army,” and finally “The Armed Forces of South Russia.” Wrangel cut through crap and simply renamed his force “The Russian Army.” Wrangel was Russian, his men were Russian, the civilians he was trying to persuade to oppose the communists were Russian. And, despite how the Bolsheviks had hijacked his country, Wrangel still loved it. In a huge political split like that, the value of sticking to something people like and understand can’t be underestimated.

Likewise, while other generals took a lax approach to discipline, often looting the populace or behaving in outrageous ways, Wrangel focused on keeping the areas he controlled running as smoothly as possible. There was no tolerance for disorder on and behind the lines. Wrangel instituted land reforms that were so popular on both sides of the war that the Bolsheviks instituted the death penalty for their soldiers caught with pamphlets describing them. He was fighting for his country, not himself. Everything he did reflected that and people loved him for it.

This spirit lasted till the final days of the war. When the anticommunist’s position became impossible to defend, Wrangel ordered the full-scale evacuation of his army and any civilians who would face persecution under the Bolsheviks. While Denikin fled in a panic, leaving tens of thousands dead in a disorganized retreat, Wrangel had a plan in place beforehand. He personally led the orderly evacuation of nearly 150,000 soldiers and civilians, saving them from certain death. After Wrangel departed, the Bolsheviks executed roughly 100,000 civilians and prisoners who had been promised amnesty.

General Wrangel is a perfect role model for conservatives today. He was a man who stood up against the forces of terror and fought for his country against incredible odds. While a lot of people used the desperate times to toss aside their duties and composure, Wrangel rose to the occasion and acted with almost superhuman bravery and strength. “Always with Honor” really does describe him. When looking at the future, one hopes that conservatives will learn from the past, both by following the examples of heroes, and by avoiding the mistakes of those who failed miserably. As strange as the situation in America is today, it is not a new one. There’s a reason they don’t teach you about this in school.

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6 Ways to Turn Off a New Gun Owner Firearm training can take a hard left turn quickly if the instructor falls into one of these categories. by HEIDI LYN RAO

Handgun Class

Firearm sales are continue to be brisk, with more people purchasing their first firearm—one third of them by women in 2021. Many are seeking formal training to learn the safe and responsible use of that firearm. As instructors, we only get one chance to make a good first impression. I strive to make that first contact with new gun owners a positive, memorable and impactful experience. As exciting as this first impression can be, it can take a hard left turn quickly!

The last thing we want to do is to overwhelm or intimidate a new firearm owner with too much information, or talk or train too high over their head. And we certainly don’t want them to leave. With that in mind, here are six instructor stereotypes to avoid when conducting a beginning firearms class.

1. The Tactical Instructor
This instructor conducts his or her class in tactical gear. There is definitely a place for this gear, equipment and accessories if you are teaching a tactical class and have advertised your training as such. However, meeting new firearm owners for the first time is not the place to gear up. This can be a quick turn off for someone who knows nothing about firearms and is only seeking the introductory basics.

2. The Open Carry Instructor
Open carrying a firearm may be appropriate for advanced classes, but it can be very intimidating to a new gun owner. New gun owners may be anxious about their new purchase, and possibly nervous at the thought of taking a class on firearms. An instructor who is wearing a gun, visible on their belt in a holster, or one strapped to their thigh, may be very distracting to a novice student. A new student may be too focused on the firearm on your belt to hear what you are saying.

3. The “Patch Collector” Instructor
Yes, it is very impressive that you have spent many years and invested a lot of money to advance your firearm training, knowledge and credentials, gaining patches and certificates along the way. Although something to be proud of, these highly decorated shirts or vests may have an opposite effect when working with new firearm owners. I used to teach in a decorated instructor shirt, displaying my patches of credentials, until a few students told me they were intimidated by all the patches on my shirt. I now wear a simple “Instructor” T-shirt purchased from the NRA Store to make students feel more at ease.

4. The “All About Me” Instructor
We’ve all been there—sitting in a class, training or meeting where the speaker is more interested in sharing his or her personal stories rather than staying on topic. The reason someone signs up for training is to gain knowledge about a particular item or topic. A few relevant stories here and there may be appropriate during the lesson, but straying off topic and boasting personal stories is not. This is a huge turn-off, especially to a brand-new gun owner seeking knowledge about their new purchase. There is a distinction between an instructor sharing their credentials and credibility for speaking to the topic at-hand, versus standing on a platform and touting story after story.

5. The Graphic Instructor
I recently attended an event advertised to recruit new women gun owners. The classroom was filled with eager-to-learn ladies who were brand new to firearms. Before even discussing firearm safety or going over the basic gun parts, the instructor started telling these new gun owners why they needed to use hollow-point bullets, and described the physical damage they can cause. This was just the beginning of the “blood and gore” class. I knew from the looks on the faces of these ladies that they had already tuned out the instructor. Some of the women left after break time, and others commented, “I just don’t think this is for me.”

6. The Confusing Instructor
The terms we use matter. Instructors need to use the correct vocabulary when teaching. For example, avoid referring to cartridges as bullets or describing magazines as clips. Firearms have their own language. I was once talking about the different magnum revolvers and using the phrases “.357 Mag,” “.41 Mag.” and “.44 Mag.” A student raised his hand and asked what a “mag” was. I realized that I was abbreviating “magnum,” which was confusing my students. Instructors should also avoid using the word “weapon” when referring to a firearm with new gun owners, which may be very intimidating to someone in a basic firearms class.

If you are fortunate enough to help new firearm owners become familiar with their new purchase and comfortable on the range, it is important to remember one thing: Teach and train at their level. Remember how long it took you to get to the level you are with your firearms knowledge and handling. We want these brand-new gun owners to have a positive first experience, so they recruit more new gun owners to share the knowledge, skills and proper attitude!

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Allies Darwin would of approved of this! Dear Grumpy Advice on Teaching in Today's Classroom Hard Nosed Folks Both Good & Bad Leadership of the highest kind Soldiering This great Nation & Its People

Now here was a Man! One of my Icons TR

A picture of President Theodore Roosevelt

 Portrait of U.S. President Theodore (“Teddy”) Roosevelt. (Photo by Culture Club/Getty Images)
Theodore Roosevelt was the 26th president of the United States, ascending to the office following the assassination of President William McKinley in 1901.
At 42, Theodore Roosevelt became the youngest president in the nation’s history and was subsequently elected to a second term. Dynamic in personality and filled with enthusiasm and vigor, Roosevelt was more than a successful politician. He was also an accomplished writer, a fearless soldier and war hero, and a dedicated naturalist.

Considered by many historians to be one of our greatest presidents, Theodore Roosevelt is one of the four whose faces are depicted on Mount Rushmore. Theodore Roosevelt was also the uncle of Eleanor Roosevelt and the fifth cousin of the 32nd president of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Dates: October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919
Presidential Term: 1901-1909
Also Known As: “Teddy,” TR, “The Rough Rider, “The Old Lion,” “Trust Buster”
Famous Quote: “Speak softly and carry a big stick—you will go far.”

Childhood

Theodore Roosevelt was born the second of four children to Theodore Roosevelt, Sr. and Martha Bulloch Roosevelt on October 27, 1858 in New York City. Descended from 17th-century Dutch immigrants who made their fortune in real estate, the elder Roosevelt also owned a prosperous glass-importing business.
Theodore, known as “Teedie” to his family, was an especially sickly child who suffered from severe asthma and digestive problems his entire childhood.

As he grew older, Theodore gradually had fewer and fewer bouts of asthma. Encouraged by his father, he worked to become physically stronger through a regimen of hiking, boxing, and weightlifting.

Young Theodore developed a passion for natural science at an early age and collected specimens of various animals.

He referred to his collection as “The Roosevelt Museum of Natural History.”

Life at Harvard

In 1876, at the age of 18, Roosevelt entered Harvard University, where he quickly earned a reputation as an eccentric young man with a toothy grin and a tendency to chatter constantly. Roosevelt would interrupt professors’ lectures, injecting his opinion in a voice that has been described as a high-pitched stammer.
Roosevelt lived off campus in a room that his older sister Bamie had chosen and furnished for him. There, he continued his study of animals, sharing quarters with live snakes, lizards, and even a large tortoise. Roosevelt also began work on his first book, The Naval War of 1812.
During the Christmas holiday of 1877, Theodore Sr. became seriously ill. Later diagnosed with stomach cancer, he died on February 9, 1878. Young Theodore was devastated at the loss of the man he had so admired.

Marriage to Alice Lee

In the fall of 1879, while visiting the home of one of his college friends, Roosevelt met Alice Lee, a beautiful young woman from a wealthy Boston family. He was immediately smitten. They courted for a year and became engaged in January 1880.
Roosevelt graduated from Harvard in June 1880.

He entered Columbia Law School in New York City in the fall, reasoning that a married man should have a respectable career.

On October 27, 1880, Alice and Theodore were married. It was Roosevelt’s 22nd birthday; Alice was 19 years old. They moved in with Roosevelt’s mother in Manhattan, as Alice’s parents had insisted they do.
Roosevelt soon tired of his law studies. He found a calling that interested him far more than the law—politics.

Elected to the New York State Assembly

Roosevelt began to attend local meetings of the Republican Party while still in school. When approached by party leaders—who believed his famous name might help him win—Roosevelt agreed to run for the New York State Assembly in 1881. Twenty-three-year-old Roosevelt won his first political race, becoming the youngest man ever elected to the New York State Assembly.
Brimming with confidence, Roosevelt burst upon the scene at the state capitol in Albany. Many of the more seasoned assemblymen derided him for his dandified apparel and upper class accent. They ridiculed Roosevelt, referring to him as the “young squirt,” “his Lordship,” or simply “that fool.”
Roosevelt quickly made a reputation as a reformer, supporting bills that would improve working conditions in factories. Re-elected the following year, Roosevelt was appointed by Governor Grover Cleveland to head a new commission on civil service reform.
In 1882, Roosevelt’s book, The Naval War of 1812, was published, receiving high praise for its scholarship. (Roosevelt would go on to publish 45 books in his lifetime, including several biographies, historical books, and an autobiography. He was also a proponent of “simplified spelling,” a movement in support of phonetic spelling.)

Double Tragedy

In the summer of 1883, Roosevelt and his wife purchased land at Oyster Bay, Long Island in New York and made plans to build a new home. They also discovered that Alice was pregnant with their first child.
On February 12, 1884, Roosevelt, working in Albany, received word that his wife had delivered a healthy baby girl in New York City. He was thrilled by the news, but learned the following day that Alice was ill. He quickly boarded a train.
Roosevelt was greeted at the door by his brother Elliott, who informed him that not only was his wife dying, his mother was as well. Roosevelt was stunned beyond words.

His mother, suffering from typhoid fever, died early on the morning of February 14. Alice, stricken with Bright’s disease, a kidney ailment, died later that same day. The baby was named Alice Lee Roosevelt, in honor of her mother.

Consumed with grief, Roosevelt coped the only way he knew how—by burying himself in his work. When his term in the assembly was completed, he left New York for the Dakota Territory, determined to make a life as a cattle rancher.
Little Alice was left in the care of Roosevelt’s sister Bamie.

Roosevelt in the Wild West

Sporting pince-nez glasses and an upper class East-Coast accent, Roosevelt didn’t seem to belong in so rugged a place as the Dakota Territory. But those who doubted him would soon learn that Theodore Roosevelt could hold his own.
Famous stories of his time in the Dakotas reveal Roosevelt’s true character. In one instance, a barroom bully—drunk and brandishing a loaded pistol in each hand—called Roosevelt “four eyes.” To the surprise of bystanders, Roosevelt—the former boxer—slugged the man in the jaw, knocking him to the floor.
Another story involves the theft of a small boat owned by Roosevelt. The boat wasn’t worth a lot, but Roosevelt insisted that the thieves be brought to justice. Although it was the dead of winter, Roosevelt and his cohorts tracked the two men into Indian Territory and brought them back to face trial.
Roosevelt stayed out West for about two years, but after two harsh winters, he lost most of his cattle, along with his investment.

He returned to New York for good in the summer of 1886. While Roosevelt had been away, his sister Bamie had overseen the construction of his new home.

Marriage to Edith Carow

During Roosevelt’s time out West, he had taken occasional trips back East to visit family. During one of those visits, he began seeing his childhood friend, Edith Kermit Carow. They became engaged in November 1885.
Edith Carow and Theodore Roosevelt were married on December 2, 1886. He was 28 years old, and Edith was 25. They moved into their newly-built home in Oyster Bay, which Roosevelt had christened “Sagamore Hill.” Little Alice came to live with her father and his new wife.
In September 1887, Edith gave birth to Theodore, Jr., the first of the couple’s five children. He was followed by Kermit in 1889, Ethel in 1891, Archie in 1894, and Quentin in 1897.

Commissioner Roosevelt

Following the 1888 election of Republican President Benjamin Harrison, Roosevelt was appointed Civil Service commissioner. He moved to Washington D.C. in May 1889. Roosevelt held the position for six years, earning a reputation as a man of integrity.
Roosevelt returned to New York City in 1895, when he was appointed city police commissioner. There, he declared war on corruption in the police department, firing the corrupt chief of police, among others. Roosevelt also took the unusual step of patrolling the streets at night to see for himself if his patrolmen were doing their jobs.
He often brought a member of the press with him to document his excursions. (This marked the beginning of a healthy relationship with the press that Roosevelt maintained—some would say exploited—throughout his public life.)

Assistant Secretary of the Navy

In 1896, newly-elected Republican President William McKinley appointed Roosevelt assistant secretary of the Navy. The two men differed in their views toward foreign affairs. Roosevelt, in contrast to McKinley, favored an aggressive foreign policy. He quickly took up the cause of expanding and strengthening the U.S. Navy.
In 1898, the island nation of Cuba, a Spanish possession, was the scene of a native rebellion against Spanish rule. Reports described rioting by rebels in Havana, a scenario which was seen as a threat to American citizens and businesses in Cuba.
Urged on by Roosevelt, President McKinley sent the battleship Maine to Havana in January 1898 as protection for American interests there. Following a suspicious explosion on board the ship a month later, in which 250 American sailors were killed, McKinley asked Congress for a declaration of war in April 1898.

The Spanish-American War and TR’s Rough Riders

Roosevelt, who, at the age of 39 had waited his entire life to engage in actual battle, immediately resigned his position as assistant secretary of the Navy. He secured for himself a commission as a lieutenant colonel in a volunteer army, dubbed by the press “The Rough Riders.”
The men landed in Cuba in June 1898, and soon suffered some losses as they battled Spanish forces. Traveling both by foot and on horseback, the Rough Riders helped to capture Kettle Hill and San Juan Hill. Both charges succeeded at running off the Spanish, and the U.S. Navy finished the job by destroying the Spanish fleet at Santiago in southern Cuba in July.

From Governor of NY to Vice President

The Spanish-American War had not only established the United States as a world power; it had also made Roosevelt a national hero. When he returned to New York, he was chosen as the Republican nominee for governor of New York. Roosevelt won the gubernatorial election in 1899 at the age of 40.
As governor, Roosevelt set his sights on reforming business practices, enacting tougher civil service laws, and the protection of state forests.
Although he was popular with voters, some politicians were anxious to get the reform-minded Roosevelt out of the governor’s mansion. Republican Senator Thomas Platt came up with a plan for getting rid of Governor Roosevelt.
He convinced President McKinley, who was running for re-election (and whose vice president had died in office) to select Roosevelt as his running mate in the 1900 election. After some hesitation—fearing he would have no real work to do as vice president—Roosevelt accepted.
The McKinley-Roosevelt ticket sailed to an easy victory in 1900.

Assassination of McKinley; Roosevelt Becomes President

Roosevelt had only been in office six months when President McKinley was shot by anarchist Leon Czolgosz on September 5, 1901 in Buffalo, New York. McKinley succumbed to his wounds on September 14. Roosevelt was summoned to Buffalo, where he took the oath of office that same day. At 42 years old, Theodore Roosevelt became the youngest president in America’s history.
Mindful of the need for stability, Roosevelt kept the same cabinet members McKinley had appointed. Nonetheless, Theodore Roosevelt was about to put his own stamp upon the presidency.
He insisted the public must be protected from unfair business practices. Roosevelt was especially opposed to “trusts,” businesses that allowed no competition, which were therefore able to charge whatever they chose.
Despite the passage of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act in 1890, previous presidents had not made it a priority to enforce the act. Roosevelt did enforce it, by suing the Northern Securities Company—which was run by J.P. Morgan and controlled three major railroads—for violating the Sherman Act.
The U.S. Supreme Court later ruled that the company had indeed violated the law, and the monopoly was dissolved.
Roosevelt then took on the coal industry in May 1902 when Pennsylvania coal miners went on strike. The strike dragged on for several months, with mine owners refusing to negotiate.
As the nation faced the prospect of a cold winter without coal to keep people warm, Roosevelt intervened. He threatened to bring in federal troops to work the coal mines if a settlement was not reached. Faced with such a threat, mine owners agreed to negotiate.
In order to regulate businesses and help prevent further abuses of power by large corporations, Roosevelt created the Department of Commerce and Labor in 1903.
Theodore Roosevelt is also responsible for changing the name of the “executive mansion” to “the White House” by signing an executive order in 1902 that officially changed the iconic building’s name.

The Square Deal and Conservationism

During his re-election campaign, Theodore Roosevelt expressed his commitment to a platform he called “The Square Deal.”
This group of progressive policies aimed to improve the lives of all Americans in three ways: limiting the power of large corporations, protecting consumers from unsafe products, and promoting the conservation of natural resources.
Roosevelt succeeded in each of these areas, from his trust-busting and safe food legislation to his involvement in protecting the environment.
In an era when natural resources were consumed without regard to conservation, Roosevelt sounded the alarm. In 1905, he created the U.S. Forest Service, which would employ rangers to oversee the nation’s forests.
Roosevelt also created five national parks, 51 wildlife refuges, and 18 national monuments. He played a role in the formation of the National Conservation Commission, which documented all of the nation’s natural resources.
Although he loved wildlife, Roosevelt was an avid hunter. In one instance, he was unsuccessful during a bear hunt. To appease him, his aides caught an old bear and tied it to a tree for him to shoot.
Roosevelt refused, saying he couldn’t shoot an animal in such a way. Once the story went to press, a toy manufacturer began producing stuffed bears, named “teddy bears” after the president.
In part because of Roosevelt’s commitment to conservation, his is one of four presidents’ faces carved on Mount Rushmore.

The Panama Canal

In 1903, Roosevelt took on a project that many others had failed to accomplish—the creation of a canal through Central America that would link the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Roosevelt’s main obstacle was the problem of obtaining land rights from Colombia, which held control of Panama.
For decades, Panamanians had been trying to break free from Colombia and become an independent nation. In November 1903, Panamanians staged a rebellion, backed by President Roosevelt. He sent the USS Nashville and other cruisers to the coast of Panama to stand by during the revolution.
Within days, the revolution was over, and Panama had gained its independence. Roosevelt could now make a deal with the newly-liberated nation. The Panama Canal, a marvel of engineering, was completed in 1914.
The events leading up to the construction of the canal exemplified Roosevelt’s foreign policy motto: “Speak softly and carry a big stick—you will go far.” When his attempts to negotiate a deal with the Colombians failed, Roosevelt resorted to force, by sending military assistance to the Panamanians.

Roosevelt’s Second Term

Roosevelt was easily re-elected to a second term in 1904 but vowed he would not seek re-election after he completed his term. He continued to push for reform, advocating for the Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act, both enacted in 1906.
In the summer of 1905, Roosevelt hosted diplomats from Russia and Japan at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in an effort to negotiate a peace treaty between the two nations, who had been at war since February 1904.
Thanks to Roosevelt’s efforts in brokering an agreement, Russia and Japan finally signed the Treaty of Portsmouth in September 1905, ending the Russo-Japanese War. Roosevelt was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1906 for his role in the negotiations.
The Russo-Japanese War had also resulted in a mass exodus of unwelcome Japanese citizens to San Francisco. The San Francisco school board issued an order that would force Japanese children to attend separate schools.
Roosevelt intervened, convincing the school board to rescind its order, and the Japanese to limit the number of laborers they allowed to immigrate to San Francisco. The 1907 compromise was known as the “Gentlemen’s Agreement.”
Roosevelt came under harsh criticism by the black community for his actions following an incident in Brownsville, Texas in August 1906.
A regiment of black soldiers stationed nearby was blamed for a series of shootings in the town. Although there was no proof of the soldiers’ involvement and none of them was ever tried in a court of law, Roosevelt saw to it that all 167 soldiers were given dishonorable discharges. Men who had been soldiers for decades lost all of their benefits and pensions.
In a show of American might before he left office, Roosevelt sent all 16 of America’s battleships on a worldwide tour in December 1907.Although the move was a controversial one, the “Great White Fleet” was well-received by most nations.
In 1908, Roosevelt, a man of his word, declined to run for re-election. Republican William Howard Taft, his hand-picked successor, won the election. With great reluctance, Roosevelt left the White House in March 1909. He was 50 years old.

Another Run for President

Following Taft’s inauguration, Roosevelt went on a 12-month African safari, and later toured Europe with his wife. Upon his return to the U.S. in June 1910, Roosevelt found that he disapproved of many of Taft’s policies. He regretted not having run for re-election in 1908.
By January 1912, Roosevelt had decided he would run again for president, and began his campaign for the Republican nomination. When Taft was re-nominated by the Republican Party, however, a disappointed Roosevelt refused to give up.
He formed the Progressive Party, also known as “The Bull Moose Party,” so named after Roosevelt’s exclamation during a speech that he was “feeling like a bull moose.” Theodore Roosevelt ran as the party’s candidate against Taft and Democratic challenger Woodrow Wilson.
During one campaign speech, Roosevelt was shot in the chest, sustaining a minor wound. He insisted on finishing his hour-long speech before seeking medical attention.
Neither Taft nor Roosevelt would prevail in the end. Because the Republican vote was split between them, Wilson emerged as the victor.

Final Years

Ever the adventurer, Roosevelt embarked upon an expedition to South America with his son Kermit and a group of explorers in 1913. The perilous voyage down Brazil’s River of Doubt nearly cost Roosevelt his life.
Where He contracted yellow fever and suffered a severe leg injury; as a result, he needed to be carried through the jungle for much of the journey. Roosevelt returned home a changed man, much frailer and thinner than before. He never again enjoyed his former robust state of health.
Back home, Roosevelt criticized President Wilson for his policies of neutrality during the First World War. When Wilson finally declared war on Germany in April 1917, all four of Roosevelt’s sons volunteered to serve. (Roosevelt also offered to serve, but his offer was politely declined.)
In July 1918, his youngest son Quentin was killed when his plane was shot down by the Germans. The tremendous loss appeared to age Roosevelt even more than his disastrous trip to Brazil.
In his final years, Roosevelt contemplated running again for president in 1920, having gained a good deal of support from progressive Republicans. But he never had the chance to run. Roosevelt died in his sleep of a coronary embolism on January 6, 1919 at the age of 60.

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Dear Grumpy Advice on Teaching in Today's Classroom Good News for a change!

One of the Best Places to go in America – The Grand canyon at Sunrise!

r/EarthPorn - arizona has the best sunsets. 4480x6720 [oc]

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All About Guns Born again Cynic! Dear Grumpy Advice on Teaching in Today's Classroom

New Ohio law allows teachers to carry guns in schools without a permit

Governor Mike DeWine signs law which also applies to custodians and bus drivers, while slashing training requirements
Governor Mike DeWine: ‘This does not require any school to arm teachers or staff. Every school will make its own decision.’
Governor Mike DeWine: ‘This does not require any school to arm teachers or staff. Every school will make its own decision.’ Photograph: David Richard/AP

Ohio’s permitless gun carry law for “qualifying” adults went into effect on Monday – a measure that would lift restrictions on school teachers, custodians and bus drivers from carrying firearms at work.

After Governor Mike DeWine announced he signed House Bill 99, which lowers the required training hours for armed personnel from 728 hours to 24 hours, DeWine said he still preferred law enforcement officers to carry the guns at schools.

Signed into law after 19 children and two teachers were killed at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, the legislation no longer makes it a requirement for Ohioans aged 21 and older to complete eight hours of the handgun training course to carry and conceal a firearm. And it eliminates the requirement for gun carriers to tell police officers they have a concealed weapon on them, though they must say if they are asked.

“My office worked with the general assembly to remove hundreds of hours of curriculum irrelevant to school safety and to ensure training requirements were specific to a school environment and contained significant scenario-based training,” DeWine said in a statement after the bill passed earlier this month.

He thanked lawmakers “for passing this bill to protect Ohio children and teachers”.

DeWine said local school districts may still prohibit guns on school grounds. “This does not require any school to arm teachers or staff,” he said. “Every school will make its own decision.”

While school boards will not be required to arm personnel, they will have to notify parents if they choose to do so. Boards can mandate additional training beyond what is required in the new state law.

According to the bill, training must include how to stop an active shooter, how to de-escalate a violent situation, trauma care and first aid, at least four hours in “scenario-based or simulated training exercises” and completing “tactical live firearms training”.

Republican state lawmakers have said that HB 99 was a “doing something” response to the Uvalde massacre and other recent deadly mass shootings.

However, Democratic politicians in the state have argued against the measure, saying that lifting carry laws for teachers was not what the community was asking for. “They’re not asking for no guns. They’re asking for background checks,” state representative Juanita Brent, a Democrat from Cleveland, said after the bill passed.

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 28 states allow people other than security officers to carry guns on school grounds. A 2018 Gallup poll showed that 73% of teachers opposed the idea.

In Ohio, school employees have been allowed to carry guns on school grounds for years as long as the local school board consents. The Ohio supreme court ruled in 2021 that they should receive the same 700 hours of training as law enforcement officials or security officers.

In Ohio, “permitless carry” applies only to adults over 21 who are not prohibited from possessing a firearm under state or federal law. Under the new law, adults who can lawfully own a firearm will be able to conceal carry a handgun without a permit or background checks.

———————————————————————————–   As a retired teacher I think that this is a REALLY BAD IDEA! As I would not trust most of the Teachers that I worked with a Swiss Army Knife let alone a gun. Also how about just hiring instead some retired Cops. As I am sure that a lot of them wouldn’t mind picking up a few bucks and being around kids. Instead of  some hardened Psycho with a machete etc. etc. Grumpy

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Art Dear Grumpy Advice on Teaching in Today's Classroom Interesting stuff

Kinda puts things in perspective huh? That and the Ancients did not fuck around when the King Of Parthia wanted a house!

I can just imagine what that Grunt in Iraq must be thinking “Whoa!” Grumpy

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Dear Grumpy Advice on Teaching in Today's Classroom

Some I bet you didn’t know this one